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Islamic World and Near East History Commons

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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Islamic World and Near East History

Sheikh Abdullah Quilliam’S International Influence: America, West Africa, And Beyond, Brent D. Singleton Jan 2017

Sheikh Abdullah Quilliam’S International Influence: America, West Africa, And Beyond, Brent D. Singleton

Library Faculty Publications

In the late 19th century, news concerning Abdullah Quilliam and the establishment of a community of British Muslim converts in Liverpool spread across the world, particularly among Muslims. As a well-placed Victorian convert to Islam in the heart of British Empire, Quilliam symbolized many things to Muslim communities worldwide, each group perceiving him in whatever light they needed to see him. For some Muslim converts in America he was a model, a mentor, and a mediator. For many Muslims in the British Empire, particularly West Africa, Quilliam provided a morale boost, a legitimatization for holding on to their religion ...


Index To The Crescent (Weekly Of The Liverpool Moslem Institute) For January 14, 1893-December 30, 1893; And January 2, 1895-March 6, 1895, Brent D. Singleton Jan 2014

Index To The Crescent (Weekly Of The Liverpool Moslem Institute) For January 14, 1893-December 30, 1893; And January 2, 1895-March 6, 1895, Brent D. Singleton

Library Faculty Publications

Presents a partial index of the Liverpool Moslem Institute's weekly newspaper The Crescent, covering the major people, places, events, and news from the paper. Indexes January 14, 1893-December 30, 1893; and January 2, 1895-March 6, 1895. Microfilm of The Crescent is available form the British Library.


‘That Ye May Know Each Other’: Late Victorian Interactions Between British And West African Muslims, Brent D. Singleton Oct 2009

‘That Ye May Know Each Other’: Late Victorian Interactions Between British And West African Muslims, Brent D. Singleton

Library Faculty Publications

From the early 1890’s to 1908 members of the Liverpool Moslem Institute led by Sheik William Henry Abdullah Quilliam had extensive contacts with their West African Muslim counterparts. This era was marked by several trends including the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire, European colonialism, extensive overseas Christian missionary activities as well as the vast expansion of Islam in West Africa. In this milieu, the British and West African Muslims built a mutually beneficial relationship with equality, respect, and brotherhood as its cornerstone. Their contacts developed and flourished quickly, leading to extensive correspondence, visits, and general support for one another ...


Brothers At Odds: Rival Islamic Movements In Late Nineteenth Century New York City, Brent D. Singleton Dec 2007

Brothers At Odds: Rival Islamic Movements In Late Nineteenth Century New York City, Brent D. Singleton

Library Faculty Publications

In late 1893, the nascent Indian-backed American Islamic Propaganda movement, led by Mohammed Alexander Russell Webb, fell into discord. Emin L. Nabakoff and John A. Lant left the movement and formed their own Muslim group, the First Society for the Study of Islam in America. For the next two years the leaders of the bitter rival organizations continued to conduct business. However, they also fought a very public war of words in the newspapers, leveling charges and countercharges against each other’s character, integrity, and Islamic legitimacy. The quarrel spread abroad to India and Britain where each side tried to ...


The Moslem World: A History Of America’S Earliest Islamic Newspaper And Its Successors, Brent D. Singleton Aug 2007

The Moslem World: A History Of America’S Earliest Islamic Newspaper And Its Successors, Brent D. Singleton

Library Faculty Publications

In the spring of 1893, The Moslem World debuted as America's first Islamic publication. The paper was to be the centerpiece in Mohammed Alexander Russell Webb's Indian backed American Islamic Propaganda mission to the United States. Despite near unanimous praise from critics with regard to the printing quality of the paper, there was a mixed reaction to the paper's contents and Webb's scheme in general. The paper was only published for seven issues before financial shortfalls from India doomed the ambitious publication. As well, internal strife within Webb's movement hampered efforts to regain the necessary ...


Minarets In Dixie: Two 1893 Proposals To Introduce Islam In The American South, Brent D. Singleton Dec 2006

Minarets In Dixie: Two 1893 Proposals To Introduce Islam In The American South, Brent D. Singleton

Library Faculty Publications

In May 1893, Mohammed Alexander Russell Webb, an American convert to Islam, communicated with landowners in Florida, Georgia, and Alabama to purchase property in order to establish colonies of Muslim Indian immigrants. A month earlier, Julius Chambers, a New York newspaper editor, put forth a call to convert the masses of African Americans in the South to Islam. This essay describes the two Islamization schemes, their interrelation, and their ultimate demise. Drawing mainly from Southern newspapers, the resultant press reaction both in support of and in opposition to Webb’s immigration plan is also presented. The essay is a starting ...


Rulers, Scholars, And Invaders: A Select Bibliography Of The Songhay Empire, Brent D. Singleton Jan 2004

Rulers, Scholars, And Invaders: A Select Bibliography Of The Songhay Empire, Brent D. Singleton

Library Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


African Bibliophiles: Books And Libraries In Medieval Timbuktu, Brent D. Singleton Jan 2004

African Bibliophiles: Books And Libraries In Medieval Timbuktu, Brent D. Singleton

Library Faculty Publications

The West African city of Timbuktu flourished as a center for Islamic scholarship from the 14th through the 16th century. The social structure of the city was based on wealth, with further stratification by degree of literacy, and expertise in interpreting Islamic legal texts. As a consequence, books and libraries evolved into blessed symbols of scholarship, wealth, and power. This study explores the history of books and libraries during the Golden Age of Timbuktu (1493--1591), followed by a discussion of the divergence of library practices in Timbuktu from those in the greater Islamic world of the time.


The Ummah Slowly Bled: A Select Bibliography Of Enslaved African Muslims In The Americas And The Caribbean, Brent D. Singleton Oct 2002

The Ummah Slowly Bled: A Select Bibliography Of Enslaved African Muslims In The Americas And The Caribbean, Brent D. Singleton

Library Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.