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European History Commons

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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in European History

Enduring City-States: The Struggle For Power And Security In The Mediterranean Sea, Zachary B. Topkis Apr 2015

Enduring City-States: The Struggle For Power And Security In The Mediterranean Sea, Zachary B. Topkis

Senior Theses and Projects

No abstract provided.


Jacques-Louis David And The Enlightenment: The Intersection Of Art And Politics In Prerevolutionary France, Ashley B. Mullen Apr 2015

Jacques-Louis David And The Enlightenment: The Intersection Of Art And Politics In Prerevolutionary France, Ashley B. Mullen

Senior Theses and Projects

An analysis of Jacques-Louis David's art and politics before and during the French Revolution.


Les Entretiens De Fontenelle: The Rhetorical Strategies Of A Cosmological Dialogue, Mark R. Komanecky Jr. Apr 2015

Les Entretiens De Fontenelle: The Rhetorical Strategies Of A Cosmological Dialogue, Mark R. Komanecky Jr.

Senior Theses and Projects

Bernard le Bovier de Fontenelle’s Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds is one of the first major works of the French Enlightenment. First published in 1686, the work is organized as a series of dialogues between a philosopher and a marquise who discuss scientific topics such as heliocentrism and the possibility of extra-terrestrial life. Treating these subjects was a risky affair; less than a century earlier Giordano Bruno was burned at the stake, and fifty years before Fontenelle, Galileo was arrested for “holding, teaching, and defending” heliocentrism. Fontenelle employed several rhetorical and stylistic strategies in the work: he wrote ...


Ordinary Women: Female Perpetrators Of The Nazi Final Solution, Haley A. Wodenshek Apr 2015

Ordinary Women: Female Perpetrators Of The Nazi Final Solution, Haley A. Wodenshek

Senior Theses and Projects

This Thesis, by examining the roles of three Nazi women, Herta Oberheuser, Irma Grese, and Ilse Koch, as well as understanding the various women’s programs that helped to cultivate and further racism and violence against Jews and others “unworthy of life,” aims to paint a more complete picture of the true role played by Nazi women during the second world war, as well as argue that women were not only victims of the Nazi regime, nor were they solely bystanders. Rather, this thesis will demonstrate that women were not only complicit, but were also accomplices, aiding German men in ...