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2014

History of Gender

Institution
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Articles 1 - 25 of 25

Full-Text Articles in Social History

Red Lights, White Chapel: The Working Girls Of Des Moines At The Turn Of The Century, Hope C. Mitchell Nov 2014

Red Lights, White Chapel: The Working Girls Of Des Moines At The Turn Of The Century, Hope C. Mitchell

Digital Scholarship and Initiatives Conference Presentations and Posters

Hope Mitchell, who is perhaps better known as Iowa's “Prostitution Historian,” will be the featured speaker. Mitchell earned the Iowa History Center’s Outstanding Master’s Thesis in Iowa History award this year for “Sacrificing our Daughters: Changing Perceptions of Prostitution in Iowa, 1880-1915.” She will share her research exploring the relationship between prostitution and farming culture, particularly among the women who worked in Des Moines’ red-light district, nicknamed “White Chapel” after the district in London’s east end where Jack the Ripper was known to haunt. Currently, Mitchell works as the Assistant Coordinator of the Digital Repository at ...


Review Of Notable Men And Women Of Our Time, Brian Maxson Oct 2014

Review Of Notable Men And Women Of Our Time, Brian Maxson

Brian J. Maxson

Paolo Giovio wrote his text in the aftermath of the sack of Rome by imperial troops in 1527, although the work remained unfinished at the time of the author's death some twenty-five years.


Sacrificing Our Daughters: Changing Perceptions Of Prostitution In Iowa, 1880-1915, Hope C. Mitchell Oct 2014

Sacrificing Our Daughters: Changing Perceptions Of Prostitution In Iowa, 1880-1915, Hope C. Mitchell

Digital Scholarship and Initiatives Conference Presentations and Posters

Ankeny native Hope Mitchell was this year’s recipient of the Iowa History Center’s annual award for the Outstanding Master’s Thesis in Iowa History. Mitchell received her MA in history from Iowa State University in the spring of 2014 and was recognized for her thesis, “Sacrificing our Daughters: Changing Perceptions of Prostitution in Iowa, 1880-1915.” Not only was she honored by the Center with a plaque and $1,000 prize, she was also featured in a front-page article in the Des Moines Register. Mitchell’s study focused on prostitution in Des Moines and examined the city’s changing ...


The History Of The Dance Cards Of Gettysburg College, Jessica N. Casale Oct 2014

The History Of The Dance Cards Of Gettysburg College, Jessica N. Casale

Student Publications

The annual dances at Gettysburg College were the most popular social activity for students for over fifty years. The dance cards held in Special Collections at Musselman Library sparked an interest in the history of these dances and why they are not continued today. This research project uncovers the reason for the sudden extinction of a social event once adored by college students. It includes the prevalence of Greek life on campus and its effect on social life.


The Ideal And The Real: Southern Plantation Women Of The Civil War, Kelly H. Crosby Oct 2014

The Ideal And The Real: Southern Plantation Women Of The Civil War, Kelly H. Crosby

Student Publications

Southern plantation women experienced a shift in identity over the course of the Civil War. Through the diaries of Catherine Edmondston and Eliza Fain, historians note the discrepancy between the ideal and real roles women had while the men were off fighting. Unique perspectives and hidden voices in their writings offer valuable insight into the life of plantation women and the hybrid identity they gained despite the Confederate loss.


'Fors Clavigera', The Young Women Of Whitelands College, And The Temptations Of Social History, Christopher Bischof Sep 2014

'Fors Clavigera', The Young Women Of Whitelands College, And The Temptations Of Social History, Christopher Bischof

History Faculty Publications

On the first of May each year from the 1880s onward the young women at Whitelands teacher training college in London celebrated by throwing to the wind the timetable that normally dictated how their every moment would be spent. Instead, they adorned the college in flowers, donned in white dresses, and spent the day dancing, singing, and reading poetry. The tradition of May Day helped to poke a hole in the rather dour institutional regimen of Whitelands, which opened the way for many smaller, everyday acts that gradually reworked the ethos of the college.


Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye Aug 2014

Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Women were active participants in the anti-slavery movement. They made up a large portion of professional abolitionists who traveled the country to educate the public on the perils of slavery. Unfortunately, their efforts were hindered by their gender, and it led to the restriction of their rights to speak publicly on the issue of slavery. This paper chronicles freedom of speech and the abolition movement and its impact on the women who fought for their rights to share in the emancipation fight. It’s a story about the efficacy of language and its impact on history and social change. The ...


Flores-González, Nilda, Et. Al. Immigrant Women Workers In The Neoliberal Age., Linda M. Crawford Phd Aug 2014

Flores-González, Nilda, Et. Al. Immigrant Women Workers In The Neoliberal Age., Linda M. Crawford Phd

Journal of Interdisciplinary Feminist Thought

No abstract provided.


Jewel Of Womanhood: A Feminist Reinterpretation Of Queen Katherine Howard, Holly K. Kizewski Jul 2014

Jewel Of Womanhood: A Feminist Reinterpretation Of Queen Katherine Howard, Holly K. Kizewski

Dissertations, Theses, & Student Research, Department of History

In 1540, King Henry VIII married his fifth wife, Katherine Howard. Less than two years later, the young queen was executed on charges of adultery. Katherine Howard has been much maligned by history, often depicted as foolish, vain, and outrageously promiscuous. Her few defenders often attempt to exonerate Katherine by claiming that she was chaste, innocent of the adultery charges brought against her, or a victim of rape. Both detractors and defenders usually reduce Katherine to her sexuality.

However, the surviving primary sources about Katherine reveal a more complex individual. In fact, examination of conduct books for young women of ...


Finding Margaret Haughery: The Forgotten And Remembered Lives Of New Orleans’S “Bread Woman” In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries, Katherine Adrienne Luck May 2014

Finding Margaret Haughery: The Forgotten And Remembered Lives Of New Orleans’S “Bread Woman” In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Centuries, Katherine Adrienne Luck

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

Margaret Haughery (1813-1882), a widowed, illiterate Irish immigrant who became known as “the Bread Woman” of New Orleans and the “Angel of the Delta” had grossed over $40,000 by the time of her death. She owned and ran a dairy farm and nationally-known bakery, donated to orphanages, leased property, owned slaves, joined with business partners and brought lawsuits. Although Haughery accomplished much in her life, she is commonly remembered only for her benevolent work with orphans and the poor. In 1884, a statue of her, posed with orphans, was erected by the city’s elite, one of the earliest ...


Uncompromising Spirits: The Entwined Careers Of William Lloyd Garrison And Josephine Butler, Anne A. Salter, Charles O. Boyd May 2014

Uncompromising Spirits: The Entwined Careers Of William Lloyd Garrison And Josephine Butler, Anne A. Salter, Charles O. Boyd

Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research

William Lloyd Garrison and Josephine Butler challenged the political structures of their times. Both employed similar strategies to turn the mind set of American and British citizens. Garrison’s work as an American abolitionist inspired Butler and her work to repeal the Contagious Diseases Acts in Great Britain. Their life long commitment to liberty and justice was successful proving that one person can make a difference. Brief character sketches of each serve to revive interest in these important but somewhat neglected individuals.


Roosevelt, Boy Scouts, And The Formation Of Muscular Christian Character, Gordon J. Christen Apr 2014

Roosevelt, Boy Scouts, And The Formation Of Muscular Christian Character, Gordon J. Christen

Religious Studies Honors Projects

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, many prominent Christians and political leaders saw a degenerative influence in industrializing America. For them, urban culture had eroded gender roles, personal strength, and moral fiber. So-called “Muscular Christians” prescribed physical exertion and wilderness experience to cure these ills. I argue that these values were embodied in idealized characters such as Theodore Roosevelt, Jesus, and the Boy Scout to give a form to cultural remedies. In the process, they became the terms upon which proper Americanism, and proper Christianity, were constructed.


From Pants To Pearls: Rodgers And Hammerstein’S Affect On Post Wwii Women, Alison Dees Apr 2014

From Pants To Pearls: Rodgers And Hammerstein’S Affect On Post Wwii Women, Alison Dees

Georgia State Undergraduate Research Conference

No abstract provided.


Naccs 41st Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies Apr 2014

Naccs 41st Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies

NACCS Conference Programs

Fragmented Landscapes in Chicana and Chicano Studies: Deliberation, Innovation or Extinction?
April 9-12, 2014
Hilton Salt Lake City Center


A Changing Force: The American Civil War, Women, And Victorian Culture, Megan E. Mcnish Apr 2014

A Changing Force: The American Civil War, Women, And Victorian Culture, Megan E. Mcnish

Student Publications

The American Civil War thrust Victorian society into a maelstrom. The war disrupted a culture that was based on polite behavior and repression of desires. The emphasis on fulfilling duties sent hundreds of thousands of men into the ranks of Union and Confederate armies. Without the patriarchs of their families, women took up previously unexplored roles for the majority of their sex. In both the North and the South, females were compelled to do physical labor in the fields, runs shops, and manage slaves, all jobs which previously would have been occupied almost exclusively by men. These shifts in society ...


America's Forgotten Constitutions: Defiant Visions Of Power And Community, Robert Tsai Mar 2014

America's Forgotten Constitutions: Defiant Visions Of Power And Community, Robert Tsai

Robert L Tsai

The U.S. Constitution opens by proclaiming the sovereignty of all citizens: "We the People." Robert Tsai's gripping history of alternative constitutions invites readers into the circle of those who have rejected this ringing assertion--the defiant groups that refused to accept the Constitution's definition of who "the people" are and how their authority should be exercised. America's Forgotten Constitutions is the story of America as told by dissenters: squatters, Native Americans, abolitionists, socialists, internationalists, and racial nationalists. Beginning in the nineteenth century, Tsai chronicles eight episodes in which discontented citizens took the extraordinary step of drafting a ...


Race, Gender, And The Elusive Child, Lisa Kirschenbaum Mar 2014

Race, Gender, And The Elusive Child, Lisa Kirschenbaum

Lisa Kirschenbaum

No abstract provided.


Make Me A Sandwich: A Cultural History Of Domestic Kitchens In 19th Century America, Carter Goffigon Jan 2014

Make Me A Sandwich: A Cultural History Of Domestic Kitchens In 19th Century America, Carter Goffigon

American Studies Honors Papers

No abstract provided.


Sisterhood In The '60s: Joan, Peggy, And A Feminist Awakening, Tracy Lucht Jan 2014

Sisterhood In The '60s: Joan, Peggy, And A Feminist Awakening, Tracy Lucht

Journalism Publications

The period between World War II and the women's liberation movement was marked by palpable tension over social changes and gender ideology-an aspect of the postwar era well-known to historians but usually overlooked in the mass media. Television shows such as Leave It to Beaver (1957-1963), Father Knows Best (1954-1960), and The Adventures ofOzzie and Harriet (1952-1966) imagined a time that never existed, presenting the nation's women as domestic and suburban, happily embracing their roles as homemakers and submitting to their husband's authority (Coontz, 2000). This idyllic media memory, bequeathed to subsequent generations by reruns of these ...


Race, Religion, And Rights: Otherness Gone Mad, Tracy Lucht Jan 2014

Race, Religion, And Rights: Otherness Gone Mad, Tracy Lucht

Journalism Publications

Inevitable yet often unnamed, the looming political radicalism of the late 1960s acts as something like a silent partner in the Mad Men narrative, relying on viewers' historical knowledge of the social tension outside Sterling Cooper to underscore the contrived nature of the world within it. Just as the series spans the period between the emergence of liberal and radical white feminist discourses, it also bridges key moments in the civil rights movement, from the boycotts, voter registration drives, and sweeping oratory of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., to the assassinations of civil rights leaders and activists; rioting in ...


Atatürk's Balancing Act: The Role Of Secularism In Turkey, Patrick G. Rear Jan 2014

Atatürk's Balancing Act: The Role Of Secularism In Turkey, Patrick G. Rear

Global Tides

The intersection of religion and politics in the form of a civil religion has been present since time immemorial. This paper looks specifically to the relationship between Turkey’s development of a secular civil religion after gaining independence and the advancing of women’s rights and democratic values. In examining the intersections of state and religion in a secular Islamic society, it draws parallels to the French civil religion as it came to be following the French Revolution. Though Atatürk and other secularists were strong forces in developing the civil religion, the paper also examines liberal democratic and conservative Islamic ...


Keeping House On The Comstock: Irish Immigrant Women In Nevada, 1850-1880, Christina M. Thompson Jan 2014

Keeping House On The Comstock: Irish Immigrant Women In Nevada, 1850-1880, Christina M. Thompson

Calvert Undergraduate Research Awards

The lives of Irish immigrant women in Nevada during the mid-nineteenth century have not been studied at great length to date. This project attempts to explore the relationship that these women had with their communities, their families, and themselves while comparing their experiences to the lives of Irish immigrant women living in the larger Irish communities located on the east coast of the United States.


Quantitative Literacy And The Humanities, Rachel Chrastil Jan 2014

Quantitative Literacy And The Humanities, Rachel Chrastil

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Finding The Witch’S Mark: Female Participation In The Judicial System During The Hopkins Trials 1645-47, Shannon M. Lundquist Jan 2014

Finding The Witch’S Mark: Female Participation In The Judicial System During The Hopkins Trials 1645-47, Shannon M. Lundquist

Departmental Honors Projects

Between the years of 1645 and 1647 in East Anglia, a series of witch trials known as the Hopkins Trials took place. In all, 250 witches were accused and 100 hanged. The ability to convict a person of the crime of witchcraft relied heavily on evidence which was hard to come by given the nature of the crime of witchcraft. Tangible proof of an intangible crime was needed; this came in the form of witch’s marks. To the learned population, marks were a symbol of the witch’s covenant with the devil. To the lay person, they were called ...


Rochester Reform Trail Source Inventory, Garrett W. Roe Jan 2014

Rochester Reform Trail Source Inventory, Garrett W. Roe

The Rochester Reform Trail

The source inventory is a great document to aid in research pertaining to the many reform efforts in early 19th century Western New York. Since the time of creation, some of the digital links may no longer work due to website updates and discontinuation of others. Please note that the author does not take credit for any sources herein. This document is only a reference guide to other sources.