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University of Nevada, Las Vegas

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Social History

Conclusion-Cola And Cartoons: A Showcase Of Freshman Research At Unlv, Cian T. Mcmahon Dec 2012

Conclusion-Cola And Cartoons: A Showcase Of Freshman Research At Unlv, Cian T. Mcmahon

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

The decisions we make about politics and society are influenced by what we see and hear in the news. That is why political cartoons are so important. They present clear opinions on complicated matters in ways that transcend everyday language.


“The Propagation Society—More Free Than Welcome”, Arneisha Swanson Dec 2012

“The Propagation Society—More Free Than Welcome”, Arneisha Swanson

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

This cartoon was published independently by Nathanial Currier circa 1855. “The Propagation Society- More Free than Welcome” reflects the Americans point of view on the Irish Catholic immigrants in 1855. In the cartoon the priest is bombarding the Americans to step aside so that they can take over all spiritual welfare. Embedded into the cartoon is a message of an anti-Catholic group the “Know Nothings” and their attempt to get rid of the Irish Catholics.


“Where The Blame Lies”, Sahar Nawabzada Dec 2012

“Where The Blame Lies”, Sahar Nawabzada

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Judge Magazine on April 4th 1891, the cartoon Where the Blame Lies shows a flood of immigrants arriving to New York City while a disapproving Uncle Sam looks on at them. The cartoon shows a Supreme Court Judge that is imploring Uncle Sam to amend the constitution to restrict immigration. When looking at the immigrants themselves, each immigrant has words such as “Anarchist” or “Socialist” written on their clothing to convey the negative attributes immigrants bring to the country. On the stage is a piece of paper that reads “Mafia in New Orleans, Anarchists in Chicago, and Socialists ...