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Full-Text Articles in European History

Cuckoldry And The “Gone For A Soldier” Narrative: Infidelity And Performance Among Eighteenth-Century English Plebeians, Elias Hubbard May 2019

Cuckoldry And The “Gone For A Soldier” Narrative: Infidelity And Performance Among Eighteenth-Century English Plebeians, Elias Hubbard

Lawrence University Honors Projects

This project addresses existing historical arguments about the role of performance in eighteenth-century English plebeian infidelity cases, identifying some of the cultural scripts available to married men and women from popular texts in order to better understand cases of infidelity in contemporary plebeian marriages. The thesis seeks to clarify the effect of infidelity on a plebeian individual’s social standing and relationships, and to draw conclusions about the nature of plebeian infidelity, marriage, and gender in England through the long eighteenth century.

While examining contemporary public texts of cuckoldry, I address how homosocial behavior appears in narratives of cuckoldry, how ...


Vile Blood: Hereditary Degeneracy In Victorian England, Dalton Lee Brock May 2019

Vile Blood: Hereditary Degeneracy In Victorian England, Dalton Lee Brock

Theses and Dissertations from 2019

During the late 1800s, the people of England grew anxious about hereditary degeneracy. That anxiety was rooted in the medical literature of the Victorian period. Nature predetermined individuals to be either healthy or unhealthy. Unhealthy individuals were marked by degenerative mental or physical characteristics such as epilepsy. Medical professionals, including Henry Maudsley, emphasized reversion and its hereditary nature as a threat to individuals and society. All based their works and arguments on Charles Darwin’s idea of inheritance. Darwin, in turn, had adopted and modified Lamarckian inheritance to make up for the absence of an inheritance principle in his theory ...


Book Review Of King & Etty's England And Scotland, 1286-1603, Austin M. Setter Jan 2019

Book Review Of King & Etty's England And Scotland, 1286-1603, Austin M. Setter

The Hilltop Review

This review addresses the strengths and weaknesses of Andy King and Claire Etty's 2016 book England and Scotland, 1286-1603.


Remembering Agincourt: An Analysis Of King Henry V'S Impact On English National Identity, Nathan C. Harkey May 2018

Remembering Agincourt: An Analysis Of King Henry V'S Impact On English National Identity, Nathan C. Harkey

Tenor of Our Times

King Henry V is one of the best remembered monarchs in English History. Although he died at the untimely age of 36 after only nine years on the throne, his reign saw England's empire in France reach its highest point, an accomplishment that was actualized in the of the Battle of Agincourt. In the six centuries since, both Henry's reign as a whole and the battle itself have impacted the identity of the English nation in many ways. This paper analyzes the influence of these events on those who followed, ranging from the use of heraldry after the ...


Ms-220: Homer W. Schweppe Papers, Abigail E. Metheny Mar 2018

Ms-220: Homer W. Schweppe Papers, Abigail E. Metheny

All Finding Aids

This collection is made up of a vast variety of materials pertaining to Homer William Schweppe’s experiences during World War II. Schweppe compiled various items during his initial military service in the United States, such as his Seattle Port Officer I.D. badge and his uniform patches. There are also items from his time at Camp Ritchie, including his glossary of “Nazi Deutsch” terms and a book on the Order of Battle of the German Army, to which he contributed. Schweppe also included items he collected while overseas, such as a German Map of the D-Day Invasion area, a ...


Transnational Nationalists: Cosmopolitan Women, Philanthropy, And Italian State-Building, 1850-1890, Diana Moore Feb 2018

Transnational Nationalists: Cosmopolitan Women, Philanthropy, And Italian State-Building, 1850-1890, Diana Moore

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

“Transnational Nationalists: Cosmopolitan Women, Philanthropy and Italian State-Building, 1850-1890” is a study of Protestant and Jewish transnational reforming women who took advantage of a period of fluidity to act as non-state actors and impact Italian unification and liberation, a process known as the Risorgimento, and subsequent Italian state-building. Inspired by Giuseppe Mazzini’s spiritual brand of romantic cosmopolitan nationalism, as well as Giuseppe Garibaldi’s military campaigns, and believing that women had a god-given duty to provide education, morality, and uplift to oppressed groups, they worked to provide Italy not only with physical unification but also moral regeneration. Through an ...


A Dramaturgical Exploration: Setting Oliver Goldsmith’S She Stoops To Conquer In Post-Civil War Virginia, Amanda Ward Dec 2017

A Dramaturgical Exploration: Setting Oliver Goldsmith’S She Stoops To Conquer In Post-Civil War Virginia, Amanda Ward

Senior Honors Theses

A reputable theatrical company will hire a dramaturg to implement historical research and to provide reputable information where the director or staff desires it. They ensure that the play’s elements are as truthful to the time period as possible and aid in a performance’s overall success. If a theatrical company were to set Oliver Goldsmith’s play She Stoops to Conquer in 1870 Virginia, it could strengthen the play’s underlying religious, political, and cultural elements.

The paper is comprised of seven sections: a biography of the playwright, a religious exploration, a political analysis, a cultural comparison, a ...


Depictions Of Catholic And Protestant Bodies In Elizabeth (Dir. Kapur, 1998), Jennifer M. Desilva, Alison R. Orewiler Sep 2017

Depictions Of Catholic And Protestant Bodies In Elizabeth (Dir. Kapur, 1998), Jennifer M. Desilva, Alison R. Orewiler

Journal of Religion & Film

This article uses the film Elizabeth (dir. Kapur, 1998) as a portal for understanding the interstices between modern and early modern conceptions of religion as it is read on the body. Elizabeth examines the period of religious and political unrest immediately before and after the coronation of Queen Elizabeth I (r. 1558-1603), compressing the late 1550s through the early 1570s into a comprehensive statement on the relationship between the body, heresy, and corruption. This article investigates how lower body activities and functions, like dancing, sex, and defecation, were linked in both the film and early modern minds to immorality, corruption ...


Products Of Circumstance: Eighteenth-Century Runaway Indentured Servant Advertisements In A Changing Atlantic World, Amanda Page Mcgee Aug 2017

Products Of Circumstance: Eighteenth-Century Runaway Indentured Servant Advertisements In A Changing Atlantic World, Amanda Page Mcgee

Theses and Dissertations

Although indentured servitude remained a viable source of labor in colonial America and eighteenth-century England, newspaper advertisements demonstrated the transformations of the perceptions associated with indentured servants in the midst of a changing Atlantic World. Not only were indentured servants perceived as a type of commodity in the rising consumerist culture of the eighteenth century; but, the perceptions of these individuals – reflected in runaway newspaper advertisements – changed depending upon the political, social, and economic circumstances in which they existed. The volatile nature of colonial life combined with the social, economic, and political implications of the changing Atlantic World, complicated the ...


Anne Boleyn: Living A Thousand Lives Forever, Amanda S. Nicholson May 2017

Anne Boleyn: Living A Thousand Lives Forever, Amanda S. Nicholson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Writers and historians from earlier centuries imagined Anne Boleyn as a villain; a forward and evil woman intent on destroying Henry VII and his image. Modern accounts have been more accommodating, offering that she was misunderstood due to the constraints of the times. In an attempt to discover the historical Anne, I will be comparing and contrasting how she has been perceived in fiction and non-fiction literature, and will examine how the perception of Anne has shifted through time.


Displays Of Power In English Tudor Painting, Laura Meisner Mar 2017

Displays Of Power In English Tudor Painting, Laura Meisner

Undergraduate Theses and Capstone Projects

History passes down the visages of Tudor monarchs and their contemporaries through paintings that attempt to show us more than their mere likenesses. The faces of these monarchs reveal not only individual physiognomies of appearance, but also characteristics of the times. Painting in Tudor England, up to the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1485-1558) reflected, and at times contributed, to shifting political and social structures in England. Patrons exercised great influence on the kind of art created and brought into England, and a study of this and how patrons utilized art as a means of propaganda reveals the way that ...


Daily Life In 18th-Century England, 2nd Ed. [Review], Michael Hawkins Jan 2017

Daily Life In 18th-Century England, 2nd Ed. [Review], Michael Hawkins

University Libraries Publications

No abstract provided.


The Shifting Dynamics Of Midwifery In Urban Seventeenth-Century England, Virginia E. Taylor Jan 2017

The Shifting Dynamics Of Midwifery In Urban Seventeenth-Century England, Virginia E. Taylor

Masters Theses

Midwives have been unfairly represented in contemporary studies about the profession in urban Early Modern England. Midwives were actually quite intelligent and capable women beyond their skills in the environs of the birthing chamber. These women contributed significantly to their surrounding community in public and private spheres from the birthing chamber to the courts of law. Most urban midwives were highly skilled and knowledgeable in their craft based upon their many years of hands-on education in comparison to the university and book-learned preparation of male-midwives or physicians. These trained women were also literate and openly defended their profession against the ...


Inventing Saladin: The Role Of The Saladin Legend In European Culture And Identity, Brian C. David Jan 2017

Inventing Saladin: The Role Of The Saladin Legend In European Culture And Identity, Brian C. David

Masters Theses

This thesis seeks to uncover and understand the strange historical journey of the Muslim Sultan Yusuf ibn Ayyub, known to the West as Saladin. The historic Saladin was a ruler famous for his successful campaigns against the Crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem, his victory at the Battle of Hattin, and his holding action against the Third Crusade. Upon Saladin’s death in 1193, he became the subject of numerous legends, most of which describe him as a merciful, chivalric, and ideal leader of men. The epitome of what a thirteenth century European noble was supposed to be. This thesis seek to ...


Prudery And Perversion: Domination Of The Sexual Body In Middle-Class Men, Women, And Disenfranchised Bodies In Victorian England, Ashley Barnett Dec 2016

Prudery And Perversion: Domination Of The Sexual Body In Middle-Class Men, Women, And Disenfranchised Bodies In Victorian England, Ashley Barnett

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This research argues that with the rise of the middle-class, Victorian England saw the development of a power model in which middle-class men, middle-class women and disenfranchised bodies of children and lower-class women suffered from the demands of bodily domination. Because the bodily health of middle-class men was believed to represent national health, it was imperative that he dominate his body, particularly with regard to sexual urges. Consequently, the bodies of women with whom he sought sexual release suffered from forms of bodily domination as well. Through an analysis of journals and private writings of those living in Victorian England ...


A Watchman On The Walls: Ezekiel And Reaction To Invasion In Anglo-Saxon England, Max K. Brinson May 2016

A Watchman On The Walls: Ezekiel And Reaction To Invasion In Anglo-Saxon England, Max K. Brinson

Theses and Dissertations

During the Viking Age, the Christian Anglo-Saxons in England found warnings and solace in the biblical text of Ezekiel. In this text, the God of Israel delivers a dual warning: first, the sins of the people call upon themselves divine wrath; second, it is incumbent upon God’s messenger to warn the people of their extreme danger, or else find their blood on his hands. This thesis examines how the Anglo-Saxon applied Ezekiel’s warnings to their own cultural crisis. It begins with the early development of this philosophy by the Britons in the 500s, its adoption by the Anglo-Saxons ...


Reforming 'The Sacred': Standardization Of Church Space In Laudian England (1633-1641), Ashley Fierstadt Jan 2016

Reforming 'The Sacred': Standardization Of Church Space In Laudian England (1633-1641), Ashley Fierstadt

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

The break from the Catholic Church and the formation of the Anglican Church of England in 1547 resulted in a tumultuous eighty-year period of redefining church doctrine. In the 1620s, the Church of England recognized that it still lacked cohesion and sound doctrine; thus, King Charles I (r. 1625-1649) and Archbishop William Laud (1633-1641) sought to bring the diverse ideas and sects of Christianity together under one unified church. Other historians have touched upon the concept of sacred space in England during this period; I argue that debates of sacred space are embedded in these attempts at unifying the Anglican ...


Stoking The Fires: The Relationship Between Mary Tudor And Eustace Chapuys, 1529-1545, Derek Michael Taylor Jan 2016

Stoking The Fires: The Relationship Between Mary Tudor And Eustace Chapuys, 1529-1545, Derek Michael Taylor

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

Most published research regarding the court of King Henry VIII and the early years of the English Reformation has relied upon the correspondence of ambassador Eustace Chapuys. Although Chapuys’ assessments of the goings on in England at the time have been often disputed among scholars in regard to their accuracy, little research has been attempted to understand the man writing the letters that have so frequently been cited. During his sixteen years as ambassador Chapuys became a close friend of Henry’s eldest living child, Mary Tudor, who later became Queen Mary I. This relationship has previously gone unexplored. This ...


The Development Of An English Antislavery Identity In The Eighteenth Century, John Gilbert Hyatt Jan 2016

The Development Of An English Antislavery Identity In The Eighteenth Century, John Gilbert Hyatt

CMC Senior Theses

This thesis explores the growth of antislavery sentiment in the English-speaking world during the eighteenth century. I examine the institutional processes, transatlantic discourses, and ideological schema with which individuals and groups reformulated their identities as a means of extricating themselves from slavery's various social, economic, and ethical implications. I argue that abolitionism in England is best understood as the cumulative outcome to a series of identity reconstructions, and that a Histoire des Mentalités, as drawn from the Annales School, is an apt methodology for unmasking the structural underpinnings of an antislavery identity.


The Social Impact Of The Hundred Years War On The Societies Of England And France, Kody E. Whittington Jan 2016

The Social Impact Of The Hundred Years War On The Societies Of England And France, Kody E. Whittington

Honors Undergraduate Theses

The Hundred Years War was a series of conflicts from 1337 to 1453 waged between the House of Plantagenet of England and the House of Valois of France. This thesis will analyze the affect that the Hundred Years War had on the societies of both England and France, and in doing so will show that the war was a catalyst for bringing England and France out of what is recognized as the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance and Early Modern Period. The thesis will do this by looking at three sections of English and French society: the royalty and ...


A Supplication For The Beggars: The Arguments Of Simon Fish And The Cultural Relevance Of His Writing In Sixteenth Century England, Charlotte Mcfaddin Dec 2015

A Supplication For The Beggars: The Arguments Of Simon Fish And The Cultural Relevance Of His Writing In Sixteenth Century England, Charlotte Mcfaddin

Student Research

No abstract provided.


The Drink Of A Thousand Kisses: Coffeehouse Culture In 16th Century England, Derek A. Haas Oct 2015

The Drink Of A Thousand Kisses: Coffeehouse Culture In 16th Century England, Derek A. Haas

Student Research

The purpose of this paper is to understand the history of coffeehouses in Early Modern England and how they affected the public sphere. Coffeehouses changed the way English citizens did business, socialized, and engaged in politics. At different points, coffee was opposed by different social orders, women, and even Charles II himself. The tiniest thing became one of the most controversial items of the 16th century.


The Decline Of Christianity In Modern Europe, David C. Taylor Jr May 2015

The Decline Of Christianity In Modern Europe, David C. Taylor Jr

David C Taylor Jr

Europe was once considered the epicenter of the Christian religion. For centuries Christianity was not only the main religion of Europe it was also a main political power. The Roman Catholic church, and in turn the Christian faith, enjoyed great power at various times throughout history in the European countries and influenced the culture in many ways. However, today there has been a moral and spiritual decline in Europe of staggering numbers. This short essay will explore possible reasons for Christianity’s decline in Europe in the last century and whether or not there is a possibility that the church ...


The Matter Of Jerusalem: The Holy Land In Angevin Court Culture And Identity, C. 1154-1216, Katherine Lee Hodges-Kluck May 2015

The Matter Of Jerusalem: The Holy Land In Angevin Court Culture And Identity, C. 1154-1216, Katherine Lee Hodges-Kluck

Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation reshapes our understanding of the mechanics of nation-building and the construction of national identities in the Middle Ages, placing medieval England in a wider European and Mediterranean context. I argue that a coherent English national identity, transcending the social and linguistic differences of the post-Norman Conquest period, took shape at the end of the twelfth century. A vital component of this process was the development of an ideology that intimately connected the geography, peoples, and mythical histories of England and the Holy Land. Proponents of this ideology envisioned England as an allegorical new Jerusalem inhabited by a chosen ...


Moving The Plague: The Movement Of People And The Spread Of Bubonic Plague In Fourteenth Century Through Eighteenth Century Europe, Gillian R. Fowler May 2015

Moving The Plague: The Movement Of People And The Spread Of Bubonic Plague In Fourteenth Century Through Eighteenth Century Europe, Gillian R. Fowler

Honors Theses

Research regarding the Yersinia Pestis (bubonic plague) in later medieval and early modern Europe has focused mainly on rat fleas and their role in transmitting the bacteria. This research focuses on people and their day to day movements and how that relates to the spread of bubonic plague across the following three areas of Europe, England, France and northern Italy during the time period between the fourteenth and eighteenth centuries. The changing belief system regarding the cause of these outbreaks emerges within these medieval Europeans which helps to facilitate the growing response to plague outbreaks and the affirmative actions taken ...


"Too Young To Fall Asleep Forever": Great War Commemoration And National Identity In Interwar England And Germany, Angela Clem Apr 2015

"Too Young To Fall Asleep Forever": Great War Commemoration And National Identity In Interwar England And Germany, Angela Clem

History Honors Projects

This thesis compares English and German commemorative practices after the Great War. In England, commemoration strengthened national identity by giving value to communal suffering and creating an almost-mythical figure in the Unknown Warrior, an anonymous soldier buried in Westminster Abbey. In contrast, German commemoration met with political instability, hyperinflation, and the infamous “war guilt clause” of the Versailles Treaty, which rejected a national mode of commemoration. Despite these differences, both countries constructed a new “language of loss” physically (through memorials) and metaphorically (through war literature), forever shaping their respective national identities and collective memories.


Breaking The Back: The Continuous Battle Over The Bank Of England 1694-1715, Brendan Callanan Jun 2014

Breaking The Back: The Continuous Battle Over The Bank Of England 1694-1715, Brendan Callanan

Honors Theses

England during the seventeenth century experienced unprecedented political and economic transformation. The rise and fall of the British monarchy, the subsequent political ascendance of Parliament and centralization of the state, sustained economic and commercial growth, and incessant wars abroad during the latter years of the century, contributed to a volatile political climate during the final years of the 1600s that contrasted greatly with the landscape earlier in the century. Specifically, said developments especially affected England’s landed aristocracy. Their cherished ideology of order suffered significant setbacks as both the expanded reach of the state and the new economic ideology that ...


The 'Art' Of Majesty: Displaying The Stuart Monarchy, 1603-1714, Fabrice Le Yon Louis-Broyld Apr 2014

The 'Art' Of Majesty: Displaying The Stuart Monarchy, 1603-1714, Fabrice Le Yon Louis-Broyld

History Master's Theses

After the much beloved, but single and childless, Elizabeth Tudor, the Stuarts of Scotland were next in line for the throne of England. They came to power in a century of political change fo the Monarchy. The 'Art' of Majesty looks at how the Stuarts attempted to display itself to the world. Serving a more political rather than artistic purpose, these portraits hide much more than they reveal. At a time when the Monarchy needed to project idealized images of majesty, it is these hidden stories which are often the most valuable.


Arrival From Abroad: Plague, Quarantine, And Concepts Of Contagion In Eighteenth-Century England, Talei Ml Hickey Jan 2014

Arrival From Abroad: Plague, Quarantine, And Concepts Of Contagion In Eighteenth-Century England, Talei Ml Hickey

History Undergraduate Theses

The isolation and separation of infected individuals in response to epidemics has persevered throughout history as an effective public health measure. Since the devastation of the Black Death during the fourteenth century, major European cities continued to institute various forms of quarantine in order to address the threat of plague. Following the Great Plague of London in 1665-66 – the last major outbreak of bubonic plague to occur in England – the country had no way of knowing it would never again be visited by the disease in its epidemic form. In the eighteenth century, Parliament took measures aimed at preventing outbreaks ...


Finding The Witch’S Mark: Female Participation In The Judicial System During The Hopkins Trials 1645-47, Shannon M. Lundquist Jan 2014

Finding The Witch’S Mark: Female Participation In The Judicial System During The Hopkins Trials 1645-47, Shannon M. Lundquist

Departmental Honors Projects

Between the years of 1645 and 1647 in East Anglia, a series of witch trials known as the Hopkins Trials took place. In all, 250 witches were accused and 100 hanged. The ability to convict a person of the crime of witchcraft relied heavily on evidence which was hard to come by given the nature of the crime of witchcraft. Tangible proof of an intangible crime was needed; this came in the form of witch’s marks. To the learned population, marks were a symbol of the witch’s covenant with the devil. To the lay person, they were called ...