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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Social History

“Maintaining Mythic Property”: The Lost History Of Louis Allard And His Grave In New Orleans City Park, Kimberly H. Jochum Aug 2013

“Maintaining Mythic Property”: The Lost History Of Louis Allard And His Grave In New Orleans City Park, Kimberly H. Jochum

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

No abstract provided.


"Listen To The Wild Discord": Jazz In The Chicago Defender And The Louisiana Weekly, 1925-1929, Sarah A. Waits May 2013

"Listen To The Wild Discord": Jazz In The Chicago Defender And The Louisiana Weekly, 1925-1929, Sarah A. Waits

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

This essay will use the views of two African American newspaper columnists, E. Belfield Spriggins of the Louisiana Weekly and Dave Peyton of the Chicago Defender, to argue that though New Orleans and Chicago both occupied a primary place in the history of jazz, in many ways jazz was initially met with ambivalence and suspicion. The struggle between the desire to highlight black achievement in music and the effort to adhere to tenets of middle class respectability play out in their columns. Despite historiographical writings to the contrary, these issues of the influence of jazz music on society were not ...


Patriot, Pet, And Pest: America Debates The Dog's Worth During World War I, Alison G. Laurence May 2013

Patriot, Pet, And Pest: America Debates The Dog's Worth During World War I, Alison G. Laurence

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

During World War I, dogs held a contradictory place in American society. These animals functioned simultaneously as patriots, pets, and pests. This essay surveys the ways in which dogs either contributed to the war effort or seemed to subvert it through their uselessness as companion animals and their predation as feral ones. Ultimately, even worsening conditions on the homefront could not cause the American public as a whole to consider surrendering its affection for these animals, including the worthless ones. In the face of impending legislation that threatened to eliminate man’s best friend as a war measure, the American ...