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Articles 1 - 27 of 27

Full-Text Articles in History of Gender

History Of Agriculture In The United States, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg Aug 2018

History Of Agriculture In The United States, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

History Publications

Agriculture is at the very center of the human enterprise; its trappings are in evidence all around, yet the agricultural past is an exceptionally distant place from modern America. While the majority of Americans once raised a significant portion of their own food, that ceased to be the case at the beginning of the 20th century. Only a very small portion of the American population today has a personal connection to agriculture. People still must eat, but the process by which food arrives on their plates is less evident than ever. The evolution of that process, with all of its ...


Sense Of Belonging In Computing: The Role Of Introductory Courses For Women And Underrepresented Minority Students, Linda J. Sax, Jennifer M. Blaney, Kathleen J. Lehman, Sarah L. Rodriguez, Kari L. George, Christina Zavala Jan 2018

Sense Of Belonging In Computing: The Role Of Introductory Courses For Women And Underrepresented Minority Students, Linda J. Sax, Jennifer M. Blaney, Kathleen J. Lehman, Sarah L. Rodriguez, Kari L. George, Christina Zavala

Education Publications

This study examines an aspect of gender and racial/ethnic gaps in undergraduate computing by focusing on sense of belonging among women and underrepresented minority (URM) introductory computing students. We examine change in sense of belonging during the introductory course as well as the predictors of belonging, with attention to conditional effects by gender and URM status. Results show that sense of belonging outcomes are a product of both incoming student characteristics and college environments and experiences, highlighting the important role the computing faculty play in fostering belonging. These and other findings are discussed, focusing on sense of belonging among ...


Institutionalizing An “Ethic Of Care” Into The Teaching Of Ethics For Pre-Service Teachers, Michelle Hawks, Thashika Pillay Apr 2017

Institutionalizing An “Ethic Of Care” Into The Teaching Of Ethics For Pre-Service Teachers, Michelle Hawks, Thashika Pillay

Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis

This paper calls for the acknowledgement and institutionalization of an ethic of care into the education of decision-making processes for pre-service teachers. The impetus for this paper came from the author's experiences with teaching a mandatory ethics and law course for pre-service teachers. Over the course of their teaching and as expounded upon in this paper, the authors illustrate how the course goals, aims, objectives and readings ignore discussions on gender in the teaching profession. Using a critical feminist policy analysis, the authors analyse the ethical perspectives taught in the required textbooks. Findings suggest that the absence of the ...


A New Examination Of The Arch Of Marcus Aurelius And Lucius Verus At Oea, Rachel Meyers Jan 2017

A New Examination Of The Arch Of Marcus Aurelius And Lucius Verus At Oea, Rachel Meyers

World Languages and Cultures Publications

The arch dedicated to Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus at Oea was an important component in that town’s building activity. By situating the arch within its socio-historical context and acknowledging the political identity of Oea and nearby towns, this article shows that the arch at Oea far surpassed nearby contemporary arches in style, material, and execution. Further, this article demonstrates that the arch was a key element in Oea’s Roman identity. Finally, the article bridges disciplinary boundaries by bringing together art historical analysis with the concepts of euergetism, Roman civic status, and inter-city rivalry in the Roman Empire.


Linking Rural Women Transnationally: Iowa’S “First Lady Of The Farm” And Post Wwii Ethos, Abby Dubisar Jan 2016

Linking Rural Women Transnationally: Iowa’S “First Lady Of The Farm” And Post Wwii Ethos, Abby Dubisar

English Publications

This essay expands understanding of situated and invented ethos by analyzing the archival writings of Ruth Buxton Sayre (1896-1980), known as “First Lady of the Farm.” Rhetorical analysis of post-WWII writings by Sayre, as well as archival photographs and publications about Sayre, position Sayre as a model for constructing negotiated ethos and accessing authority through multiple roles. Ultimately, this essay argues that Sayre had to redefine the accepted characterization of women on farms not only to propel her own pursuits as a rhetor, but also to convince farm women of their responsibilities for postwar reconstruction, positioning them as global citizens.


Book Review- Just Queer Folks: Gender And Sexuality In Rural America By Colin R. Johnson, Margaret B. Weber Jan 2015

Book Review- Just Queer Folks: Gender And Sexuality In Rural America By Colin R. Johnson, Margaret B. Weber

Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis

This is a book review of Colin Johnson's Just Queer Folks: Gender and Sexuality in Rural America.


The Door Of Hope: Farmwomen, Prostitution And Gender In Nineteenth Century Iowa, Hope Mitchell Jan 2015

The Door Of Hope: Farmwomen, Prostitution And Gender In Nineteenth Century Iowa, Hope Mitchell

Digital Scholarship and Initiatives Conference Presentations and Posters

Throughout the late nineteenth century, Midwestern reformers experienced a shift in the ways in which they viewed and approached prostitution. For citizens of Des Moines, the rural origins and ties of the city played a significant role in the way which Midwestern reformers began to approach prostitution in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Des Moines acted as not only a trading outpost and business hub for nearby farmers, but also as a center of potential employment for young farmwomen. Whether they heard about opportunities for work in Des Moines from friends or found them in newspapers, near the ...


Red Lights, White Chapel: The Working Girls Of Des Moines At The Turn Of The Century, Hope C. Mitchell Nov 2014

Red Lights, White Chapel: The Working Girls Of Des Moines At The Turn Of The Century, Hope C. Mitchell

Digital Scholarship and Initiatives Conference Presentations and Posters

Hope Mitchell, who is perhaps better known as Iowa's “Prostitution Historian,” will be the featured speaker. Mitchell earned the Iowa History Center’s Outstanding Master’s Thesis in Iowa History award this year for “Sacrificing our Daughters: Changing Perceptions of Prostitution in Iowa, 1880-1915.” She will share her research exploring the relationship between prostitution and farming culture, particularly among the women who worked in Des Moines’ red-light district, nicknamed “White Chapel” after the district in London’s east end where Jack the Ripper was known to haunt. Currently, Mitchell works as the Assistant Coordinator of the Digital Repository at ...


Sacrificing Our Daughters: Changing Perceptions Of Prostitution In Iowa, 1880-1915, Hope C. Mitchell Oct 2014

Sacrificing Our Daughters: Changing Perceptions Of Prostitution In Iowa, 1880-1915, Hope C. Mitchell

Digital Scholarship and Initiatives Conference Presentations and Posters

Ankeny native Hope Mitchell was this year’s recipient of the Iowa History Center’s annual award for the Outstanding Master’s Thesis in Iowa History. Mitchell received her MA in history from Iowa State University in the spring of 2014 and was recognized for her thesis, “Sacrificing our Daughters: Changing Perceptions of Prostitution in Iowa, 1880-1915.” Not only was she honored by the Center with a plaque and $1,000 prize, she was also featured in a front-page article in the Des Moines Register. Mitchell’s study focused on prostitution in Des Moines and examined the city’s changing ...


Sisterhood In The '60s: Joan, Peggy, And A Feminist Awakening, Tracy Lucht Jan 2014

Sisterhood In The '60s: Joan, Peggy, And A Feminist Awakening, Tracy Lucht

Journalism Publications

The period between World War II and the women's liberation movement was marked by palpable tension over social changes and gender ideology-an aspect of the postwar era well-known to historians but usually overlooked in the mass media. Television shows such as Leave It to Beaver (1957-1963), Father Knows Best (1954-1960), and The Adventures ofOzzie and Harriet (1952-1966) imagined a time that never existed, presenting the nation's women as domestic and suburban, happily embracing their roles as homemakers and submitting to their husband's authority (Coontz, 2000). This idyllic media memory, bequeathed to subsequent generations by reruns of these ...


Race, Religion, And Rights: Otherness Gone Mad, Tracy Lucht Jan 2014

Race, Religion, And Rights: Otherness Gone Mad, Tracy Lucht

Journalism Publications

Inevitable yet often unnamed, the looming political radicalism of the late 1960s acts as something like a silent partner in the Mad Men narrative, relying on viewers' historical knowledge of the social tension outside Sterling Cooper to underscore the contrived nature of the world within it. Just as the series spans the period between the emergence of liberal and radical white feminist discourses, it also bridges key moments in the civil rights movement, from the boycotts, voter registration drives, and sweeping oratory of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., to the assassinations of civil rights leaders and activists; rioting in ...


Reconsidering Opportunities For Female Benefactors In The Roman Empire: Julia Antonia Eurydice And The Gerontikon At Nysa, Rachel Meyers Jan 2012

Reconsidering Opportunities For Female Benefactors In The Roman Empire: Julia Antonia Eurydice And The Gerontikon At Nysa, Rachel Meyers

World Languages and Cultures Publications

A small, yet significant body of archaeological and epigraphical evidence demonstrates that women in the Roman Empire undertook a variety of public roles. Recent research has centered on wealthy, elite females, who made benefactions in Rome and around the empire in the form of building projects, alimenta, and entertainment. These endeavors required a great deal of money and placed the benefactress in the eye of the public. One of the better known examples of such a woman is Plancia Magna from Perge, who in the early second century held the positions of demiourgos, gymnasiarch, and priestess of Artemis and renovated ...


Motherhood And Activism In The Dis/Enabling Context Of War: The Case Of Cindy Sheehan, Abby Dubisar Jan 2011

Motherhood And Activism In The Dis/Enabling Context Of War: The Case Of Cindy Sheehan, Abby Dubisar

English Publications

U.S. peace activist and mother Cindy Sheehan built her authority as a peace activist by yoking her antiwar mission to her role as a mother of a dead soldier son. In a statement addressed to Donald Rumsfeld, secretary of defense during the war on Iraq, Sheehan (2005, 45) wrote: "I wish I could convey to you in person the pain and devastation your reckless policies have brought to my life. The grief is so profound and primal that it can't be described by the written word. You can't see my red, swollen eyes or my grief-etched face ...


Women's Education, Amy Bix Jan 2008

Women's Education, Amy Bix

History Publications

Evolution of the American educational system has been shaped in multiple ways by concepts of appropriate gender roles and the value of different types of learning. In colonial America, while some schools offered boys and girls the same coursework, other teaching both reflected and reinforced gender divisions (Nash 2005). Some towns limited girls' training to basic reading and arithmetic, assuming that academics would prove less valuable to women than domestic skills such as sewing. Even as public high schools began to open over subsequent decades, they similarly focused the education of girls on cultivating them to become good wives and ...


What Happens To Countess Geschwitz? Revisiting Homosexuality In Horkheimer And Adorno, Kevin S. Amidon Jan 2008

What Happens To Countess Geschwitz? Revisiting Homosexuality In Horkheimer And Adorno, Kevin S. Amidon

World Languages and Cultures Publications

In the philosophical and culture-critical works of Theodor Adorno and Max Hork- heimer, the concept of homosexuality exists almost always in close textual relation to fascist domination. This is because they cannot see homosexual persons as exist- ing outside the dominating discourses of the nineteenth-century bourgeois legal and psychiatric explication of homosexuality. This issue throws the stakes of ethical reflection in Critical Theory into high relief, especially since feminist thinkers including Judith Butler have recently provided a highly positive rereading of Adorno’s ethics. A close reading of Adorno’s exploration of Alban Berg’s opera Lulu further demonstrates the ...


Technology, Amy Bix Jan 2008

Technology, Amy Bix

History Publications

Gendered questions about technology depend on that word's definition. "Technology" often signifies machinery, images of race cars, robots, or military weapons that play to a macho love of power and speed. But once we broaden the concept of technology to include baby bottles, contraceptive devices, sewing patterns, and cell phones, gender connotations change. Furthermore, historians define technology not just as hardware but, equally important, as knowledge about making or doing things. This understanding opens discussion about technology to include skills such as cooking, weaving, and nursing (Lerman, Oldenziel, and Mohun 2003).


Review Of Eve D'Ambra's, Roman Women, Rachel Meyers Jan 2007

Review Of Eve D'Ambra's, Roman Women, Rachel Meyers

World Languages and Cultures Publications

A compact and practical introductory volume to Roman women is a welcome addition to the study of women in Classical antiquity. Part of a new Cambridge Introduction to Roman Civilization series, Eve D'Ambra's Roman Women aims to introduce the daily lives of Roman women to students with no previous knowledge of the topic. D'Ambra demonstrates how a range of sources, written and material, are valuable not just for reconstructing how women lived but also for examining the positions of and attitudes towards women in Roman society.


Biology And ‘Created Nature’: Gender And The Body In Popular Islamic Literature From Modern Turkey And The West, Taner Edis, Amy Bix Apr 2005

Biology And ‘Created Nature’: Gender And The Body In Popular Islamic Literature From Modern Turkey And The West, Taner Edis, Amy Bix

History Publications

A common theme in today's popular Islamic literature is defending traditional gender roles against forces of change. When addressing audiences who are strongly influenced by Western modernity, such as in Turkey and some immigrant populations in the industrialized West, this literature often justifies its pronouncements by invoking the apparent authority of science, especially biology. Authors paint a sharp dichotomy between men and women in body, mind, behavior, and character, asserting that such differences are inherent and immutable. In assuming masculine biological superiority, such writings sometimes end up offering a quasi-Aristotelian notion of the body, echoing theories of anatomy and ...


Bessie Coleman: Race And Gender Realities Behind Aviation Dreams, Amy Bix Jan 2005

Bessie Coleman: Race And Gender Realities Behind Aviation Dreams, Amy Bix

History Publications

OVER THE FIRST THREE DECADES FOLLOWING THE WRIGHT BROTHERS ’ TRIUMPH AT KITTY HAWK, AMERICANS ACROSS RACIAL AND GENDER LINES BECAME FASCINATED by the rich possibilities of flight. Especially after World War I (WWI), ordinary men and women were enraptured by what historian Joseph Corn has called “the gospel of aviation,” popular fascination with the marvelous, even magical, implications of flying. Many thrilled to the sense of leaving behind Earthbound limits, exploring suggestions that aviation had the power to cure disease, avert wars, and literally bring human beings closer to heaven.


Equipped For Life: Gendered Technical Training And Consumerism In Home Economics, 1920-1980, Amy Bix Oct 2002

Equipped For Life: Gendered Technical Training And Consumerism In Home Economics, 1920-1980, Amy Bix

History Publications

In tracing the development of technical education in American colleges and universities, historians have tended, perhaps inevitably, to concentrate on engineering departments. Those programs tell an important story: the evolution of specialized disciplines from practical, shop-oriented learning to theoretical science. Also, engineering schools were (as many still are) dominated by male students and faculty, who often connected technical expertise to masculinity.


Farm Boys, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg Jan 2001

Farm Boys, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

History Publications

Between the colonial period and 1925, the average American boy was a farm boy. During that period, the majority of Americans made their living from the soil and raised their children on farms. Being raised on a farm provided these boys with a far different experience than they would have had in the nation's growing cities. Although nineteenth-century, urban, middle- class children increasingly turned their attention to school and to play, farm boys remained integral to their families' economic survival well into the twentieth century. To be a farm boy was to be a worker, first and foremost. Beyond ...


Readers' Theatre As A History Teaching Tool, Sandra D. Harmon, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg, Susan Westbury Aug 1999

Readers' Theatre As A History Teaching Tool, Sandra D. Harmon, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg, Susan Westbury

Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

LAST YEAR marked the one-hundred-and-fiftietha nniversaryo f the first women's rights convention held at Seneca Falls, New York. We wanted to celebrate the event with a dramatic presentation for our students. Lacking the skill to write a compelling play, we decided to put on a readers' theatre version of the convention. Such productions are engaging and relatively easy to stage as the actors read from scripts, usually without costumes or scenery. Readers' theatre also allows greater control over historical accuracy than a conventional play. Since history is only occasionally dramatic, the demands of theatre, whether on stage or in ...


Diseases Chasing Money And Power: Breast Cancer And Aids Activism Challenging Authority, Amy Bix Jan 1997

Diseases Chasing Money And Power: Breast Cancer And Aids Activism Challenging Authority, Amy Bix

History Publications

Through the 1980s and early 1990s, the course of American health research was increasingly shaped by politically,aggressive activism for two particular diseases, breast cancer and AIDS (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome). Even as national stakes rose, both in dollars spent and grow, ing demands on the medical system, breast cancer and AIDS advocates made government policy-making for research ever more public and con, croversial. Through skillful cultivation of political strength, interest groups transformed individual health problems into collective demands, winning notable policy influence in federal agencies such as the National lnsti, cutes of Health (NIH) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA ...


Jane Howell And Subverting Shakespeare: Where Do We Draw The Lines?, Linda Shenk Jan 1995

Jane Howell And Subverting Shakespeare: Where Do We Draw The Lines?, Linda Shenk

Linda Shenk

When Ralph Berry asks RSC director Bill Alexander to explain how a director chooses to do a Shakespearean play in a certain manner, Alexander replies: "For me, it all boils down to this: how best can I reveal this play, how best can I release my own perception of the play, my own feeling of what it's about, and what it says and why he wrote it" (Berry 178). To fulfill these goals, directors often choose to set a play in a different historical context, devise a thematic doubling scheme, and/or cut lines to emphasize a specific concept ...


Athletic Directors, Faculty Athletic Representatives, And Women's Basketball Coaches Perceptions Of Title Ix Compliance At Ncaa Division Iii Institutions , Kevin L. Sanger Jan 1995

Athletic Directors, Faculty Athletic Representatives, And Women's Basketball Coaches Perceptions Of Title Ix Compliance At Ncaa Division Iii Institutions , Kevin L. Sanger

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Intercollegiate athletic programs are provided for student athletes to supplement their education. These extracurricular opportunities are thought to be very important in developing a well-rounded individual. Athletics expose student athletes to competition, team work, goal setting, and other experiences that contribute to being successful in later life (NCAA, 1992). Logically, it seems apparent that these opportunities should be provided equally to men and women participating in intercollegiate athletics since the resulting benefits of athletic participation should be gender neutral. Despite the obvious need for equality, a great disparity still exists in intercollegiate athletics in regard to opportunities provided for men ...


College Women Athletes' Knowledge And Perceptions Of Title Ix , Michael Paul Jacob Jan 1993

College Women Athletes' Knowledge And Perceptions Of Title Ix , Michael Paul Jacob

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

If athletes are to be the instrument for obtaining greater equality in sports, especially by legal recourse, then obviously they must be knowledgeable about Title IX. Historically, confusion has existed regarding the various facets of Title IX. Today, such a lack of understanding of Title IX may limit the possibility of pressing for legal action that would result in greater equity in sport. It seems imperative, therefore, that the people most effected by Title IX should be the most knowledgeable about it. The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine athlete's [sic] knowledge about Title IX; (2) assess ...


A Content Analysis Of Three Women's Magazines From 1960 To 1970 , Rosemary Benedetta Corsiglia Jan 1971

A Content Analysis Of Three Women's Magazines From 1960 To 1970 , Rosemary Benedetta Corsiglia

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

On March 18, 1970, a group of women from various women's Liberation groups held a sit-in at the New York offices of Ladies Home Journal. This sit-in focused on a controversy over the quality of women's magazines using Ladies Home Journal as a prototype. They said, "Ladies Home Journal creates frustrations which lead to depression and anger because women cannot live up to what the magazine tells them they should. The attitudes of the Journal are aborrent and degrading to women." (19) [...] Out of all this, one is still left with the question, what exactly are women's ...