Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History of Gender Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in History of Gender

Buried Before, Devan Herbert Jan 2019

Buried Before, Devan Herbert

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Buried Before is a twelve-minute concert dance work which was performed February 7-10, 2019, in the Charlotte York Irey Theatre by Sasha Alcott, Sara Varra, Olivia Hodnett, and Adia Banks. This essay is a roadmap to understanding the piece as well as the research process that accompanied it. The piece challenges the way war stories are told, particularly the themes of glorification, masculinity, and heroism. It centralizes the body in the telling of women’s war stories which provides a level of complexity and abstraction which are not present in linear, traditional war narratives. Throughout both the essay and the ...


Linguistic Feminism & The Body In 20th-Century French Feminist Texts, Lauren Hammett Apr 2018

Linguistic Feminism & The Body In 20th-Century French Feminist Texts, Lauren Hammett

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines the use of linguistic feminism and references to the body in 20th-century French feminist texts, and particularly in the work of Luce Irigaray. This involves an investigation into the nature of French feminism and the validity of the accusations of essentialism that have been leveled against it by many critics. The thesis argues for French feminists' place in feminist scholarship and for an anti-essentialist, more figurative reading of their discussions of the body, in addition to examining their discussions of language, including écriture féminine. Finally, the implications of French feminist ideology for feminism today, as well as ...


Defining Ambiguous: Lesbianism And The Vampire In “Christabel” And Carmilla, Holly E. Reynolds May 2017

Defining Ambiguous: Lesbianism And The Vampire In “Christabel” And Carmilla, Holly E. Reynolds

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Within vampire fiction, there exists a common narrative of a wide-eyed, innocent victim being pursued and then corrupted by a mysterious figure. At first glance, Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "Christabel" (1816) and Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's novella Carmilla (1872) seem to adhere to this narrative. Both works feature young women, Christabel in "Christabel" and Laura in Carmilla, being pursued by vampires: specifically, female vampires. However, it can be argued that the young women in Coleridge's and Le Fanu's works are not victims; rather, they are liberated agents acting independently in their sexual lives. An analysis of ...


Group Discipleship And Individual Spirituality: Challenging Models Of False Sanctity In Early Modern Italy And Spain, Mary Andino Apr 2016

Group Discipleship And Individual Spirituality: Challenging Models Of False Sanctity In Early Modern Italy And Spain, Mary Andino

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This honors thesis examines men and women tried by the Inquisition in Italy and Spain for the crime of false sanctity, or feigning holiness. This paper relies on these trials to explore discipleship, confession, personal spirituality, and visionary experience in early modern Europe.


Bouts Of Brain Fever: Female Rebellion And The Dubiety Of Illness In Victorian Fiction, Stephanie R. Mason May 2015

Bouts Of Brain Fever: Female Rebellion And The Dubiety Of Illness In Victorian Fiction, Stephanie R. Mason

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In several Victorian novels, a character becomes incapacitated—and bedridden—for a period of time due to an elusive ailment known as brain fever; these mental alterations usually occur in female characters after an unexpected event or a stress-ridden situation. However, the sources of and meanings behind these fits of brain fever are limited to generic descriptions (if the author provides any explanation at all). This apparently intentional absence of information suggests that the illnesses act as symbols, alluding to or attempting to understand relevant social issues of the time. Through an in-depth study of Elizabeth Gaskell’s Mary Barton ...


From The Holy Land To The Cloister: The Decline Of Female Ascetic Pilgrimages In The Early Medieval West (C. 350-615), Manon Williams Jan 2015

From The Holy Land To The Cloister: The Decline Of Female Ascetic Pilgrimages In The Early Medieval West (C. 350-615), Manon Williams

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper will focus on the mobility of ascetic women from late antiquity through to the early Middle Ages with a particular emphasis on the practice of pilgrimage. As seen in multiple primary source documents, religious women from the West were journeying to the Holy Land and beyond from the fourth through to the early fifth centuries. This practice, however, is mentioned remarkably less in accounts of religious women north of the Alps in the late fifth century onwards. Evidence of women undertaking pilgrimages to the Holy Land is sparse while their male counterparts continued to make such journeys. Although ...