Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

European History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

World War II

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in European History

A Different Way Of Touring Europe; One Aid Man's Journey Across Europe During World War Ii, Abigail M. Currier Jan 2017

A Different Way Of Touring Europe; One Aid Man's Journey Across Europe During World War Ii, Abigail M. Currier

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Robert Bell Bradley enlisted in the United States Army in October of 1942 as an aid man. He spent several months training to be a first responder on the front lines of combat and learning how to deal with a variety of issues. He was then attached to the 30th Infantry Division and sent to England in preparation for operation OVERLORD and the D-Day Invasion. Two months later, he was captured by the Germans and this event began a year long journey filled with death and near misses. [1] While Bradley’s experiences cannot speak for all prisoner of ...


“La Bretagne Aux Bretons?” : Cultural Revival And Redefinition Of Brittany In Post-1945 France, Gabriella L. Hornbeck Jan 2013

“La Bretagne Aux Bretons?” : Cultural Revival And Redefinition Of Brittany In Post-1945 France, Gabriella L. Hornbeck

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

A sense of national identity in France is something that has been defined and redefined throughout the twentieth century. With a history that includes two world wars, the creation of the European Union, in addition the the notable action of decolonization on the part of France, particularly in Indo-China and Algeria, there have been evident increases in immigration into France in recent history. These actions have forced France, as a nation, to question what its identity really is, particularly in terms of its cultural identity. In addition to these immigrants who may arrive from former French colonies, however, there are ...


"You Must All Be Interned": Identity Among Internees In Great Britain During World War Ii, Elizabeth A. Atkins Jan 2005

"You Must All Be Interned": Identity Among Internees In Great Britain During World War Ii, Elizabeth A. Atkins

The Gettysburg Historical Journal

Between 1933 and 1940, the United States, Great Britain and most other developed nations saw an influx of German refugees entering their borders attempting to be free of the tyranny of Hitler’s National Socialism. Many of those fleeing from Germany were intellectuals: authors, teachers, artists, or thinkers who faced persecution in their homeland. For the men, women, and children who chose the British Isles as their new home, Great Britain symbolized hope for a life free from persecution. By 1941, however, many refugees from Germany found themselves arrested and put into camps, not by the Nazis, but by their ...