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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in European History

Minding The Gap: Uncovering The Underground's Role In The Formation Of Modern London, 1855-1945, Danielle K. Dodson Jan 2016

Minding The Gap: Uncovering The Underground's Role In The Formation Of Modern London, 1855-1945, Danielle K. Dodson

Theses and Dissertations--History

My research examines how the London Underground – the first subway in the world - provided new public spaces and forms of mobility that redefined how Londoners interacted in, moved through, and imaged the city.

Perhaps nothing embodies the Underground’s iconic status in London quite as completely as the phrase, “Mind the Gap.” This phrase, which originally referred to the gap between the train and the platform at Embankment station on the Northern line, has since become an enduringly popular symbol of London in the minds of travelers and visitors. The fact that a behavioral command about how to move through ...


An Internal Dilemma: Different Approaches To Handling Melancholia In Early Modern Spanish Religious Orders, Jesse T. Nau Jan 2016

An Internal Dilemma: Different Approaches To Handling Melancholia In Early Modern Spanish Religious Orders, Jesse T. Nau

Theses and Dissertations--History

This study argues that religious orders in early modern Spain developed informal sets of procedures to handle the consequences of melancholia in their communities. It also argues that three influential members of these orders, San Ignacio de Loyola of the Jesuits, and San Teresa de Avila and San Juan de la Cruz of the Discalced Carmelites, tailored these protocols according to their own private concerns and experience with the disease. The changing discourse surrounding melancholia and similar diseases during the early modern period, alongside the unique environmental concerns of these newly founded orders, created a need for new methods of ...


Negotiating An Electorate: Gender, Class, And The British Reform Acts, Jill Marie Abney Jan 2016

Negotiating An Electorate: Gender, Class, And The British Reform Acts, Jill Marie Abney

Theses and Dissertations--History

Five Reform Acts passed over the course of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries gradually increased the size of the British electorate. Negotiations over lowering property, rent, and lodging restrictions led to new Acts that slowly increased the number of Britons deemed worthy to vote. This dissertation examines the extent class and gender were relevant to those negotiations of British citizenship over the course of those five Acts. The project scrutinizes the language used in Parliamentary debates, political pamphlets, and political correspondence to reconstruct the constantly-changing conceptualization of the ideal citizen’s gendered identity in Britain and Europe. This project illuminates ...


The Language Of Race In Revolutionary France And Saint-Domingue, 1789-1792, Jeffery L. Stanley Jan 2016

The Language Of Race In Revolutionary France And Saint-Domingue, 1789-1792, Jeffery L. Stanley

Theses and Dissertations--History

This project studies the historical development of racialist language during the French Revolution as politicians, free people of color, and colonial whites debated the political status of France’s free people of color population. It examines the negotiation of a racialist language that bolstered colonial racial hierarchies with an egalitarian language that sought to level the corporate structures of the Old Regime. I look especially at the ways that language served as a management device to articulate and legitimize new relationships of power in the political culture of the French Revolution. I connect developments in France to the colonies by ...