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Full-Text Articles in History of Gender

La Representación De La Masculinidad Y La Violencia De Género En La Novela Española De La Posguerra, Alfredo M. Pastor Nov 2014

La Representación De La Masculinidad Y La Violencia De Género En La Novela Española De La Posguerra, Alfredo M. Pastor

FIU Electronic Theses and Dissertations

While it may be argued that aggression against women is part of a culture of violence deeply rooted in Spanish society, the gender-related violence that exists in today’s Spain is more specifically a legacy of Franco’s dictatorship (1939-1975). Franco’s Spain endorsed unequal gender relations, championed patriarchal dominance and power over women, and imposed models of hegemonic and authoritarian masculinities that internalized violence by rendering it a feature inseparable from manhood and virility.

This dissertation provides a comprehensive analysis of masculinity and gender violence in Franco’s Spain, by analyzing the novel as the primary cultural vehicle of ...


Review Of Notable Men And Women Of Our Time, Brian Maxson Oct 2014

Review Of Notable Men And Women Of Our Time, Brian Maxson

Brian J. Maxson

Paolo Giovio wrote his text in the aftermath of the sack of Rome by imperial troops in 1527, although the work remained unfinished at the time of the author's death some twenty-five years.


'Fors Clavigera', The Young Women Of Whitelands College, And The Temptations Of Social History, Christopher Bischof Sep 2014

'Fors Clavigera', The Young Women Of Whitelands College, And The Temptations Of Social History, Christopher Bischof

History Faculty Publications

On the first of May each year from the 1880s onward the young women at Whitelands teacher training college in London celebrated by throwing to the wind the timetable that normally dictated how their every moment would be spent. Instead, they adorned the college in flowers, donned in white dresses, and spent the day dancing, singing, and reading poetry. The tradition of May Day helped to poke a hole in the rather dour institutional regimen of Whitelands, which opened the way for many smaller, everyday acts that gradually reworked the ethos of the college.


Jewel Of Womanhood: A Feminist Reinterpretation Of Queen Katherine Howard, Holly K. Kizewski Jul 2014

Jewel Of Womanhood: A Feminist Reinterpretation Of Queen Katherine Howard, Holly K. Kizewski

Dissertations, Theses, & Student Research, Department of History

In 1540, King Henry VIII married his fifth wife, Katherine Howard. Less than two years later, the young queen was executed on charges of adultery. Katherine Howard has been much maligned by history, often depicted as foolish, vain, and outrageously promiscuous. Her few defenders often attempt to exonerate Katherine by claiming that she was chaste, innocent of the adultery charges brought against her, or a victim of rape. Both detractors and defenders usually reduce Katherine to her sexuality.

However, the surviving primary sources about Katherine reveal a more complex individual. In fact, examination of conduct books for young women of ...


Female Body Modification Through Physical Manipulation: A Comparison Of Foot-Binding And Corsetry, Hannah Conroy Apr 2014

Female Body Modification Through Physical Manipulation: A Comparison Of Foot-Binding And Corsetry, Hannah Conroy

History Undergraduate Theses

Over the past fifty years, with the continuing contributions of many Gender History scholars, historians are now presented with an opportunity to explore an often overlooked area within the physical manipulation of women’s bodies. There are a variety of means by which the female form is shaped by the cultural and societal norms, including the pressures to look young and beautiful. However, few connections have been made between two well-known and well-researched areas: foot-binding and corsetry. The first was practiced by women for one-thousand years in China, ending in the early years of the Communist revolution. The second were ...


Victorian Domesticity And The Perpetuation Of Childhood: An Examination Of Gender Roles And The Family Unit In J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, Abigail Nusbaum Apr 2014

Victorian Domesticity And The Perpetuation Of Childhood: An Examination Of Gender Roles And The Family Unit In J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, Abigail Nusbaum

Masters Theses

This work examines JM Barrie's Peter Pan in light of its cultural context. It works to show how the Victorian ideology of the separate spheres narrowed the scope of roles for men and women within the home, which ultimately led to an obsession with childhood that manifested itself strongly in the works of the children of the Victorians, the Edwardians. A study of the Victorian society in which Barrie grew up and first imagined Peter Pan, accompanied by a close reading of the text, reveals Barrie using the various characters' interactions with the title character as cultural artifacts that ...


The Student Researcher Volume 1 (Full Publication), Selena Sanderfer Faculty Advisor Jan 2014

The Student Researcher Volume 1 (Full Publication), Selena Sanderfer Faculty Advisor

The Student Researcher: A Phi Alpha Theta Publication

No abstract provided.


Leading Ladies: A Study Of Queenship And Identity Through Conquest, Rose Thormahlen Jan 2014

Leading Ladies: A Study Of Queenship And Identity Through Conquest, Rose Thormahlen

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

The study of medieval women is often viewed with a qualitative purpose. Scholars seek to define the medieval woman as either empowered or oppressed, and within the medieval timeframe, as either more or less so than their predecessors. The year 1066 is seen as a turning point by many for the female narrative; it was the year of the Norman Conquest, which brought with it new schools of thought and manners of life. Rather than attempting to qualify the lives of women as either good or back, the question of medieval women can be approached by asking how they were ...


"Feminist Lawyers And Political Change In Modern France, 1900-1940." In Eva Schandevyl Ed., Women In Law And Law-Making In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Century Europe, Chapter 2. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2014: 45-73., Sara L. Kimble Jan 2014

"Feminist Lawyers And Political Change In Modern France, 1900-1940." In Eva Schandevyl Ed., Women In Law And Law-Making In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Century Europe, Chapter 2. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2014: 45-73., Sara L. Kimble

School of Continuing and Professional Studies Faculty Publications

This research considers how French female lawyers participated in legal reform during the period from 1900 to 1940. Frenchwomen were admitted to the legal profession in 1900 by an act of parliament and this reform brought political implications in its wake. My research on the first cadres of female lawyers illustrates that that they were unusually political active. As unequal members of the profession and unequal citizens in the society many of these new professionals engaged in a vigorous defense of equality and justice.


Quantitative Literacy And The Humanities, Rachel Chrastil Jan 2014

Quantitative Literacy And The Humanities, Rachel Chrastil

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Finding The Witch’S Mark: Female Participation In The Judicial System During The Hopkins Trials 1645-47, Shannon M. Lundquist Jan 2014

Finding The Witch’S Mark: Female Participation In The Judicial System During The Hopkins Trials 1645-47, Shannon M. Lundquist

Departmental Honors Projects

Between the years of 1645 and 1647 in East Anglia, a series of witch trials known as the Hopkins Trials took place. In all, 250 witches were accused and 100 hanged. The ability to convict a person of the crime of witchcraft relied heavily on evidence which was hard to come by given the nature of the crime of witchcraft. Tangible proof of an intangible crime was needed; this came in the form of witch’s marks. To the learned population, marks were a symbol of the witch’s covenant with the devil. To the lay person, they were called ...


A Position Embedded In Identity: Subalternity In Neoliberal Globalization, Sonita Sarker Dec 2013

A Position Embedded In Identity: Subalternity In Neoliberal Globalization, Sonita Sarker

Sonita Sarker

No abstract provided.


Feminist Lawyers And Political Change In Modern France, 1900-1940, Sara L. Kimble Dec 2013

Feminist Lawyers And Political Change In Modern France, 1900-1940, Sara L. Kimble

Sara L Kimble

No abstract provided.


"Feminist Lawyers And Political Change In Modern France, 1900-1940." In Eva Schandevyl Ed., Women In Law And Law-Making In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Century Europe, Chapter 2. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2014: 45-73., Sara L. Kimble Dec 2013

"Feminist Lawyers And Political Change In Modern France, 1900-1940." In Eva Schandevyl Ed., Women In Law And Law-Making In The Nineteenth And Twentieth Century Europe, Chapter 2. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2014: 45-73., Sara L. Kimble

Sara L Kimble

This research considers how French female lawyers participated in legal reform during the period from 1900 to 1940. Frenchwomen were admitted to the legal profession in 1900 by an act of parliament and this reform brought political implications in its wake. My research on the first cadres of female lawyers illustrates that that they were unusually political active. As unequal members of the profession and unequal citizens in the society many of these new professionals engaged in a vigorous defense of equality and justice.