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History of Gender Commons

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Full-Text Articles in History of Gender

The Ideal And The Real: Southern Plantation Women Of The Civil War, Kelly H. Crosby Oct 2014

The Ideal And The Real: Southern Plantation Women Of The Civil War, Kelly H. Crosby

Student Publications

Southern plantation women experienced a shift in identity over the course of the Civil War. Through the diaries of Catherine Edmondston and Eliza Fain, historians note the discrepancy between the ideal and real roles women had while the men were off fighting. Unique perspectives and hidden voices in their writings offer valuable insight into the life of plantation women and the hybrid identity they gained despite the Confederate loss.


Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye Aug 2014

Emancipation For Slaves Or Emancipation For All: Women, Free Speech And The Abolition Movement, Wendy L. Giere-Frye

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

Women were active participants in the anti-slavery movement. They made up a large portion of professional abolitionists who traveled the country to educate the public on the perils of slavery. Unfortunately, their efforts were hindered by their gender, and it led to the restriction of their rights to speak publicly on the issue of slavery. This paper chronicles freedom of speech and the abolition movement and its impact on the women who fought for their rights to share in the emancipation fight. It’s a story about the efficacy of language and its impact on history and social change. The ...


A Changing Force: The American Civil War, Women, And Victorian Culture, Megan E. Mcnish Apr 2014

A Changing Force: The American Civil War, Women, And Victorian Culture, Megan E. Mcnish

Student Publications

The American Civil War thrust Victorian society into a maelstrom. The war disrupted a culture that was based on polite behavior and repression of desires. The emphasis on fulfilling duties sent hundreds of thousands of men into the ranks of Union and Confederate armies. Without the patriarchs of their families, women took up previously unexplored roles for the majority of their sex. In both the North and the South, females were compelled to do physical labor in the fields, runs shops, and manage slaves, all jobs which previously would have been occupied almost exclusively by men. These shifts in society ...