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Full-Text Articles in History of Gender

The Housewife, The Single Girl, And The Prostitute: Constructions Of Femininity In Postwar American Historiography, Marie Rowley Sep 2011

The Housewife, The Single Girl, And The Prostitute: Constructions Of Femininity In Postwar American Historiography, Marie Rowley

Psi Sigma Siren

America in the two decades after World War II experienced conditions that seemed to indicate an unprecedented focus on domesticity and traditional gender roles. Couples married at younger ages, fertility rates soared, and population shifted to suburban areas all over the country. Just beneath this surface, however, a more complex discourse about gender norms was also emerging. Gay and lesbian communities began to organize, teenagers emerged as a cultural force, and young single women began to view economic independence as a legitimate goal. These contradictory forces coexisted in a culture struggling to define gender and sexuality in the anxiety-ridden era ...


"This Murder Done": Misogyny, Femicide, And Modernity In 19th-Century Appalachian Murder Ballads, Christina Ruth Hastie Aug 2011

"This Murder Done": Misogyny, Femicide, And Modernity In 19th-Century Appalachian Murder Ballads, Christina Ruth Hastie

Masters Theses

This thesis contextualizes Appalachian murder ballads of the 19th- and early 20th-centuries through a close reading of the lyric texts. Using a research frame that draws from the musicological and feminist concepts of Diana Russell, Susan McClary, Norm Cohen, and Christopher Small, I reveal 19th-century Appalachia as a patriarchal, modern, and highly codified society despite its popularized image as a culturally isolated and “backward” place. I use the ballads to demonstrate how music serves the greater cultural purpose of preserving and perpetuating social ideologies. Specifically, the murder ballads reveal layers of meaning regarding hegemonic masculinities ...


Confounding Identity: Exploring The Life And Discourse Of Lucy E. Parsons, Michelle Diane Wright Jun 2011

Confounding Identity: Exploring The Life And Discourse Of Lucy E. Parsons, Michelle Diane Wright

Michelle Diane Wright

Despite the vast research conducted on radical activist history of late nineteenth century Chicago, there is very little that examines political and social ideologies that diverged from the westernized male archetype of the era. Furthermore, the contrived disciplinary divide that separates scholarly study into artificial and static compartments such as labor history, anarchist history, women’s studies or others, oversimplifies the contributions of individuals that straddle all categories of endeavor. Lucy Parsons, a woman of color, was born in Waco, Texas in 1853 but moved to Chicago in 1873 and became a pivotal figure in the labor and anarchist movements ...


A War Within World War Ii: Racialized Masculinity And Citizenship Of Japanese Americans And Korean Colonial Subjects, Jeffrey Yamashita May 2011

A War Within World War Ii: Racialized Masculinity And Citizenship Of Japanese Americans And Korean Colonial Subjects, Jeffrey Yamashita

History Honors Projects

Even though the Pacific Ocean stands as an aqueous wall between Japan and the United States, World War II exposed the shared relationship between these two nations in their utilization of racial minority populations for the war effort. I interrogate the intersections of gender identity, race, and citizenship of Japanese Americans and Korean colonial subjects in the Japanese Empire during World War II. Specifically, I compare Japanese Americans—soldiers of the segregated Japanese American100th/442nd Regimental Combat Team, draft resisters from Heart Mountain, and prisoners of war—with Korean colonial subjects—soldiers who fought for the Imperial Japanese ...


Naccs 38th Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies Mar 2011

Naccs 38th Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies

NACCS Conference Programs

Sites of Education for Social Justice
March 30-April 2, 2011
The Westin Pasadena


Interview Of Steven J. Stahley, Steven J. Stahley, Kate Ambrose Mar 2011

Interview Of Steven J. Stahley, Steven J. Stahley, Kate Ambrose

All Oral Histories

Steven J. Stahley was born in 1951 in Philadelphia Pennsylvania. He spent his childhood growing up in the Catholic school system, eventually moving to Cardinal Dougherty in 1965 to attend high school. It was in high school that Mr. Stahley decided he would enter the Missionary Servants of the Most Holy Trinity. During his first year with the Missionary Servants, a decision was made that all men would attend college and receive the “full college experience.” This brought Mr. Stahley to LaSalle University in 1970. After three years, Mr. Stahley graduated and worked his way through the process of becoming ...


“Not One Looks Like My Daughter!”: How American Girl Makes History Hegemony, Nicole Laconte Jan 2011

“Not One Looks Like My Daughter!”: How American Girl Makes History Hegemony, Nicole Laconte

History Honors Papers

American Girl markets dolls and books toward girls. Their original product line, which features historical characters, mobilizes history to teach moral lessons. This paper breaks down these morals to search for hegemony, a discourse that marginalizes minority readers. In this quest to uncover hegemony, the paper deals with issues of narrative perspective and socialization. Regarding narrative perspective, the paper asks, “Whom do these books deem normal in America? Whom do these books deem other in America?” Regarding socialization issues, this paper asks, “What value and behaviors do these books condone as part of acceptable American Girlhood? What values and behaviors ...