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European History Commons

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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in European History

Bethlehem Chapel: How A Place Can Be Reinterpreted By Government, Maya Lemaster Nov 2016

Bethlehem Chapel: How A Place Can Be Reinterpreted By Government, Maya Lemaster

Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

An important source of legitimacy for all types of government is the creation of or building up of a sense of nationhood for the citizens of the state. This can be achieved in many ways, including through the use of physical nationalist symbols. In my paper, I address this topic by exploring how the Communist government of Czechoslovakia reinterpreted and changed the traditional meaning of the historical Bethlehem Chapel in Prague in order to fit their own ideology. I found that the Communist government emphasized the communal aspects of the Hussite movement and ignored religious associations. My research is primarily ...


Review: Sylvia Martin, 'Ink In Her Veins: The Troubled Life Of Aileen Palmer', (Crawley: Uwa Publishing, 2016)., Rowan Cahill Oct 2016

Review: Sylvia Martin, 'Ink In Her Veins: The Troubled Life Of Aileen Palmer', (Crawley: Uwa Publishing, 2016)., Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Review of Sylvia Martin's study (2016) of Australian poet, Spanish Civil War veteran, WW11 Ambulance driver, translator, Aileen Palmer and her life and times. 


Review: Sylvia Martin, 'Ink In Her Veins: The Troubled Life Of Aileen Palmer', (Crawley: Uwa Publishing, 2016)., Rowan Cahill Oct 2016

Review: Sylvia Martin, 'Ink In Her Veins: The Troubled Life Of Aileen Palmer', (Crawley: Uwa Publishing, 2016)., Rowan Cahill

Rowan Cahill

Review of Sylvia Martin's study (2016) of Australian poet, Spanish Civil War veteran, WW11 Ambulance driver, translator, Aileen Palmer and her life and times. 


Soviet Kitsch During Stalin's Purges, Jenna Marco Oct 2016

Soviet Kitsch During Stalin's Purges, Jenna Marco

Oglethorpe Journal of Undergraduate Research

This article explores the applications of Modris Eksteins' concept of kitsch to Stalin's reign in the Soviet Union, particularly the period of the Party purges in the 1930s. It traces the construction and development of Soviet kitsch under Stalin in the political, social, cultural, and artistic spheres. Overall, the article argues that the presence of kitsch was ultimately harmful to Soviet politics and culture. In conclusion, the article briefly poses the question of whether or not kitsch fully died out in the Soviet Union after the death of Stalin, and if kitsch is still present in current Russian politics ...