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2012

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Articles 1 - 30 of 326

Full-Text Articles in Social History

Two More Proclamations For A Special New Years Eve, John M. Rudy Dec 2012

Two More Proclamations For A Special New Years Eve, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

'In accordance, as I believe, with the will of our Heavenly Father, and by direction of your great and good friend, whose name you are all familiar with, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, and Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy, on the 1st day of January, 1863, you will be declared "for ever free."' [excerpt]


Resolute On The Eve Of Emancipation, John M. Rudy Dec 2012

Resolute On The Eve Of Emancipation, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

In the eyes of William Lloyd Garrison, Abraham Lincoln stood waffling on the issue of slavery in the early days of December 1862. To be quite fair, in Garrison's eyes nearly anyone aside from William Lloyd Garrison stood waffling on the issue of slavery most of the time. [excerpt]


Kings And Princes: Christmas In Gettysburg, 1862, John M. Rudy Dec 2012

Kings And Princes: Christmas In Gettysburg, 1862, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

In a house along the first block of the north side of Chambersburg Street, a small metallic ticking noise signaled change. The calendar read December 24th, 1862. The rhythmic tapping was a voice, reaching out in code along thin strips of metal dangling from poles running to the east out of town. Soon, "Hanover, York, Harrisburg, and Baltimore," were sending their glad tidings to Gettysburg's citizens. Then soon, Gettysburg found herself on that Christmas Eve connected, "with all the world and the rest of mankind," the Adams Sentinel reported. In the home of John Scott along Chambersburg Street, the ...


Homes Across The Border: Russian Summer Houses In The Karelian Isthmus And The Finnish State, 1917–1927, Kitty Lam Dec 2012

Homes Across The Border: Russian Summer Houses In The Karelian Isthmus And The Finnish State, 1917–1927, Kitty Lam

Faculty Publications & Research

At the end of the 19th century, numerous St. Petersburg residents established their summer homes in the Karelian Isthmus, a picturesque region in the Grand Duchy of Finland, an autonomous province of the Russian Empire. The ease of travel between the Russian imperial capital and the Finnish seaside towns contributed to this practice. After 1917, a new border regime delineated the nascent Finnish state from the equally new Russian/ Soviet state. This change displaced the majority of Russian proprietors, as well as those imperial subjects who rented vacation properties from local Finns. This article addresses how state-building practices distinguishing between ...


The Immigrant Woman:Jewish Assimilation In The Lower East Side Ghetto Of New York City, 1880-1914, Rachael Siegel Dec 2012

The Immigrant Woman:Jewish Assimilation In The Lower East Side Ghetto Of New York City, 1880-1914, Rachael Siegel

History Theses

This paper looks at the factors that affected the extent to which Eastern European Jewish women were able to assimilate into American society between 1880 and 1914. By 1920, approximately 45% of Eastern European Jewish immigrants resided in New York City, primarily on the lower East Side. The population density of the Lower East Side made it the most crowded neighborhood in the city, if not the world. Eastern European Jews, especially Russian Jews, comprised the largest number of immigrants to the United States.

When these immigrants moved into the safety of the United States, they transplanted the traditions of ...


“Respectably Dull”: Striptease, Tourism And Reform In Postwar New Orleans, Lauren E. Milner Dec 2012

“Respectably Dull”: Striptease, Tourism And Reform In Postwar New Orleans, Lauren E. Milner

University of New Orleans Theses and Dissertations

The French Quarter of New Orleans and its famous Bourbon Street receive millions of visitors each year and are the subjects of both scholarly study and the popular imagination. Bourbon Street’s history of striptease has largely been untouched by scholars. In the post-World War II period, nightclubs featuring striptease entertainment drew the attention of reform-minded city and police officials, who attempted to purge striptease from the city’s historic district in an effort to whitewash the city’s main tourist area and appeal to potential outside economic industrial opportunities. Through news articles, correspondence, tourism brochures, and published reports, this ...


Adventus: The Great Coming Of 1862, John M. Rudy Dec 2012

Adventus: The Great Coming Of 1862, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

A couple of weeks ago, I spent a weekend in Harpers Ferry helping to interpret that amazing place for the National Historical Park's annual Christmas 1864 event. One of the greatest joys of my desk job in interpretive training is getting back out into a parkscape to test out new ideas and practices. This time it gave me the chance to experiment out in the field, wearing the olde-timey clothes of the 1860s and discussing how hammers, anvils and black labor won the war through the U.S. Quartermasters Depot at Harpers Ferry. The event is amazingly fun and ...


We Are Also What We Eat With: A Review Of Consider The Fork: A History Of How We Cook And Eat By Bee Wilson, Claire Stewart Dec 2012

We Are Also What We Eat With: A Review Of Consider The Fork: A History Of How We Cook And Eat By Bee Wilson, Claire Stewart

Publications and Research

Consider the Fork: A History of How we Cook and Eat, by Bee Wilson discusses how kitchen tools and utensils are not mere inanimate objects. Rather, kitchen tools have shaped the way we cook, and fashioned the manner in which we eat and shaped our civilization in unexpected ways. A book review by Claire Stewart.


Idealization And Desire In The Hundred Acre Wood: A.A. Milne And Christopher (Robin), Laura Bright Dec 2012

Idealization And Desire In The Hundred Acre Wood: A.A. Milne And Christopher (Robin), Laura Bright

Laura E Bright

Argues that A.A. Milne's Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner represent the conscious rejection, unconscious reproduction, and re-imaging of the author's traumatic Victorian childhood.


Conclusion-Cola And Cartoons: A Showcase Of Freshman Research At Unlv, Cian T. Mcmahon Dec 2012

Conclusion-Cola And Cartoons: A Showcase Of Freshman Research At Unlv, Cian T. Mcmahon

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

The decisions we make about politics and society are influenced by what we see and hear in the news. That is why political cartoons are so important. They present clear opinions on complicated matters in ways that transcend everyday language.


“Where The Blame Lies”, Sahar Nawabzada Dec 2012

“Where The Blame Lies”, Sahar Nawabzada

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Judge Magazine on April 4th 1891, the cartoon Where the Blame Lies shows a flood of immigrants arriving to New York City while a disapproving Uncle Sam looks on at them. The cartoon shows a Supreme Court Judge that is imploring Uncle Sam to amend the constitution to restrict immigration. When looking at the immigrants themselves, each immigrant has words such as “Anarchist” or “Socialist” written on their clothing to convey the negative attributes immigrants bring to the country. On the stage is a piece of paper that reads “Mafia in New Orleans, Anarchists in Chicago, and Socialists ...


“The Propagation Society—More Free Than Welcome”, Arneisha Swanson Dec 2012

“The Propagation Society—More Free Than Welcome”, Arneisha Swanson

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

This cartoon was published independently by Nathanial Currier circa 1855. “The Propagation Society- More Free than Welcome” reflects the Americans point of view on the Irish Catholic immigrants in 1855. In the cartoon the priest is bombarding the Americans to step aside so that they can take over all spiritual welfare. Embedded into the cartoon is a message of an anti-Catholic group the “Know Nothings” and their attempt to get rid of the Irish Catholics.


Trail Blazer - Volume 115, Number 12, Morehead State University. Trail Blazer. Dec 2012

Trail Blazer - Volume 115, Number 12, Morehead State University. Trail Blazer.

Morehead State Trail Blazer Archive

Morehead State Trail Blazer published on December 6, 2012.


In Response To Kevin: Truncated And Sliced, John M. Rudy Dec 2012

In Response To Kevin: Truncated And Sliced, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

There is not one program given on any Civil War battle landscape that cannot, somewhere in it's natural flow and using resource-specific elements and tangibles, discuss the cause and context of the war in a meaningful and thematically-integrated way. Period. Full Stop.

Furthermore and because of this, there is no reason or excuse not to cover the cause and context of the war in a meaningful, thematically-integrated and site-specific way in every personal services program in some manner or fashion. Period. Full Stop. [excerpt]


Why Chinese Neo-Confucian Women Made A Fetish Of Small Feet, Aubrey L. Mcmahan Dec 2012

Why Chinese Neo-Confucian Women Made A Fetish Of Small Feet, Aubrey L. Mcmahan

Grand Valley Journal of History

Abstract for “Why Chinese Neo-Confucian Women Made a Fetish of Small Feet

This paper explores the source of the traditional practice of Chinese footbinding which first gained popularity at the end of the Tang dynasty and continued to flourish until the last half of the twentieth century.[1] Derived initially from court concubines whose feet were formed to represent an attractive “deer lady” from an Indian tale, footbinding became a wide-spread symbol among the Chinese of obedience, pecuniary reputability, and Confucianism, among other things.[2],[3] Drawing on the analyses of such scholars as Beverly Jackson, Valerie Steele and John ...


Supporting Caste: The Origins Of Racism In Colonial Virginia, Patrick D. Anderson Dec 2012

Supporting Caste: The Origins Of Racism In Colonial Virginia, Patrick D. Anderson

Grand Valley Journal of History

In 17th century Virginia, lower class whites and blacks coordinated on multiple occasions to resist the power of the ruling class elites. By the late 19th century, white laborers viewed the newly freed slaves through racist precepts and the two groups clashed on a regular basis. The aim of this essay is to explain how the shift from racial solidarity to racial antagonism occurred. Racist ideology originated in the minds of the elites and they attempted to separate the restless lower class along racial lines, first, by legal reforms, second, by creating a separate class of enslaved blacks. Anti-black racism ...


Day Of The Woman?: Feminism & Rape-Revenge Films, Kayley A. Viteo Dec 2012

Day Of The Woman?: Feminism & Rape-Revenge Films, Kayley A. Viteo

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

This thesis examines the horror film sub-genre of ‘rape revenge’ for the ways it reflects and helps to constitute broader public debates about women and feminism. In order to do so, it examines two well-known representatives of the sub-genre, Last House on the Left and I Spit On Your Grave. Both of these films were initially made in 1972 and 1978 respectively and were recently remade in 2009 and 2010. This thesis examines both the originals and the remakes of these films within and against their socio-historical context, with a specific focus on dominant discussions about feminism and women taking ...


Aa Ms 06 Home Is Where I Make It - Oral History Collection Finding Aid, Marieke Van Der Steenhoven Dec 2012

Aa Ms 06 Home Is Where I Make It - Oral History Collection Finding Aid, Marieke Van Der Steenhoven

Search the Manuscript Collection (Finding Aids)

Description:

This oral history project was directed by Dr. Maureen Elgersman Lee, of USM, and Rachel Talbot Ross. The interviews were conducted by local high school students. The Collection includes transcripts, photographs and audiotapes from the two phases of the project, which documented African American life in the Greater Portland and Lewiston-Auburn areas.

Date Range:

2001-2003

Size of Collection:

1 ft.


The African-American Struggle For Equality: Two Divergent Approaches, Steven Washington Dec 2012

The African-American Struggle For Equality: Two Divergent Approaches, Steven Washington

Theses

This paper focuses on two leaders and how their divergent strategies for one goal led to them working together without actively coordinating their efforts. The research conducted in the paper is based primarily on the writings of Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. Du Bois. It examines their upbringing and their views on education, labor and voting rights.


Foreword, Amy C. Gaudion Nov 2012

Foreword, Amy C. Gaudion

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

No abstract provided.


Spielberg's Dead Wrong About The Dead; Or, The Places In The Movie Where I Cried, John M. Rudy Nov 2012

Spielberg's Dead Wrong About The Dead; Or, The Places In The Movie Where I Cried, John M. Rudy

Interpreting the Civil War: Connecting the Civil War to the American Public

I stood in front of the rostrum in the National Cemetery with my parents. They hadn't seen the movie yet. My best-friend was next to them. He hadn't seen it yet. Another compatriot joined us who had seen it, but we were definitely outnumbered in our little knot of folks within the massive crowd. As Spielberg continued speaking, I leaned in to the group. "You really need to see the movie," I said, knowing that no matter whose ears it hit the odds were it'd hit a meaningful target. [excerpt]


Jlia Editorial Board & Staff Nov 2012

Jlia Editorial Board & Staff

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

No abstract provided.


To Forgive And Forget: How Reconciliation And Amnesty Legislation In Afghanistan Forgives War Criminals While Forgetting Their Victims, Sara L. Carlson Nov 2012

To Forgive And Forget: How Reconciliation And Amnesty Legislation In Afghanistan Forgives War Criminals While Forgetting Their Victims, Sara L. Carlson

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

More than three decades of war and hundreds of thousands killed or brutalized by the actions of warlords and insurgent commanders vying for power comprise the backdrop of modern Afghanistan. As Afghanistan continues toward a new era, seeking democracy in a country where tribal affiliations and ethnic groups often usurp any sense of patriotism, the reconciliation of armed fighters while providing an adequate grievance process for victims of war crimes must take priority in the process adopted to unify the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. This comment explores the current attempt by the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to provide a system ...


International Activity And Domestic Law, Adam I. Muchmore Nov 2012

International Activity And Domestic Law, Adam I. Muchmore

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

This essay explores the ways States use their domestic laws to regulate activities that cross national borders. Domestic-law enforcement decisions play an underappreciated role in the development of international regulatory policy, particularly in situations where the enforcing State's power to apply its law extraterritorially is not contested. Collective action problems suggest there will be an undersupply of enforcement decisions that promote global welfare and an oversupply of enforcement decisions that promote national welfare. These collective action problems may be mitigated in part by government networks and other forms of regulatory cooperation.


The Full Story Of United States V. Smith, America’S Most Important Piracy Case, Joel H. Samuels Nov 2012

The Full Story Of United States V. Smith, America’S Most Important Piracy Case, Joel H. Samuels

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

This article explores the seminal United States Supreme Court decision of United States v. Smith (1820). Smith, an early piracy case, has influenced developments in both domestic and international law on piracy, universal jurisdiction, and a range of broader themes. This article is the first to explore the context within which the case arose, as well as the circumstances of the case itself. In addition to the details of the case, the story of the men prosecuted for their cruise aboard the vessel known as the Irresistible in the late spring and early summer of 1819 also offers a window ...


Remarks On Counterstrike, Eric Schmitt Nov 2012

Remarks On Counterstrike, Eric Schmitt

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

After 9/11, the United States government was forced to think differently about terrorism and the nation’s ability to respond to attacks. Eric Schmitt and Thom Shanker address many of the intricacies faced by officials at the White House, the State Department and the Pentagon in their book Counterstrike. In this essay, transcribed from remarks given on March 21, 2012 at the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues at Dickinson College, Schmitt discusses how the U.S. government’s policies toward Al Qaeda and terrorism in general have evolved in the ten-year period following the attacks.


Remarks, The Big Picture: Beyond Hot Spots & Crises In Our Interconnected World, Anne-Marie Slaughter Nov 2012

Remarks, The Big Picture: Beyond Hot Spots & Crises In Our Interconnected World, Anne-Marie Slaughter

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

The picture of foreign policy as seen by the United States has changed dramatically over the last few decades. The United States now faces a world far more interconnected and integrated than the foreign policy landscape of the Cold War and its immediate aftermath. Instead of one or two super power centers, the world today is made up of multiple global and regional power centers. This essay, transcribed and adapted from remarks given by Anne-Marie Slaughter on March 15, 2012, at the Dickinson School of Law of the Pennsylvania State University, examines the shift to a multi-polar world of foreign ...


International Order After The Financial Crisis, Harold James Nov 2012

International Order After The Financial Crisis, Harold James

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

How is international order built, and how is it legitimate, in a world in which political and economic foundations are rapidly shifting? What are the consequences of the rise of major new powers for the structure and the functioning of the international system? Great wars or great financial crises have in the past led to disorientation about the moral foundations of society, domestically and internationally. The paper examines parallels with the Great Depression, and in particular the weakening of multilateralism and of small political units, and the strengthening of large powers with hegemonic claims. The paper then turns to an ...


The Growing Dark Side Of Cyberspace ( . . . And What To Do About It), Ronald Deibert Nov 2012

The Growing Dark Side Of Cyberspace ( . . . And What To Do About It), Ronald Deibert

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

Cyberspace – the global environment of digital communications – surrounds and embodies us entirely, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We are always on, always connected: emailing, texting, searching, networking, and sharing are all now as commonplace as eating, breathing, and sleeping. But there is a dark side to cyberspace - hidden contests and malicious threats - that is growing like a disease from the inside-out. This disease has many symptoms, and is being reinforced by a multiplicity of disparate but mutually reinforcing causes. Some of these driving forces are unintended byproducts of the new digital universe into which we have thrust ...


The Rise Of Transparency And The Decline Of Secrecy In The Age Of Global And Social Media, P.J. Crowley Nov 2012

The Rise Of Transparency And The Decline Of Secrecy In The Age Of Global And Social Media, P.J. Crowley

Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs

News reporting of a wide range of sensitive government policies, operations, and internal deliberations has raised understandable concerns that U.S. national security is being compromised. In response, there is an increase in investigations and prosecutions and proposed legislation to plug government leaks. But a broader reality may be at work. In the increasingly interconnected and transparent world of the Internet, Facebook, Twitter, satellite television, WikiLeaks, omniscient cellphones and technology-enhanced revolutions such as the Arab Awakening, governments have lost their ability to control the flow of information. More people have access to more information, with the ability to communicate anything ...