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Full-Text Articles in History of Gender

History Of Agriculture In The United States, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg Aug 2018

History Of Agriculture In The United States, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

History Publications

Agriculture is at the very center of the human enterprise; its trappings are in evidence all around, yet the agricultural past is an exceptionally distant place from modern America. While the majority of Americans once raised a significant portion of their own food, that ceased to be the case at the beginning of the 20th century. Only a very small portion of the American population today has a personal connection to agriculture. People still must eat, but the process by which food arrives on their plates is less evident than ever. The evolution of that process, with all of its ...


Women's Education, Amy Bix Jan 2008

Women's Education, Amy Bix

History Publications

Evolution of the American educational system has been shaped in multiple ways by concepts of appropriate gender roles and the value of different types of learning. In colonial America, while some schools offered boys and girls the same coursework, other teaching both reflected and reinforced gender divisions (Nash 2005). Some towns limited girls' training to basic reading and arithmetic, assuming that academics would prove less valuable to women than domestic skills such as sewing. Even as public high schools began to open over subsequent decades, they similarly focused the education of girls on cultivating them to become good wives and ...


Technology, Amy Bix Jan 2008

Technology, Amy Bix

History Publications

Gendered questions about technology depend on that word's definition. "Technology" often signifies machinery, images of race cars, robots, or military weapons that play to a macho love of power and speed. But once we broaden the concept of technology to include baby bottles, contraceptive devices, sewing patterns, and cell phones, gender connotations change. Furthermore, historians define technology not just as hardware but, equally important, as knowledge about making or doing things. This understanding opens discussion about technology to include skills such as cooking, weaving, and nursing (Lerman, Oldenziel, and Mohun 2003).


Biology And ‘Created Nature’: Gender And The Body In Popular Islamic Literature From Modern Turkey And The West, Taner Edis, Amy Bix Apr 2005

Biology And ‘Created Nature’: Gender And The Body In Popular Islamic Literature From Modern Turkey And The West, Taner Edis, Amy Bix

History Publications

A common theme in today's popular Islamic literature is defending traditional gender roles against forces of change. When addressing audiences who are strongly influenced by Western modernity, such as in Turkey and some immigrant populations in the industrialized West, this literature often justifies its pronouncements by invoking the apparent authority of science, especially biology. Authors paint a sharp dichotomy between men and women in body, mind, behavior, and character, asserting that such differences are inherent and immutable. In assuming masculine biological superiority, such writings sometimes end up offering a quasi-Aristotelian notion of the body, echoing theories of anatomy and ...


Bessie Coleman: Race And Gender Realities Behind Aviation Dreams, Amy Bix Jan 2005

Bessie Coleman: Race And Gender Realities Behind Aviation Dreams, Amy Bix

History Publications

OVER THE FIRST THREE DECADES FOLLOWING THE WRIGHT BROTHERS ’ TRIUMPH AT KITTY HAWK, AMERICANS ACROSS RACIAL AND GENDER LINES BECAME FASCINATED by the rich possibilities of flight. Especially after World War I (WWI), ordinary men and women were enraptured by what historian Joseph Corn has called “the gospel of aviation,” popular fascination with the marvelous, even magical, implications of flying. Many thrilled to the sense of leaving behind Earthbound limits, exploring suggestions that aviation had the power to cure disease, avert wars, and literally bring human beings closer to heaven.


Equipped For Life: Gendered Technical Training And Consumerism In Home Economics, 1920-1980, Amy Bix Oct 2002

Equipped For Life: Gendered Technical Training And Consumerism In Home Economics, 1920-1980, Amy Bix

History Publications

In tracing the development of technical education in American colleges and universities, historians have tended, perhaps inevitably, to concentrate on engineering departments. Those programs tell an important story: the evolution of specialized disciplines from practical, shop-oriented learning to theoretical science. Also, engineering schools were (as many still are) dominated by male students and faculty, who often connected technical expertise to masculinity.


Farm Boys, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg Jan 2001

Farm Boys, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

History Publications

Between the colonial period and 1925, the average American boy was a farm boy. During that period, the majority of Americans made their living from the soil and raised their children on farms. Being raised on a farm provided these boys with a far different experience than they would have had in the nation's growing cities. Although nineteenth-century, urban, middle- class children increasingly turned their attention to school and to play, farm boys remained integral to their families' economic survival well into the twentieth century. To be a farm boy was to be a worker, first and foremost. Beyond ...


Diseases Chasing Money And Power: Breast Cancer And Aids Activism Challenging Authority, Amy Bix Jan 1997

Diseases Chasing Money And Power: Breast Cancer And Aids Activism Challenging Authority, Amy Bix

History Publications

Through the 1980s and early 1990s, the course of American health research was increasingly shaped by politically,aggressive activism for two particular diseases, breast cancer and AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome). Even as national stakes rose, both in dollars spent and grow, ing demands on the medical system, breast cancer and AIDS advocates made government policy-making for research ever more public and con, croversial. Through skillful cultivation of political strength, interest groups transformed individual health problems into collective demands, winning notable policy influence in federal agencies such as the National lnsti, cutes of Health (NIH) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA ...