Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

European History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in European History

Prudery And Perversion: Domination Of The Sexual Body In Middle-Class Men, Women, And Disenfranchised Bodies In Victorian England, Ashley Barnett Dec 2016

Prudery And Perversion: Domination Of The Sexual Body In Middle-Class Men, Women, And Disenfranchised Bodies In Victorian England, Ashley Barnett

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

This research argues that with the rise of the middle-class, Victorian England saw the development of a power model in which middle-class men, middle-class women and disenfranchised bodies of children and lower-class women suffered from the demands of bodily domination. Because the bodily health of middle-class men was believed to represent national health, it was imperative that he dominate his body, particularly with regard to sexual urges. Consequently, the bodies of women with whom he sought sexual release suffered from forms of bodily domination as well. Through an analysis of journals and private writings of those living in Victorian England ...


A Watchman On The Walls: Ezekiel And Reaction To Invasion In Anglo-Saxon England, Max K. Brinson May 2016

A Watchman On The Walls: Ezekiel And Reaction To Invasion In Anglo-Saxon England, Max K. Brinson

Theses and Dissertations

During the Viking Age, the Christian Anglo-Saxons in England found warnings and solace in the biblical text of Ezekiel. In this text, the God of Israel delivers a dual warning: first, the sins of the people call upon themselves divine wrath; second, it is incumbent upon God’s messenger to warn the people of their extreme danger, or else find their blood on his hands. This thesis examines how the Anglo-Saxon applied Ezekiel’s warnings to their own cultural crisis. It begins with the early development of this philosophy by the Britons in the 500s, its adoption by the Anglo-Saxons ...


Stoking The Fires: The Relationship Between Mary Tudor And Eustace Chapuys, 1529-1545, Derek Michael Taylor Jan 2016

Stoking The Fires: The Relationship Between Mary Tudor And Eustace Chapuys, 1529-1545, Derek Michael Taylor

Theses, Dissertations and Capstones

Most published research regarding the court of King Henry VIII and the early years of the English Reformation has relied upon the correspondence of ambassador Eustace Chapuys. Although Chapuys’ assessments of the goings on in England at the time have been often disputed among scholars in regard to their accuracy, little research has been attempted to understand the man writing the letters that have so frequently been cited. During his sixteen years as ambassador Chapuys became a close friend of Henry’s eldest living child, Mary Tudor, who later became Queen Mary I. This relationship has previously gone unexplored. This ...


Reforming 'The Sacred': Standardization Of Church Space In Laudian England (1633-1641), Ashley Fierstadt Jan 2016

Reforming 'The Sacred': Standardization Of Church Space In Laudian England (1633-1641), Ashley Fierstadt

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

The break from the Catholic Church and the formation of the Anglican Church of England in 1547 resulted in a tumultuous eighty-year period of redefining church doctrine. In the 1620s, the Church of England recognized that it still lacked cohesion and sound doctrine; thus, King Charles I (r. 1625-1649) and Archbishop William Laud (1633-1641) sought to bring the diverse ideas and sects of Christianity together under one unified church. Other historians have touched upon the concept of sacred space in England during this period; I argue that debates of sacred space are embedded in these attempts at unifying the Anglican ...


The Development Of An English Antislavery Identity In The Eighteenth Century, John Gilbert Hyatt Jan 2016

The Development Of An English Antislavery Identity In The Eighteenth Century, John Gilbert Hyatt

CMC Senior Theses

This thesis explores the growth of antislavery sentiment in the English-speaking world during the eighteenth century. I examine the institutional processes, transatlantic discourses, and ideological schema with which individuals and groups reformulated their identities as a means of extricating themselves from slavery's various social, economic, and ethical implications. I argue that abolitionism in England is best understood as the cumulative outcome to a series of identity reconstructions, and that a Histoire des Mentalités, as drawn from the Annales School, is an apt methodology for unmasking the structural underpinnings of an antislavery identity.


The Social Impact Of The Hundred Years War On The Societies Of England And France, Kody E. Whittington Jan 2016

The Social Impact Of The Hundred Years War On The Societies Of England And France, Kody E. Whittington

Honors Undergraduate Theses

The Hundred Years War was a series of conflicts from 1337 to 1453 waged between the House of Plantagenet of England and the House of Valois of France. This thesis will analyze the affect that the Hundred Years War had on the societies of both England and France, and in doing so will show that the war was a catalyst for bringing England and France out of what is recognized as the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance and Early Modern Period. The thesis will do this by looking at three sections of English and French society: the royalty and ...