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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in European History

Eugenics And Racial Hygiene: The Connections Between The United States And Germany, Nicholas Baker Jan 2016

Eugenics And Racial Hygiene: The Connections Between The United States And Germany, Nicholas Baker

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

During the 1910s-1930s eugenics movement, communications zipped between the German and American eugenicists; this movement was directed towards better breeding in human beings to weed out the unfit who were supposedly plaguing society. Most research has predominantly focused on the eugenics movements within individual countries and not the interplay between them. Through letters, pamphlets, propaganda, and research conducted by eugenics organizations, my research explores the contact between movements and focuses on the exchange itself. A pamphlet produced by the Human Betterment Foundation entitled best illustrates the exchange of ideas. It was created in 1934, and argued in favor of the ...


The Violent Revolution: Nationalism And The 1989 Romanian Revolution, Allan Chet Emmons Jan 2016

The Violent Revolution: Nationalism And The 1989 Romanian Revolution, Allan Chet Emmons

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

This paper attempts to find connections between Romanian leader Nicolae Ceausescu’s brand of Nationalism and the violent government reaction to protesters in 1989. It examines how the territories of Bessarabia and Transylvania led Romania to hold negative opinions of the other members of the Warsaw Pact and the Hungarian minority within Romania. In addition, it examines the distrust that cropped up between Romania and the other members of the Warsaw Pact following the 1968 invasion of Czechoslovakia. A mixture of distrust of minorities and the other members of the Warsaw Pact led to the violent government reaction to the ...


The Nuremberg Laws: Creating The Road To The T-4 Program, Jennifer V. Hight Jan 2016

The Nuremberg Laws: Creating The Road To The T-4 Program, Jennifer V. Hight

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

On September 15, 1935 the Nazi party announced a new series of laws codes that legally cemented the principles of Nazi ideology: The Nuremberg Laws. The Nuremberg Laws were composed of three parts. One, the “Reich Citizenship Law” revoked the status of Jews as legal citizens and created the framework the Nazis would use to persecute by defining what it meant to be German or Jewish; later the laws were expanded by the Nazis to label minorities as non-German citizens. The “Laws of the Protection of Hereditary Health” stated that anyone the Nazis deemed as carrying inheritable diseases would be ...


The Assertion Of English Royal Authority In The American Colonies And Royal Revenue: 1651-1701, Benjamin Lesh Jan 2016

The Assertion Of English Royal Authority In The American Colonies And Royal Revenue: 1651-1701, Benjamin Lesh

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

English royal colonial policy began to take shape after the end of the English Civil War and the Interregnum in 1660. The English crown implemented a series of policies aimed at centralizing monarchical rule over the American colonies in order to utilize potential revenue sources from the colonies. Parliament was unwilling to grant the king new taxes, so the monarchy needed to find new sources of revenue to utilize. This research analyzes English trade legislation and English colonial policies as they pertain to the generation of royal revenues and the direct administration of the American colonies.


Reforming 'The Sacred': Standardization Of Church Space In Laudian England (1633-1641), Ashley Fierstadt Jan 2016

Reforming 'The Sacred': Standardization Of Church Space In Laudian England (1633-1641), Ashley Fierstadt

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

The break from the Catholic Church and the formation of the Anglican Church of England in 1547 resulted in a tumultuous eighty-year period of redefining church doctrine. In the 1620s, the Church of England recognized that it still lacked cohesion and sound doctrine; thus, King Charles I (r. 1625-1649) and Archbishop William Laud (1633-1641) sought to bring the diverse ideas and sects of Christianity together under one unified church. Other historians have touched upon the concept of sacred space in England during this period; I argue that debates of sacred space are embedded in these attempts at unifying the Anglican ...


Giving Voice To Silent Destruction, Michelle A. Smail Jan 2016

Giving Voice To Silent Destruction, Michelle A. Smail

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

German author W. G. Sebald (1944-2001) studied how historical methodology contributed to this alienation of various groups, particularly World War II Germans, and the consequences of that alienation so that he could develop and use historical countermeasures in his own writing. Sebald’s unique approach advocated for a genre of history that moved beyond narratives of nations, eras, victims, and perpetrators to promote constructive discussions with an awareness of their relevance to the present. Sebald’s refusal to ignore any part of the past resulted in his life-long study of what he called a conspiracy of silence in Germany, regarding ...


The Irish Theology: Formation Of Celtic Christianity In Ireland (5th To 9th Century), Emma M. Foster Jan 2016

The Irish Theology: Formation Of Celtic Christianity In Ireland (5th To 9th Century), Emma M. Foster

Student Theses, Papers and Projects (History)

The conversion process of Ireland resulted in a culture that reflected both its pagan, Celtic roots and the new Christian ontology. From the fifth to ninth century, Ireland’s learned elite began to be converted to Christianity and created the early monastic settlements that shaped how Christianity was introduced. The interactions between the early Irish monastic founders and the pre-Christian Irish influenced the ways in which early monasteries were established and why Christianity was introduced the way it was. By establishing the Christian faith on the basis of Irish learning, the early church worked with the learned men to establish ...