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Full-Text Articles in European History

Petroleum Tanker Shipping On German Inland Waterways, 1887-1994, Ingo Heidbrink Jan 2001

Petroleum Tanker Shipping On German Inland Waterways, 1887-1994, Ingo Heidbrink

History Faculty Publications

Tanker shipping today is one of the major branches of German inland navigation. Indeed, the transport of petroleum and its derivatives together comprise nearly twenty percent of total inland shipping; more than 42,000,000 tons of liquid petroleum products were shipped in 1996 by a fleet with a total cargo capacity of more than 500,000 tons.' Tanker shipping is by far the largest kind of specialist transportation on German inland waterways. But because of its very special technical requirements, a high degree of dependence on a small group of shippers, and a number of risks peculiar to this ...


David Ii, King Of Scotland (1329-1371): A Political Biography , Bruce Robert Homann Jan 2001

David Ii, King Of Scotland (1329-1371): A Political Biography , Bruce Robert Homann

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

This work examines the life and reign of David II, King of Scotland from 1329 to 1371. Whenever possible, original source material was used. Using charter and chronicle evidence, an itinerary for David II has been developed as well as an accounting of the major points of his reign. A detailed examination of David's life and activities has revealed heretofore unknown aspects of his career, including more frequent trips to Scotland, and an interpretation of his accomplishments and a brief discussion of his sudden death.


The Lithuanian-Polish Dispute And The Great Powers, 1918-1923, Peter Ernest Baltutis Jan 2001

The Lithuanian-Polish Dispute And The Great Powers, 1918-1923, Peter Ernest Baltutis

Honors Theses

In the wake of World War I, Europe was a political nightmare. Although the Armistice of 1918 effectively ended the Great War, peace in Eastern Europe was far from assured. The sudden, unexpected end of the war,combined with the growing threat of communist revolution throughout Europe created an unsettling atmosphere during the interwar period.The Great Powers-the victorious Allied forces of France, Great Britain, Italy, and the United States-met at Paris to reconstruct Europe. In particular, the Great Powers had numerous territorial questions to resolve. One of the most fascinating territorial struggles concerned the city of Vilnius (Vilna in ...


Conflict Of Rights And The Outbreak Of The First World War, Leo Katz Jan 2001

Conflict Of Rights And The Outbreak Of The First World War, Leo Katz

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.