Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

European History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in European History

Warrior Bishops: The Development Of The Fighting Clergy Under The Ottonians In The Tenth Century, Jordan N. Becker Jan 2016

Warrior Bishops: The Development Of The Fighting Clergy Under The Ottonians In The Tenth Century, Jordan N. Becker

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The Ottonian Empire in Germany experienced numerous wars, invasions, and rebellions over the course of the tenth century. Because the royal family practiced an itinerant form of rule, they established an infrastructure of ecclesiastical establishments that facilitated the royal household’s movements and defended the rest of the realm. It was here that the fighting clergy, or the bishops and abbots who actually took up military command, became a crucial component of the empire’s stability and protection.


La Grande Nation: The Revolutionary Tradition In French West Africa, Michael Rupert Jan 2016

La Grande Nation: The Revolutionary Tradition In French West Africa, Michael Rupert

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Historically, France has garnered a reputation for being one of the most enlightened nations due to its progressive policies and having produced so many enlightenment thinkers. In imperial historiography, a similar assertion is often made about French West Africa. Historians and Frenchmen alike often make claims about the altruistic nature of the French empire and frequently point out efforts undertaken in French West Africa to significantly develop the federation and aid the Africans in need. In this thesis I will provide a much more nuanced look at the condition of French West Africa as it existed from 1870-1930. In this ...


The End Of The State Of Autonomies? An Analysis Of The Controversy Surrounding The 2010 Spanish Constitutional Court Ruling On Catalonia's 2006 Statute Of Autonomy, Kevin Mermel Jan 2016

The End Of The State Of Autonomies? An Analysis Of The Controversy Surrounding The 2010 Spanish Constitutional Court Ruling On Catalonia's 2006 Statute Of Autonomy, Kevin Mermel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In recent years, many citizens in the Spanish region of Catalonia have mobilized in favor of independence, a desire previously far outside the mainstream. As of the spring of 2016, separatists control the majority of seats in Catalan parliament. This study seeks to explain why independence is so widely supported in Catalonia, and focuses specifically on the region’s 2006 Statute of Autonomy, which the Spanish Constitutional Court modified in a 2010 ruling. The struggles that the statute faced both before and after the court’s 2010 ruling provided a crucial turning point in the debate over Catalan independence. The ...


From King’S African Rifles To Kenya Rifles: The Decolonization And Transition Of An African Army, 1960-1970, Christian A. Harrison Jan 2016

From King’S African Rifles To Kenya Rifles: The Decolonization And Transition Of An African Army, 1960-1970, Christian A. Harrison

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis explores the post-colonial relationship between the Kenya Army and the British Military. It addresses the colonial legacies of the Kenya Rifles, as well its transition from colonial army to national independent army. By understanding the various discourses that existed in the King's African Rifles, as well how those discourses impacted the independent Kenya Rifles, this thesis details the decolonization, transition, and evolution of one of the most successful armies in Africa.


Staging A New Community: Immigrant Yiddish Culture And Diaspora Nationalism In Interwar Paris, 1919-1940, Nicholas Lee Underwood Jan 2016

Staging A New Community: Immigrant Yiddish Culture And Diaspora Nationalism In Interwar Paris, 1919-1940, Nicholas Lee Underwood

History Graduate Theses & Dissertations

Interwar Paris was an immigrant city. By the 1930s, Paris was home to approximately two million immigrants. Around 150,000 of these were Yiddish-speaking Jews from Eastern Europe who used Paris as the basis for a new Western European-influenced Yiddishism and Diaspora Nationalism. I demonstrate how France–the supposed home of an assimilationist model of national belonging–provided fertile ground for an alternative Yiddishist and Jewish Diaspora Nationalist identity. This was an Eastern European, Jewish community ideal grafted onto a French Republican notion of belonging. Using sources ranging from Yiddish theatre and chorus documents to Yiddish-, French-, and German-language newspapers ...