Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Portland State University

Discipline
Keyword
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 64

Full-Text Articles in Social History

The Evolution Of Slavery-Built Higher Education And Racial Supremacy In American Universities, Olivia A. Ricketts May 2019

The Evolution Of Slavery-Built Higher Education And Racial Supremacy In American Universities, Olivia A. Ricketts

Young Historians Conference

This paper discusses the connections between American universities and the institution of slavery. It examines four universities connections that were funded in different eras of United States history, including Harvard and Yale in the Colonial Era, University of Chicago in the Antebellum Era, and the University of Oregon in Post-Reconstruction Era, as well as what they are currently doing in the form of reparations. The thesis of the paper is that through the history of the United States, the level of association between slavery and universities decreases, due to the rise of abolitionist ideals.


Depiction And Function Of Madness In Elizabethan And Jacobean Literature, Yeiji Seo May 2019

Depiction And Function Of Madness In Elizabethan And Jacobean Literature, Yeiji Seo

Young Historians Conference

Since the ancient times of Israel, Greece, and Rome, people with mental illnesses have been regarded as different from others in society. This paper aims to analyze the motives of authors of medical and dramatic texts of Elizabethan and Jacobean literature in regards to mental illness by specifically observing William Shakespeare’s King Lear and Robert Burton’s The Anatomy of Melancholy. This paper also considers the views of other scholars of the field to compose a complete insight on Shakespeare and Burton’s goals in depicting mental illness and finally advocates further research and understanding to positively contribute towards ...


Feminism During The Russian Revolution: A Failure On Multiple Fronts, Helen R. Rossmiller Apr 2018

Feminism During The Russian Revolution: A Failure On Multiple Fronts, Helen R. Rossmiller

Young Historians Conference

Although not always acknowledged for their contributions, women were not only a significant force in the Russian Revolution, they were the impetus behind it. Following the revolution however, feminist ideals were neglected by the new Soviet government and whatever feminist policies or ideals existed were reduced to mere illusion. Female liberation was a central goal for most female revolutionaries; yet, they were unable to accomplish it in a lasting and universal way. Nevertheless, an understanding of the Russian revolution without an acknowledgment of the influence of both aristocratic and working-class women who joined the Revolution would be incomplete. Women such ...


Women Of The West: Prostitutes And Madams, Emma R. Marek Apr 2018

Women Of The West: Prostitutes And Madams, Emma R. Marek

Young Historians Conference

During the late 1800s, the institution of prostitution flourished unlike ever before as America fulfilled its “Manifest Destiny.” Amidst predominantly male industries, women found prostitution a unique opportunity to survive in the developing and wild western society. The topic of this paper addresses these women, this under celebrated group, and their contribution to the development of the American West. This paper will argue that during the 19th century, prostitutes and madams contributed immensely to the economic, social, and legal developments of the Western Frontier. Brothels became integral for the economic discourse of businessmen. Their dually criminal and civil position ...


The Influence Of The Stonewall Riots, Leah K. Rosenbaum Apr 2018

The Influence Of The Stonewall Riots, Leah K. Rosenbaum

Young Historians Conference

For decades, the rights of the members of the LGBTQ community were oppressed without major objections from the American public, until June 28, 1969. The Stonewall Riots in Greenwich Village, New York marked the beginning of a radicalized movement for equal rights within the LGBTQ community. Newspapers nationwide, printed articles about the riots, some condemning the participants, and others praising the men and women for standing up against the police. On the one year anniversary of the riots, the first gay pride march happened in various cities across the country.


Visions Of Indecency: The Intersection Between The Church And Prostitution In Augsburg, Rome, And Southwark From The Twelfth To Seventeenth Century Ce, Samantha Leahy Apr 2018

Visions Of Indecency: The Intersection Between The Church And Prostitution In Augsburg, Rome, And Southwark From The Twelfth To Seventeenth Century Ce, Samantha Leahy

Young Historians Conference

The following research paper endeavors to present and enhance knowledge on the relationship between the Roman Catholic Church and prostitution across Italy, England, and Germany from the 12th to the 17th century CE. The paper traces the Church’s opinion of reluctant tolerance prostitution to openly condemning it and argues that this ecclesiastical shift can be traced to various syphilitic breakouts that occurred in association with the Columbian Exchange and the growing popularity of Prostitute Reform Houses. The paper argues that these aspects of European history, in conjunction with the increased influence of Protestant Reformers in the 16th century, expedited ...


"If Only I Could Get A Job Somewhere:" The Emergence Of British Punk, Nina Fletcher Apr 2018

"If Only I Could Get A Job Somewhere:" The Emergence Of British Punk, Nina Fletcher

Young Historians Conference

In the seventies, Great Britain was crippled by a widespread recession during which more than a million people were out of work and the inflation rate rose to above 18 percent, a stark contrast with the generally prosperous economy of the sixties. The conditions of this difficult decade would result in lasting social and cultural developments — including, of course, punk rock in all its loud, cynical, and spiky-haired glory. This paper examines the economic origins of the punk movement and argues that it was, at heart, the unique product of a generation raised in times of hardship and scarce opportunity ...


Truth, Fiction, And Image: Napoleon Bonaparte And The Changing Tides Of Political Imagination, Isabel K. Williams Apr 2018

Truth, Fiction, And Image: Napoleon Bonaparte And The Changing Tides Of Political Imagination, Isabel K. Williams

Young Historians Conference

Despite nearly two centuries having passed since his death, Napoleon Bonaparte still looms large in western political imagery. Napoleon utilized state sponsored art and propagandists like Jacques-Louis David, Antoine-Jean Gros, and Jean Auguste-Dominique Ingres to enhance his public image and promote him as a calm and talented military leader, a dedicated public servant, and even a saint. However, after his defeat at Waterloo, his exile, and death, Bonaparte’s artistic representation shifted to one of a dejected, almost tragic ruler. This shift to a negative and reflective portrayal of the Emperor can be most clearly seen in the works of ...


African Americans In Portland, A History Of Displacement And Exclusion, Brock Gjesdal Apr 2018

African Americans In Portland, A History Of Displacement And Exclusion, Brock Gjesdal

Young Historians Conference

Throughout the history of Portland, African Americans living within the city have been subject to discrimination and hardship by the hand of whites living among them, but not willing to live beside them. For this reason, whites enforced housing regulations to concentrate most of the African Americans living in Portland into the Northeast reaches of the city, more specifically the Albina District. However, as African American inequality in Portland gathered more and more recognition, the blunt racism embodied by the restrictive housing covenants that had been imposed upon African Americans for decades became less and less acceptable by the 1950s ...


An Examination Of American Isolationism Through Public Opinion, 1935-1939, Maggie S. Wu Apr 2018

An Examination Of American Isolationism Through Public Opinion, 1935-1939, Maggie S. Wu

Young Historians Conference

The 1930’s saw the widespread use of public opinion polling as a way to inform lawmakers and the general public alike of where the masses stood on issues. These polls, paired with newspapers and magazines from the time period, offer a rich glimpse into 1930’s United States. This paper will pull on this extensive pool of primary sources to illustrate the story of the United States’ shift from isolationism to interventionism in the era of Nazi Germany, appeasement, and World War II.


The Rise Of Gay Culture And Why Portland Is Different, Lucas Y. Morimoto Apr 2018

The Rise Of Gay Culture And Why Portland Is Different, Lucas Y. Morimoto

Young Historians Conference

This paper serves as a short history of the gay movement in Portland, as well as the reasons why Portland’s movement was inherently dissimilar to the movements of other major cities. It begins by providing historical context on the movements of some of Americas biggest cities, focusing primarily on the 1969 events of the Stonewall Riots in New York, the election and assassination of Harvey Milk in San Francisco, and Seattle’s movement for the purpose of comparison. A brief history on homosexuality in Portland’s recent past follows, going on then to the influence of “Darcelle’s” for ...


Working-Class Black Women’S Role In Building And Sustaining Black Communities In The Pacific Northwest, Tessara G. Dudley May 2017

Working-Class Black Women’S Role In Building And Sustaining Black Communities In The Pacific Northwest, Tessara G. Dudley

Student Research Symposium

In response to the scholarly focus on the historical racism of the Pacific Northwest, this research attempts to answer the question of how Black communities have persisted in the face of discrimination. This study is a historical examination of the roles that Black women have played in building and sustaining Black communities within predominantly white regions, with a specific focus on the Portland-Vancouver area during and after World War II. This work focuses on the activities of working class Black women, a significant proportion of Black women migrating to the Pacific Northwest during World War II, examining their community-building activities ...


“A Curiosity Which Has Many Eyes”: Ante-Nicene Church Fathers’ Attitudes Towards Bathing, Lilian C. Chan Apr 2017

“A Curiosity Which Has Many Eyes”: Ante-Nicene Church Fathers’ Attitudes Towards Bathing, Lilian C. Chan

Young Historians Conference

Ancient Rome was known for its extravagant public bathhouses. However, as medieval values began to emerge in Ante-Nicene Rome, the Church Fathers condemned the public and mixed-gender nature of these bathhouses. The bathhouses were declared unchaste, immoral, and unhealthy. The reasons the Church Fathers condemned bathing reveal the stringency of the Ante-Nicene Church towards even long-held traditions. However, these reasonings go beyond religious implications and also provide insight into the medical knowledge and sexism in Ante-Nicene Rome.


Paving The Pathway For Loving V. Virginia, Maia L. Insinga Apr 2017

Paving The Pathway For Loving V. Virginia, Maia L. Insinga

Young Historians Conference

Interracial marriage laws have burdened jubilant couples throughout America’s history, making the stories of those that fought against the unjust laws a necessary topic of research. This paper discusses the history of Loving v. Virginia, a Supreme Court case that repealed all remaining interracial marriage laws on April 10, 1967, when the Court sided with the Loving couple. The credit of this event cannot be given entirely to the Lovings and their lawyers appeals to the Supreme Court, therefore this paper reviews supplementary events, court cases, research and media influences that paved the pathway to the ultimate decision of ...


Breaking Boundaries: The Worth Of Women In The Merovingian Period, Rachel R. Mckinnon Apr 2016

Breaking Boundaries: The Worth Of Women In The Merovingian Period, Rachel R. Mckinnon

Young Historians Conference

In a world run by men, the question of a woman’s role in society is always relevant. Were women allowed basic rights? Were they generally respected and considered essential to society? Was there a difference in treatment based on class? The upper-class women of the Merovingians, a dynasty lasting from 457-751 CE, were viewed merely with the degrading expectations that the patriarchy allowed them. They were extremely limited and generally not respected. However, Queen Radegund’s life and accomplishments suggest that upper-class women still yearned for a more meaningful life. Radegund demonstrates the desire women had to prove their ...


Music In The Hapsburg Empire 1750-1850, Alexander S. Klas Apr 2016

Music In The Hapsburg Empire 1750-1850, Alexander S. Klas

Young Historians Conference

This paper examines the role of music within the Habsburg empire in the century between 1750 and 1850. Music was used as a political tool beginning in the reign of Empress Maria Theresa to incite hostility against foreign enemies, reinforce public perception of the Habsburgs as leaders of the German nation, and stifle revolutionary sentiments among the populace. Drawing upon biographies and analysis of composers found in the Milton Cross' Encyclopedia of the Great Composers and their Music by Milton Cross and David Ewen from throughout the period, this paper demonstrates that patronage of music gave the Habsburgs a way ...


Questions Of Citizenship: Oregonian Reactions To Japanese Immigrants' Quest For Naturalization Rights In The United States, 1894-1952, Alison Leigh Jessie Dec 2015

Questions Of Citizenship: Oregonian Reactions To Japanese Immigrants' Quest For Naturalization Rights In The United States, 1894-1952, Alison Leigh Jessie

Dissertations and Theses

This study examines the discrimination against Japanese immigrants in U.S. naturalization law up to 1952 and how it was covered in the Oregonian newspaper, one of the oldest and most widely read newspapers on the West Coast. The anti-Japanese movement was much larger in California, but this paper focuses on the attitudes in Oregon, which at times echoed sentiments in California but at other times conveyed support for Japanese naturalization. Naturalization laws at the turn of the century were vague, leaving the task of defining who was white, and thus eligible for naturalization, to the courts. Japanese applicants were ...


The Floating Men: Portland And The Hobo Menace, 1890-1915, Marin Elizabeth Aurand Jun 2015

The Floating Men: Portland And The Hobo Menace, 1890-1915, Marin Elizabeth Aurand

Dissertations and Theses

At the beginning of the twentieth century, transient laborers in Portland, Oregon faced marginalization and exploitation at the hands of the classes that relied on them for their own prosperity. Portland at this time was poised to flourish as a major population and industrial center of the American West. The industries that fueled the city's growth were dependent on cheap and mobile manual labor made available by the expansion of the nation's railroads. As the city prospered and grew, the elite of the city created and promoted an image of Portland as an Eden of material abundance where ...


The Limits Of Tolerance: The Equal Treatment Act And Discrimination In The Netherlands, Dylan E. Wells Apr 2015

The Limits Of Tolerance: The Equal Treatment Act And Discrimination In The Netherlands, Dylan E. Wells

Young Historians Conference

The Netherlands has a reputation for being one of the most liberal and accepting nations in the world. However, when analyzing the traditions, politics, education, and other aspects of everyday life in the country, a long-lasting history of racism and prejudice is revealed. This paper explores the possible reasons for inequality in the Netherlands, and the Equal Treatment Act of 1994, the first explicit Dutch anti-discrimination legislation. This paper will discuss the potential reasons why the Equal Treatment Act ultimately failed to curb bias based on race, ethnicity, and religion—challenges still faced by many in the Netherlands today, twenty ...


Inevitable Rebellion: Jacobite Risings And The Union Of 1707, Lindsay E. Swanson Apr 2015

Inevitable Rebellion: Jacobite Risings And The Union Of 1707, Lindsay E. Swanson

Young Historians Conference

In the beginning of the 18th century, the landscape of Europe was changed with the proposal of legislation to unite Scotland and England. While the Union of 1707 served as an important starting point in the English quest for unification, it was not powerful enough to truly prevent insurgency among Scottish natives. This paper explores the problems associated with and Scottish opposition to the Union of 1707, and the measures it took to truly join the two nations under the name Great Britain. It also highlights the endurance of a Scottish identity, examining resistance to empires and questioning the longevity ...


The Irish Hunger And Its Alignments With The 1948 Genocide Convention, Larissa M. Banitt Apr 2015

The Irish Hunger And Its Alignments With The 1948 Genocide Convention, Larissa M. Banitt

Young Historians Conference

The Irish Hunger of the mid nineteenth century began when a potato blight ruined most of Ireland's crop. While this was indeed a natural crisis, Britain's ineffective response exacerbated the sugaring the Irish endured. Widespread discrimination of the Irish, economic and moral ideologies all contributed to the British government's reaction to the famine. This paper evaluates how British adherence to these ideologies increased Irish suffering and aligns with the definition of genocide as defined by the 1948 Genocide Convention


Rocking The Third Republic: The Succession Of Political Crises That Led To The Rise Of Xenophobic Nationalism In France, Sophia Deleonibus Apr 2015

Rocking The Third Republic: The Succession Of Political Crises That Led To The Rise Of Xenophobic Nationalism In France, Sophia Deleonibus

Young Historians Conference

In July of 2014, demonstrations in Paris against Israel's action in Gaza turned violent. The growing strength of anti-Zionism in France, as indicated through recent events, has led to a fear that anti-Zionism is bringing back the anti-Semitism of yore. Throughout the past century, the level of intolerance towards Jews and any outsiders has become an unseemly component of French culture, notably illustrated through the evolution of a nationalistic outlook in France. This paper explores the beginnings of this modern nationalism and traces its origins to the French loss of the Franco-Prussian War of 1870 and the subsequent rise ...


Christianity's Influence On Attitudes Toward Homosexuality In The Roman Empire, Jennie Jiang Apr 2015

Christianity's Influence On Attitudes Toward Homosexuality In The Roman Empire, Jennie Jiang

Young Historians Conference

Attitudes towards sexuality are deeply influenced by the intricate interplay between religion and social values. How do polytheistic and monotheistic societies differ in how they view sexuality? In the pre-Christian days of the early Roman Empire, polytheism fostered a remarkable tolerance toward both same-sex relations and various expressions of sexuality, as evident in social expectations, literature, and written law. In contrast, a closer examination of the Roman Empire’s transition from a polytheistic to Christian society in the 4th and 5th centuries reveals that the rise of Christianity corresponded with, and likely contributed to, increasingly strict attitudes towards ...


Power Structure, Nathaniel Klein Apr 2015

Power Structure, Nathaniel Klein

Young Historians Conference

By today's standards morally reprehensible subjects are difficult to examine, however, from a historical perspective topics such as infanticide offer insight into individual behavior, therefore reflecting societal norms. This paper explores the practice of infanticide used during the course of the 7th century BCE to reinforce the power structures of the period. Infanticide was far more than a simple way to dispose of unwanted offspring; it was a tool that was used by ancient Greek societies to maintain systems of control and promote social values upon which society depended.


"Children Need Protection Not Perversion": The Rise Of The New Right And The Politicization Of Morality In Sex Education In Great Britain, 1968-1989, Miriam Corinne Morehart Mar 2015

"Children Need Protection Not Perversion": The Rise Of The New Right And The Politicization Of Morality In Sex Education In Great Britain, 1968-1989, Miriam Corinne Morehart

Dissertations and Theses

Two competing forms of sex education and the groups supporting them came to head in the 1970s and 1980s. Traditional sex education retained an emphasis on maintaining Christian-based morality through marriage and parenthood preparation that sex education originally held since the beginning of the twentieth century. Liberal sex education developed to openly discuss issues that reflected recent legal and social changes. This form reviewed controversial subjects including abortion, contraception and homosexuality. Though liberal sex education found support from national family planning organizations and Labour politicians, traditional sex education found a more vocal and powerful ally in the New Right.

This ...


Oh Project: Healing From Cambodian Genocide Headnote, Patricia A. Schechter Sep 2014

Oh Project: Healing From Cambodian Genocide Headnote, Patricia A. Schechter

Oral History Interviews

This brief essay introduces the "The OH Project: Healing from Cambodian Genocide." The OH Project interviews were conducted in Portland, Oregon in the Spring of 2009. The project was developed by the Cambodian American Community of Oregon, a non-profit organization that provides cultural activities and social support to families and children. The purpose was to conduct intergenerational interviews between youth and elders in order to transmit to pass heritage from the migrating generation to youth born in the United States, and to use storytelling to help narrators heal from wartime trauma. Participants attended oral history workshops at PSU in order ...


An Investigation Into Zionism’S Inner Leadership, Zia L. Klocke Apr 2014

An Investigation Into Zionism’S Inner Leadership, Zia L. Klocke

Young Historians Conference

No abstract provided.


The Power Of The People In Influencing The British Government: The Kindertransport, Sophia Cantwell Apr 2014

The Power Of The People In Influencing The British Government: The Kindertransport, Sophia Cantwell

Young Historians Conference

The Kindertransport was a program implemented by Britain throughout Europe during World War II to save thousands of persecuted Jewish children. While the British Parliament ultimately passed the movement as a bill and allowed it, the credit and work behind the movement belongs to the Quakers and various Jewish figures of authority in Britain. This paper explores the birth of this movement, its successes and struggles, and its lasting impact on the world today. Without the determination of a few willing people, thousands of lives would have perished during World War II.


Griswold V. Connecticut: A Study Of Resistance To Sexual Revolution In Connecticut, 1961, Natalie Pearson Apr 2014

Griswold V. Connecticut: A Study Of Resistance To Sexual Revolution In Connecticut, 1961, Natalie Pearson

Young Historians Conference

No abstract provided.


Institutionalization In The Palestinian Refugee Camps Of Lebanon, Devon Woznack Jan 2014

Institutionalization In The Palestinian Refugee Camps Of Lebanon, Devon Woznack

Anthós

Immediately following the Arab-Israeli war of 1948, the majority of Palestinians were expelled from Israel. They fled and settled as refugees in camps throughout the Middle East, including several in Lebanon. This event came to be known to them as al-nakba, or the catastrophe. Since then, many changes in leadership have plagued the Lebanese camps, each further institutionalizing the camps and services. These changes, combined with dwindling resources and discrimination by the Lebanese government, have created a hostile environment for the refugees. This institutionalization can be seen in several ways: via the establishment of aid organizations to control, monitor and ...