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Full-Text Articles in History of Gender

Insurrectionary Heroines: The Possibilities And Limits Of Women’S Radical Action During The French Revolution, Sean M. Wright May 2013

Insurrectionary Heroines: The Possibilities And Limits Of Women’S Radical Action During The French Revolution, Sean M. Wright

Grand Valley Journal of History

The article titled, Insurrectionary Heroines: The Possibilities and Limits of Women’s Radical Action During the French Revolution, gathers research materials from multiple primary and secondary sources to generate an analysis of women’s participation in the French Revolution. The focus of this analysis draws on how these women confronted the Early Modern European female status quo through the use of radical action during the Revolution, which ultimately led to the creation of new possibilities for women's participation in society and revealed the limitations of this new found participation. Radical action is defined by four major events in the ...


Feeble To Effeminacy: Race And Gender In The British Imperial Consciousness 1837-1901, Brett Linsley Mar 2013

Feeble To Effeminacy: Race And Gender In The British Imperial Consciousness 1837-1901, Brett Linsley

Grand Valley Journal of History

Scholars of British imperialism have given ample attention to European concepts of race and gender during the Victorian era. Much of the literature has vaguely suggested a symbiotic relationship between the concepts, but failed to assert any definitive theories. The following attempts to fill this gap by putting forward a critical interpretation of the roles that race and gender played in the imperial consciousness during this epoch. The paper demonstrates that the perceptions of race that were rampant on the imperial periphery were the unique synthesis of evolving gender identities in the Victorian metropole.


Bess Of Hardwick: Second Most Powerful Woman Of The Elizabethan Age And A Symbol Of Modern Thought, Hollie Mcdonald Dec 2012

Bess Of Hardwick: Second Most Powerful Woman Of The Elizabethan Age And A Symbol Of Modern Thought, Hollie Mcdonald

Grand Valley Journal of History

While not a very elegant representation of Bess of Hardwick, this quatrain nevertheless introduces a striking and unique character of an Elizabethan woman. Many studies on Elizabethan women focus on the subjugated place of females in that society. However, women, such as Bess of Hardwick, existed, and did not fit within these stereotypes, much like the poem by one of Bess’ contemporaries indicates. Often, since these women are minorities in sixteenth century England, they are overlooked entirely and not given proper credit for their accomplishments and services to crown and country. This is an ungracious disservice to the women who ...


Why Chinese Neo-Confucian Women Made A Fetish Of Small Feet, Aubrey L. Mcmahan Dec 2012

Why Chinese Neo-Confucian Women Made A Fetish Of Small Feet, Aubrey L. Mcmahan

Grand Valley Journal of History

Abstract for “Why Chinese Neo-Confucian Women Made a Fetish of Small Feet

This paper explores the source of the traditional practice of Chinese footbinding which first gained popularity at the end of the Tang dynasty and continued to flourish until the last half of the twentieth century.[1] Derived initially from court concubines whose feet were formed to represent an attractive “deer lady” from an Indian tale, footbinding became a wide-spread symbol among the Chinese of obedience, pecuniary reputability, and Confucianism, among other things.[2],[3] Drawing on the analyses of such scholars as Beverly Jackson, Valerie Steele and John ...


“No Man’S Land”: Fairy Tales, Gender, Socialization, Satire, And Trauma During The First And Second World Wars, Dawn Heerspink Feb 2012

“No Man’S Land”: Fairy Tales, Gender, Socialization, Satire, And Trauma During The First And Second World Wars, Dawn Heerspink

Grand Valley Journal of History

No abstract provided.