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Full-Text Articles in European History

Schmitt, Kimberly Anne (Fa 84), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives Nov 2001

Schmitt, Kimberly Anne (Fa 84), Manuscripts & Folklife Archives

FA Finding Aids

Finding aid and full-text scan of paper (Click on “Additional Files” below) for Folklife Archives Project 84 titled “A Life History of Mania Ritter” which includes interviews conducted by Schmitt with John and Mania Ritter. Mania Ritter discusses her Russian heritage, her experiences in French boarding schools and her life in France during World War II. Includes indexes, interviews on cassette tapes, transcriptions, as well as a paper describing a portion of the interviews. The interviews have been digitized and are in the WKU Sound Archives. The transcripts

are also located in TopSCHOLAR.


Review Of The Book In The Shadow Of The Polish Eagle: The Poles, The Holocaust And Beyond, John A. Drobnicki Oct 2001

Review Of The Book In The Shadow Of The Polish Eagle: The Poles, The Holocaust And Beyond, John A. Drobnicki

Publications and Research

Review of the book In the Shadow of the Polish Eagle: The Poles, the Holocaust and Beyond.


Weapons As Weapons: Another Northern Ireland Impasse, Editor Jul 2001

Weapons As Weapons: Another Northern Ireland Impasse, Editor

International Bulletin of Political Psychology

This article explores the psychology of weapons possession in the context of political conflict in Northern Ireland.


Ms-024: Papers Of The Major General Charles A. Willoughby, Jaclyn Campbell Jul 2001

Ms-024: Papers Of The Major General Charles A. Willoughby, Jaclyn Campbell

All Finding Aids

Major General Charles Andre Willoughby was born as Adolph C. Weidenbach in Heidelberg, Germany, March 8, 1892 to Baron T. von Tscheppe-Weidenbach of Baden, Germany, and Emmy Willoughby of Baltimore, Maryland. He attended several schools in both Germany and France, learning German, French, and Spanish, before moving to the United States to be with relatives in 1910. Willoughby enlisted in the Regular Army and was a private, corporal, and sergeant between 1910 and 1913, when he entered Gettysburg College. While at Gettysburg, he founded the college’s Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC). He graduated in 1914 and received his commission ...


The Return Of Assimilation? Changing Perspectives On Immigration And Its Sequels In France, Germany, And The United States, Rogers Brubaker Jun 2001

The Return Of Assimilation? Changing Perspectives On Immigration And Its Sequels In France, Germany, And The United States, Rogers Brubaker

Rogers Brubaker

This article argues that the massive differentialist turn of the last third of the twentieth century may have reached its peak, and that one can discern signs of a modest “return of assimilation”. The article presents evidence of this from the domain of public discourse in France, public policy in Germany, and scholarly research in the US. Yet what has “returned” is not the old, analytically discredited and politically disreputable “assimilationist” understanding of assimilation, but a more analytically complex and normatively defensible understanding. The article concludes by specifying the ways in which the concept of assimilation has been transformed.


A Tale Of Two Theories: Monopolies And Craft Guilds In Medieval England And Modern Imagination, Gary Richardson May 2001

A Tale Of Two Theories: Monopolies And Craft Guilds In Medieval England And Modern Imagination, Gary Richardson

Gary Richardson

No abstract provided.


Medicine And Health Care In Later Medieval Europe: Hospitals, Public Health,, And Minority Medical Practitioners In English And German Cities, 1250-1450, Anna Terry Jan 2001

Medicine And Health Care In Later Medieval Europe: Hospitals, Public Health,, And Minority Medical Practitioners In English And German Cities, 1250-1450, Anna Terry

Inquiry: The University of Arkansas Undergraduate Research Journal

Hospitals and individual caregivers helped meet the physical and psychological needs of medieval people, just as they do today. My overall objective is to explain social and individual responses to disease within the context of Christian theology and the urban community, focusing on England and Germany in the period between 1250 and 1450. First I investigate social responses to disease, including hospitals and public health ordinances. Christianity mandated the care of the afflicted, yet physical and mental illness was associated with sin and divine punishment. Urban authorities often attempted to deal with plague outbreaks by imposing quarantines and strict regulations ...


Conflict Of Rights And The Outbreak Of The First World War, Leo Katz Jan 2001

Conflict Of Rights And The Outbreak Of The First World War, Leo Katz

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.