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Islamic World and Near East History Commons

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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Islamic World and Near East History

Violence Against Women In Pakistan, Amina Bath Dec 2011

Violence Against Women In Pakistan, Amina Bath

Master's Theses

No abstract provided.


Beyond Anti-Semitism, Rebecca Gould Nov 2011

Beyond Anti-Semitism, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

Focusing on internal contradictions within the Israeli left, this essay considers the impact of the historical legacy of anti-Semitism on everyday thinking about Israel and the Palestinian territories. Contesting the view that to criticize Israel is to engage in anti-Semitic defamation, it offers an historical account of how Israel's actions in the West Bank have come to be immunized from conscientious criticism. It also documents how progressive media outlets in contemporary Israel have silenced or otherwise marginalized Israel's most active critics.


Secularism And Belief In Georgia’S Pankisi Gorge, Rebecca Gould Sep 2011

Secularism And Belief In Georgia’S Pankisi Gorge, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

No abstract provided.


Review Of Islam And Sufism In Daghestan, Moshe Gammer, Ed. And Daghestan And The World Of Islam, Ed. Moshe Gammer And David J. Wasserstein., Rebecca Gould Jan 2011

Review Of Islam And Sufism In Daghestan, Moshe Gammer, Ed. And Daghestan And The World Of Islam, Ed. Moshe Gammer And David J. Wasserstein., Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

No abstract provided.


The Modernity Of Premodern Islam In Contemporary Daghestan, Rebecca Gould Jan 2011

The Modernity Of Premodern Islam In Contemporary Daghestan, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

“The Modernity of Premodern Islam in Contemporary Daghestan,” Contemporary Islam: Dynamics of Muslim Life 5.2 (2011): 161-183.


Institutions, The Rise Of Commerce And The Persistence Of Laws: Interest Restrictions In Islam And Christianity, Jared Rubin Jan 2011

Institutions, The Rise Of Commerce And The Persistence Of Laws: Interest Restrictions In Islam And Christianity, Jared Rubin

Economics Faculty Articles and Research

Why was economic development retarded in the Middle East relative to Western Europe, despite the Middle East being far ahead for centuries? A theoretical model inspired and substantiated by the history of interest restrictions suggests that this outcome emanates in part from the greater degree to which early Islamic political authorities derived legitimacy from religious authorities. This entailed a feedback mechanism in Europe in which the rise of commerce led to the relaxation of interest restrictions while also diminishing the Church's ability to legitimise political authorities. These interactions did not occur in the Islamic world despite equally amenable economic ...


Defamation Of Religion: Rumors Of Its Death Are Greatly Exaggerated, Robert Blitt Dec 2010

Defamation Of Religion: Rumors Of Its Death Are Greatly Exaggerated, Robert Blitt

Robert C. Blitt

This Article explores the recent decisions by the United Nations (“UN”) Human Rights Council and General Assembly to adopt consensus resolutions aimed at “combating intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief.” These resolutions represent an effort to move past a decade’s worth of contentious roll call votes in favor of prohibiting defamation of religion within the international human rights framework. Although labeled “historic” resolutions, this Article argues that the UN’s new compromise approach endorsed in 2011 — motivated in part by the desire to end years ...


The Bottom Up Journey Of 'Defamation Of Religion' From Muslim States To The United Nations: A Case Study Of The Migration Of Anti-Constitutional Ideas, Robert Blitt Dec 2010

The Bottom Up Journey Of 'Defamation Of Religion' From Muslim States To The United Nations: A Case Study Of The Migration Of Anti-Constitutional Ideas, Robert Blitt

Robert C. Blitt

This chapter is intended to elaborate on the existing academic literature addressing the migration of constitutional ideas. Through an examination of ongoing efforts to enshrine “defamation of religion” as a violation of international human rights, the author confirms that the phenomenon of migration is not restricted to positive constitutional norms, but rather also encompasses negative ideas that ultimately may serve to undermine international and domestic constitutionalism. More specifically, the case study demonstrates that the movement of anti-constitutional ideas is not restricted to the domain of “international security” law, and further, that the vertical axis linking international and domestic law is ...