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Articles 1 - 29 of 29

Full-Text Articles in Medieval History

The Glossa Ordinaria Manuscripts Of The Biblioteca Capitolare Of Monza, E. Ann Matter Jan 2019

The Glossa Ordinaria Manuscripts Of The Biblioteca Capitolare Of Monza, E. Ann Matter

Manuscript Studies

The Historia de los Reyes Moros de Granada, written by the chronicler Hernando de Baeza in the first half of the XVI century, in Spain, is a valuable text that provides a very different perspective from other late medieval Spanish official chronicles. This article provides an account of the discovery of a previously unknown manuscript of this chronicle which, unlike the two others already known, is complete and includes the ending, which narrates the negotiations between the Catholic Kings of Spain and the last Nasrid sultan Boabdil for the Islamic surrender of Granada. The article describes this previously unknown manuscript ...


Conversational Lollardy: Reading The Margins Of Ms Bodley 978, Elizabeth Schirmer Jan 2019

Conversational Lollardy: Reading The Margins Of Ms Bodley 978, Elizabeth Schirmer

Manuscript Studies

Considers an unusual set of “key-object” annotations, pictorial as well as verbal, that appear in the margins of the Middle English gospel harmony Oon of Foure in Bodleian Library, MS Bodley 978. Argues that the margins of Bodley 978 record a variety of conversations shaped by lollardy. After briefly locating the Bodley manuscript in relation to the larger Oon of Foure tradition, the article proceeds by tracing a set of often-repeated annotative objects across the Bodley margins—key, sword, cross, lantern, heart. Taking these messy and amateurish finding aids seriously as intellectual work, it finds the primary Bodley annotator(s ...


Statim Prosequi: An Index As A Product, Instrument, And Medium Of The Medieval Franciscan Inquisition In Tuscany, Geoffrey W. Clement Jan 2019

Statim Prosequi: An Index As A Product, Instrument, And Medium Of The Medieval Franciscan Inquisition In Tuscany, Geoffrey W. Clement

Manuscript Studies

Codex Casanatensis Ms. 1730 is a compendious work containing a wide assortment of texts related to the medieval inquisition. This codex was conceived and executed as an unitary whole, and produced in the early fourteenth century for Franciscan inquisitors in Tuscany. While many texts in Casanatensis 1730 appear in other inquisitors’ codices, there are also texts that are unique to Ms. 1730. Among these is an index at the start (fol. 1-37) that not only covers Casanatensis 1730 in its entirety, but also contains features that render it especially utilitarian.

Through an exploration of these unique features in the index ...


Uncovering The Sources: Historical Characters In Dante's Divine Comedy, Vanessa Dimaggio Jan 2019

Uncovering The Sources: Historical Characters In Dante's Divine Comedy, Vanessa Dimaggio

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

A lack of citation of Dante’s specific source material for historical characters who appear in the Divine Comedy is widespread throughout the commentary tradition. I performed a close textual analysis of the Divine Comedy’s historical characters, comparing them with the chronicles, annals and histories of Dante’s time, using both archival research and secondary histories to do so, and interpreted those primary historical texts as potential sources consulted by Dante. The historical characters I focused on fell into three categories: 1) characters involved in the battles of Montaperti and Colle Val d’Elsa, 2) characters belonging to or ...


Music And The Act Of Song In Dante’S ‘Purgatorio’ And ‘Paradiso’, Kevin Brownlee Dec 2018

Music And The Act Of Song In Dante’S ‘Purgatorio’ And ‘Paradiso’, Kevin Brownlee

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

The present paper explores the relation between the vernacular words used to designate the Act of Song, and the inscribed texts of the Sung Music itself, by considering a set of key cases first in Purgatory and then in Paradise. It focuses on important moments of structural and literary transition, at the same time as showing how sung sacred texts relate to each other (and to other kinds of passages) in important functional ways. I examine how song works in five key moments of the protagonist’s journey: the exit from the final terrace of the Purgatorial mountain, and the ...


From Casella To Cacciaguida: A Musical Progression Toward Innocence, Thomas E. Peterson Dec 2018

From Casella To Cacciaguida: A Musical Progression Toward Innocence, Thomas E. Peterson

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

The essay draws an arc between the episodes of Casella and Cacciaguida under the sign of music. It explores the symmetry between the brief encounter with the minstrel who sings lines from Dante’s poetry, and the extended episode with Dante’s ancestor, who instructs him about his destiny. The symmetry is at once biographical, as the two scenes are among the most personal in the Commedia, theoretical, as they exemplify the relations between poetry and music expounded on in De vulgari eloquentia and Convivio, and theological, in a sense consistent with the writings of Augustine and Boethius. If Mars ...


Dante, Liszt, And The Alienated Agony Of Hell, Tekla Babyak Dec 2018

Dante, Liszt, And The Alienated Agony Of Hell, Tekla Babyak

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

Dante Alighieri’s Inferno portrays Hell as an alienated realm in which the doomed spirits must spend eternity in isolation and regret. The Hungarian composer Franz Liszt (1811–1886) responded to this work with his Dante Symphony (1857) based on the Inferno and Purgatorio, in which he gave musical form to Dante’s textual expressions of agony. Throughout this two-movement work, Liszt offers a musical translation of the theological and emotional world portrayed in Dante’s Divina Commedia. This article examines Liszt’s evocations of silence, memory, regret, and redemption in the Dante Symphony. These evocations are enhanced by Liszt ...


Nineteenth- And Twentieth-Century Musical Adaptations Of Dante’S ‘Commedia’: ‘Dante’S Greatest Hits’, Maria Ann Roglieri Dec 2018

Nineteenth- And Twentieth-Century Musical Adaptations Of Dante’S ‘Commedia’: ‘Dante’S Greatest Hits’, Maria Ann Roglieri

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

Composers through the centuries have tried to depict Dante’s Commedia in music, using Dante’s verses, characters, and design for Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, and their compositions. This paper looks at some of the trends in musical adaptations of the Commedia and also some of the “greatest hits”—in the author’s opinion. Works by James Norton, Patric Standford, Jacob ter Veldhuis, David Denniston, Franz Liszt, Donald Martino, Tod Machover, Anita Saij, Allik and Mulder, and Theodore Wiprud are discussed.


“Dentro A La Danza De Le Quattro Belle” (Purg. 31.104): Dance In Dante’S ‘Commedia’, Madison U. Sowell Dec 2018

“Dentro A La Danza De Le Quattro Belle” (Purg. 31.104): Dance In Dante’S ‘Commedia’, Madison U. Sowell

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

Missing from standard reference works on Dante’s Commedia are separate entries devoted exclusively to dance or dancing. Primary sources for the history of dance in the Italian Trecento derive from tablatures (musical notations), scattered iconographic images, and literary works, such as Boccaccio’s Decameron and Dante’s Commedia. Representations of dancing in these works invariably double as a symbolic language or meta-commentary on the surrounding narrative. The interpretation of dance’s role in late medieval art and literature depends not only on the context but also on the type of dance depicted. This article focuses on the allegorical roles ...


Conversations With Francesca: Tchaikovsky, Liszt, And Wagner (And Zandonai And Granados And Rachmaninov) Go To Hell, Jess Tyre Dec 2018

Conversations With Francesca: Tchaikovsky, Liszt, And Wagner (And Zandonai And Granados And Rachmaninov) Go To Hell, Jess Tyre

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

Tchaikovsky completed his tone poem Francesca da Rimini in 1876, during the period he was attending the premiere of Wagner’s Ring Cycle at Bayreuth. Critics of the work drew comparisons with the Tetralogy and faulted what seemed to be Tchaikovsky’s derivative inspiration. Indeed, the composer him-self acknowledged Wagner’s influence. In this paper, I set aside influence to consider intertextual dialogues between Tchaikovsky’s work and others by Liszt, Zandonai, Rachmaninov, and not Wagner’s Ring, but Tristan und Isolde. Drawing upon theories by Klein and Peirce, I examine parallelisms of topic, melodic contour, tonal motion, and timbral ...


Singing For Dante In ‘Purgatorio’ 30–31, Helena Phillips-Robins Dec 2018

Singing For Dante In ‘Purgatorio’ 30–31, Helena Phillips-Robins

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This essay investigates types of sociality enacted through song, as depicted in Dante’s Earthly Paradise. The first section of the essay argues that the singing of Psalm 30 (In te, Domine, speravi) in Purgatorio 30 is a way of enacting a particular mode of compassion. In the second section of the essay I argue that Dante’s depiction of Psalm 30—together with his depiction of the antiphon sung in Purgatorio 31, the Asperges me—invites a devotional response from the reader. The sociality of prayer can involve not only the characters, but also the readers of the Commedia ...


“Temprando Col Dolce L’Acerbo”: Instrumental And Vocal Polyphony In The ‘Commedia’, Francesco Ciabattoni Dec 2018

“Temprando Col Dolce L’Acerbo”: Instrumental And Vocal Polyphony In The ‘Commedia’, Francesco Ciabattoni

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This essay tracks the historical-musicological context of the lemma “organi” / “organo” as it appears in Purg. 9.144 and Par. 17.44. Drawing from medieval treatises and monks’ descriptions such as Raban Maur, Notkerus Balbulus, Baldric of Dol, Aelred of Rievaulx, and Wulstan, the author uses intertextual evidence to show that Purg. 9.144 (“quando a cantar con organi si stea”) evokes a great pipe organ as was found in some medieval churches. The essay also argues that Par. 17.43–44 (“come viene ad orecchia / dolce armonia da organo”) should be understood as a polyphonic organum that serves the ...


Stasis And Carnal Song: Dante’S Medusa And The Siren, Fiorentina Russo Dec 2018

Stasis And Carnal Song: Dante’S Medusa And The Siren, Fiorentina Russo

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

In his epic journey, Dante experiences entrapments, digressions, and ultimately new apertures, leading him forward on his journey to Paradise. The hag-siren of Purgatorio 19 is one of the primary figures, whose song sways the poet in a moment of reverie, embodying a de-mobilizing entrapment most unique and perilous within the poem. While the patristic and medieval traditions have traditionally portrayed the siren as a figure for the deleterious effects of music on the soul, Dante scholarship has glossed the dolce serena as a coordinate for the Medusa of Inferno 9. The siren's association with the Medusa implicitly harkens ...


Ironizing Ugolino, David Heinsen Dec 2018

Ironizing Ugolino, David Heinsen

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This article analyzes an adaptation of Canto 33 of the Inferno, a musical setting of Count Ugolino composed by Gaetano Donizetti (1828). The composition is first presented within the frame of its contemporaneous aesthetic, one that treats Ugolino as a pathos-inspired tale of human suffering. Donizetti’s composition, however, fails to align itself to this tragic reading due to structural contradictions that prevent the listener from sympathizing with the musical agent. To address this divergence, the article extends the most recent theories of musical narrative by Byron Almén and Michael Klein to propose an ironic reading of the work, essentially ...


Dante Decrypted: Musica Universalis In The Textual Architecture Of The ‘Commedia’, C.S. Adoyo Dec 2018

Dante Decrypted: Musica Universalis In The Textual Architecture Of The ‘Commedia’, C.S. Adoyo

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

For seven centuries scholars have speculated about the structural design of Dante’s Commedia but remain perplexed by the poem’s comprehensive ar-chitecture. This study undertakes a strictly empirical quantitative analysis of Dante’s magnum opus to address this lacuna. The outcome of this analysis enumerates the correspondence between the foundational rationale of the Commedia’s textual architecture and both physical and metaphysical concepts of Ptolemaic cosmology and Pythagorean principles of harmony and propor-tion as described by Boethius. The poem manifests a musically and mathemat-ically meticulous design conceptualized as musica universalis and expressed as musica instrumentalis that echoes Paschal and ...


“Scores For A Particular Chemical Orchestra”: The ‘Commedia’ And The Matter Of Sound In Osip Mandelstam’S ‘Conversation About Dante’, Andrea Gazzoni Dec 2018

“Scores For A Particular Chemical Orchestra”: The ‘Commedia’ And The Matter Of Sound In Osip Mandelstam’S ‘Conversation About Dante’, Andrea Gazzoni

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This paper discusses the implications of the wide-ranging use of sound in Osip Mandelstam’s 1933 essay “Conversation about Dante,” a landmark in the twentieth-century reception of Dante. With a special focus on the sound mo-tives incorporated in Mandelstam’s description of the Commedia, the Con-versation is analyzed as a study in the receptiveness of the reader, as it is acti-vated by the poetic speech of Dante in a call-and-response relation. At the same time, the paper explores issues of individuation, as reading through sound brings the reader back to his or her historicity and presentness, and of trans-formation, as ...


“Canzone... T’Ho Allevato Per Figliuola D’Amore”: Three Songs Of Love In Dante’S ‘Vita Nuova’, Alfred R. Crudale Dec 2018

“Canzone... T’Ho Allevato Per Figliuola D’Amore”: Three Songs Of Love In Dante’S ‘Vita Nuova’, Alfred R. Crudale

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This paper examines the poetics and musicality of three canzoni of Dante’s Vita Nuova and explores how four fundamental musical elements produce specific meanings while evoking a desired emotion in the reader. “Donne ch’avete intelletto d’amore,” the first canzone of the Vita Nuova, initiates Dante’s poetry of praise as it contributes to the elation of the first third of the work. The two later canzoni, “Donna pietosa” and “Li occhi dolenti,” however, transition the Vita Nuova to a more somber and finally grief-stricken piece. Analysis of the musical elements of these three poems demonstrates how Dante ...


A Portable Feast: The Production And Use Of The Thirteenth-Century Portable Bible 1200-1500, Alexander Leo Devine Jan 2016

A Portable Feast: The Production And Use Of The Thirteenth-Century Portable Bible 1200-1500, Alexander Leo Devine

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation celebrates the portable one-volume Latin Vulgate bibles produced on an unprecedented scale during the 13th century, particularly between 1230 and 1280, emphasizing their particular significance within the contexts of medieval book production and medieval bible use. The profound changes that these bibles implemented to the physical appearance and format of the Bible (as compact and portable copies of the complete biblical text), generated great innovations in the function and use of the Bible, and were directly responsible for the 13th-century portable bible’s extraordinary success and enduring popularity, in its own time and in ours, and thus their ...


The Transformations Of Judaism, David B. Ruderman Jul 2015

The Transformations Of Judaism, David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

This chapter addresses the primary transformations in Jewish civilization in the early modern era considering primarily the distinct histories of five large sub-communities—those of Italy, the western Sephardim (descendants of Jewish settlers from the Iberian peninsula who had primarily settled in Amsterdam, Hamburg, and Livorno beginning at the end of the sixteenth century), Germany and Central Europe, Poland-Lithuania, and the Ottoman Empire. It traces considers five markers in tracing the major political, social, and cultural transformations of early modern Jewry: mobility, migration, and social mixing; communal cohesion and laicization, a knowledge explosion, primarily the impact of print; the crisis ...


Early Modern Jewish History, David B. Ruderman Apr 2015

Early Modern Jewish History, David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

The term "early modernity" as the name of a period roughly extending from the end of the 15th to the end of the 18th century has only recently been employed by historians of Jewish culture and society. Despite a plethora of new studies in the last several decades, there have been few attempts to define the period as a whole as a distinct epoch in Jewish history, distinguishable from both the medieval and modern periods. Some historians have remained indifferent to demarcating the period, or have simply designated it as an extension of the Middle Ages, or have labeled it ...


Review Of Rella Kushelevsky, Penalty And Temptation: Hebrew Tales In Ashkenaz, Dan Ben-Amos Jan 2012

Review Of Rella Kushelevsky, Penalty And Temptation: Hebrew Tales In Ashkenaz, Dan Ben-Amos

Departmental Papers (NELC)

Most Fabula readers do not have an easy access to Hebrew books, and therefore it would be highly advisable to have the present volume available in a more accessible language to folklore scholars around the world. The issues that Rella Kushelevsky addresses, the texts that she interprets, and the analytical method that she employs are all relevant to current folklore scholarship, and therefore they can generate constructive debates, new research directions, and formulate new questions regarding medieval folklore.


The Problem Of Hylomorphism And Dualism In Avicenna: A Guide To Resolving Other Tensions, Andre M. Gregori May 2009

The Problem Of Hylomorphism And Dualism In Avicenna: A Guide To Resolving Other Tensions, Andre M. Gregori

CUREJ - College Undergraduate Research Electronic Journal

One of the greatest challenges posed to the student of Avicenna's psychology is whether he upholds a hylomorphic or dualistic conception of the soul. The hylomorphic position is the one espoused by Aristotle, in nuce that the soul is the entelecheia, or substantial form, of the body considered as matter. The dualistic position is that the soul is a separate substance that controls the body, itself also a substance. The goal of this essay is to determine the full complexity of Avicenna's position, by dissecting four of his great psychological works, each from a different point in his ...


‘A Scandal To The Whole Clergy’: Priests And Their Partners, Ruth Mazo Karras Nov 2008

‘A Scandal To The Whole Clergy’: Priests And Their Partners, Ruth Mazo Karras

Henry Charles Lea Lectures

Ruth Mazo Karras, Professor of History at the University of Minnesota, is the author of Sexuality in Medieval Europe: Doing Unto Others (2005) and From Boys to Men: Formations of Masculinity in Late Medieval Europe (2003).


Review Of Robert Bonfil, Jewish Life In Renaissance Italy, David B. Ruderman Jan 1996

Review Of Robert Bonfil, Jewish Life In Renaissance Italy, David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

This is a major work by one of the most creative and original historians of medieval and early modern Jewish history. Based on his extensive scholarship on Italian Jewry over the past twenty years, published primarily in Hebrew and Italian, it brings to the English reader a bold but mature synthesis of a significant epoch in Jewish and western history. Eschewing extensive annotation, the book, while hardly a popular survey, has a quality made more accessible to a wide readership by the elegantly simple and supple prose of the English translator Anthony Oldcorn, which captures Bonfil's original insights and ...


Medieval And Modern Jewish History, David B. Ruderman Jan 1995

Medieval And Modern Jewish History, David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

There has been a virtual explosion of scholarly writing on Jewish history in the medieval and modern periods during the last thirty years. One rough measure of this development is to compare the present entries on Jewish history in this Guide with the previous edition published in 1961. Of the hundred and twenty items on Jewish history listed in the earlier Guide, less than half actually pertain to the medieval and modern periods. This compares with some 325 items allotted to this section of the present Guide dealing exclusively with postancient Jewish history. But the sheer number of cited works ...


At The Intersection Of Cultures: The Historical Legacy Of Italian Jewry Prior To The Emancipation, David B. Ruderman Jan 1989

At The Intersection Of Cultures: The Historical Legacy Of Italian Jewry Prior To The Emancipation, David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

Among the precious artifacts included in the Jewish Museum's exhibition on Italian-Jewish life is a work of singular importance. It is a lexicon of rabbinic literature called the Arukh, written by Nathan ben Jehiel of Rome (1035-c.1110) at the beginning of the twelfth century (cat. no. 61). Why so modest a work, a mere dictionary of words and phrases, should elicit special attention requires some elucidation.


The Italian Renaissance And Jewish Thought, David B. Ruderman Jan 1988

The Italian Renaissance And Jewish Thought, David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

One notable example of the asymmetry between general European and Jewish historiography is their respective treatments of the Renaissance period. At least since the appearance of Jacob Burckhardt's classic study, The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy, historians have thoroughly discussed the significance of this cultural epoch, often with great intensity and acrimony. Despite their diverging and often contradictory perspectives, few would now argue with Burckhardt's initial assessment that the Renaissance marks a momentous transformation in European civilization in general and in Italian culture in particular. 1


Review Of Johann Reuchlin, On The Art Of The Kabbalah, David B. Ruderman Jan 1984

Review Of Johann Reuchlin, On The Art Of The Kabbalah, David B. Ruderman

Departmental Papers (History)

The idea of transplanting into English De arte cabalistica of Johannes Reuchlin is, no doubt, an exciting one. Reuchlin's work, originally published in 1517, was one of the first Latin books on the Jewish kabbalah written by a Christian. Since the writing of De verbo mirifico some twenty years earlier, Reuchlin had made considerable progress in mastering kabbalistic sources and utlized his expanded knowledge to produce an informed and sympathetic elucidation of his subject.


The Statutes Of The Teutonic Knights: A Study Of Religious Chivalry, Indrikis Sterns Jan 1969

The Statutes Of The Teutonic Knights: A Study Of Religious Chivalry, Indrikis Sterns

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

From the Preface:

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of the religious military orders, and of the Teutonic Knights in particular, within the process of change in developing the concept of a religious and a Christian warrior during the Crusades, or, in other words, how the existing Latin ideal of religious retreat was adapted, blended and attached to the chivalric image of Western Europe in the Holy Land, as reflected in the statutes of the Teutonic Knights. For this purpose the statutes of the other two prominent religious military orders, the Knights Templars and the Knights ...