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Theses/Dissertations

William & Mary

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Full-Text Articles in European History

Reassessing The Neustadt As A Site Of Outstanding Cultural Value, Sophie Higgerson Apr 2019

Reassessing The Neustadt As A Site Of Outstanding Cultural Value, Sophie Higgerson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis explores the logic of preservation behind the extension of Strasbourg's World Heritage Site to include the Neustadt, a development built by the German administration between 1870 and 1916. Divided into three sections focusing on the Neustadt master plan, the Orangerie/Conseil des XV neighborhood, and the Grande Percée, the paper reframes the interchange of French and German planning practices in the late 19th and early 20th century.


"The Celebrated Madame Campan": Educating Republican Mothers À La Française In Nineteenth-Century America, Lydia Heaton Apr 2019

"The Celebrated Madame Campan": Educating Republican Mothers À La Française In Nineteenth-Century America, Lydia Heaton

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Marie Antoinette’s former lady-in-waiting and founder of an internationally acclaimed boarding school for girls, Madame Campan (1752-1822) taught both Napoleon Bonaparte’s stepdaughter and President James Monroe’s eldest daughter. She also published a popular memoir of Marie Antoinette’s life and several educational tracts. While Campan has been largely forgotten today, she is more closely connected to the development of American ideas about female education and republican motherhood than has yet been represented in the historiographical record. The French headmistress carefully crafted an educational system that proved to be influential on the development of American institutional education for ...


A Return To Camelot?: British Identity, The Masculine Ideal, And The Romanticization Of The Royal Flying Corps Image, Abby S. Whitlock Apr 2019

A Return To Camelot?: British Identity, The Masculine Ideal, And The Romanticization Of The Royal Flying Corps Image, Abby S. Whitlock

Undergraduate Honors Theses

My research focuses on the intersection between gender, social identity, and memory in the British military during the First World War. Focusing on the Royal Flying Corps, I explore how the image of the Royal Flying Corps stemmed from three primary avenues: Britain’s pre-war infatuation with aviation, the anonymous nature of industrial warfare in the trenches impacting public morale, and targeted recruitment tactics and medical examination criteria. These three avenues directly correlated with the British upper class perception of the ideal “masculine man”, whose characteristics of chivalry, obedience, courage, and emotional strength were directly projected onto RFC servicemen. Through ...


Jumping Through Hoops: The Rise And Demise Of The Hoop Petticoat In The Eighteenth Century, Charlotte Engel Apr 2019

Jumping Through Hoops: The Rise And Demise Of The Hoop Petticoat In The Eighteenth Century, Charlotte Engel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis looks at eighteenth-century hooped petticoats and society's attitudes towards them in the hope of learning more about what made these garments so popular. It examines their change over time, satirical commentary on these garments, and who was wearing them throughout society.


Linguistic Feminism & The Body In 20th-Century French Feminist Texts, Lauren Hammett Apr 2018

Linguistic Feminism & The Body In 20th-Century French Feminist Texts, Lauren Hammett

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines the use of linguistic feminism and references to the body in 20th-century French feminist texts, and particularly in the work of Luce Irigaray. This involves an investigation into the nature of French feminism and the validity of the accusations of essentialism that have been leveled against it by many critics. The thesis argues for French feminists' place in feminist scholarship and for an anti-essentialist, more figurative reading of their discussions of the body, in addition to examining their discussions of language, including écriture féminine. Finally, the implications of French feminist ideology for feminism today, as well as ...


Maritime Governance: How State Capacity Impacts Piracy And Sea Lane Security, Yuito Ishikawa Apr 2018

Maritime Governance: How State Capacity Impacts Piracy And Sea Lane Security, Yuito Ishikawa

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Maritime piracy varies from place to place and from age to age. This thesis aims to explain the variation of piracy across time and space by exploring the capability of establishing maritime governance against piracy. The spatial variation in the number of piratical attacks is explained by calculating the state capacity for governing the surrounding seas called Sea Power Index. The thesis argues that pirates particularly target waters near a state with “medium” levels of sea power because such states are not capable of enforcing strict regulations on piracy but can provide enough infrastructure and economy for pirates to have ...


Defining Ambiguous: Lesbianism And The Vampire In “Christabel” And Carmilla, Holly E. Reynolds May 2017

Defining Ambiguous: Lesbianism And The Vampire In “Christabel” And Carmilla, Holly E. Reynolds

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Within vampire fiction, there exists a common narrative of a wide-eyed, innocent victim being pursued and then corrupted by a mysterious figure. At first glance, Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "Christabel" (1816) and Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's novella Carmilla (1872) seem to adhere to this narrative. Both works feature young women, Christabel in "Christabel" and Laura in Carmilla, being pursued by vampires: specifically, female vampires. However, it can be argued that the young women in Coleridge's and Le Fanu's works are not victims; rather, they are liberated agents acting independently in their sexual lives. An analysis of ...


Scattered Prizes: Colonial Fantasies And The Material Body In The English Renaissance Blazon, Aidan J. Selmer May 2017

Scattered Prizes: Colonial Fantasies And The Material Body In The English Renaissance Blazon, Aidan J. Selmer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper attempts to draw connections between instances when English Renaissance poets use descriptive language tinged by colonial imaginings within a popular contemporary poetic device, the Petrarchan blazon. In the process, Aidan Selmer explores new ways to read selections from Edmund Spenser, Sir Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Sir Walter Ralegh, Sir John Davies, and John Donne, within the context of each poet's real and fictional roles in the early imperial and colonial projects of Early Modern England. What emerges is a thoughtful, complex conversation between several influential writers who recognize the materialistic (and misogynistic) politics inherent within the blazon ...


Theobald Wolfe Tone As A Politician And Diplomat, Abigail Clancy Trevor May 2016

Theobald Wolfe Tone As A Politician And Diplomat, Abigail Clancy Trevor

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Theobald Wolfe Tone was one of the leaders of the Irish Rebellion of 1798. He and his allies worked initially for moderate reform and later to establish Ireland as an independent republic free from English rule. Tone devoted the latter part of his career to negotiations with the French government to acquire a military force to assist in Ireland’s liberation. While the French did eventually agree, the rebellion was unsuccessful. Tone documented his life in a series of personal and public writings, which have been studied by historians since the nineteenth century. For much of this time, scholars have ...


Molded From Clay: The Portrayal Of Jews Through The Golem In Yudel Rosenberg’S The Golem And The Wondrous Deeds Of The Maharal Of Prague And Gustav Meyrink’S Der Golem, Reynolds Nelson Hahamovitch Apr 2016

Molded From Clay: The Portrayal Of Jews Through The Golem In Yudel Rosenberg’S The Golem And The Wondrous Deeds Of The Maharal Of Prague And Gustav Meyrink’S Der Golem, Reynolds Nelson Hahamovitch

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines and compares Yudel Rosenberg’s The Golem and the Wondrous Deeds of the Maharal (1909) and Gustav Meyrink’s Der Golem (1915). These texts brought monumental changes to the Golem legend and brought the creature for the first time into popular modern literature. This thesis pays particular attention to how Rosenberg and Meyrink bind the Golem legend to the portrayal of the Jew in contemporary Jewish and non-Jewish discourses. I conclude my discussion of these two novels by examining them in light of the Finis Ghetto program, an urban renewal program which almost completely destroyed Prague’s ...


Group Discipleship And Individual Spirituality: Challenging Models Of False Sanctity In Early Modern Italy And Spain, Mary Andino Apr 2016

Group Discipleship And Individual Spirituality: Challenging Models Of False Sanctity In Early Modern Italy And Spain, Mary Andino

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This honors thesis examines men and women tried by the Inquisition in Italy and Spain for the crime of false sanctity, or feigning holiness. This paper relies on these trials to explore discipleship, confession, personal spirituality, and visionary experience in early modern Europe.


Thinking Through The Monarchy In Sixth-Century Visigothic Spain, Cade Meinel Apr 2016

Thinking Through The Monarchy In Sixth-Century Visigothic Spain, Cade Meinel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper uses a comparison of the laws of the Visigothic Code to the events of the sixth century to investigate the continuity that the concepts surrounding the Visigothic monarchy, such as negotiated sovereignty and religious and ethnic identities, provided within the Visigothic kingdom in Spain. It first establishes the theoretical framework for the monarchy found in the law before exploring how these ideas influenced and were in turn affected by the events of the sixth century. It moves through the century starting with King Theodoric the Great and the Ostrogoth influence and ends with the kings Liuvigild and Recarred ...


Bouts Of Brain Fever: Female Rebellion And The Dubiety Of Illness In Victorian Fiction, Stephanie R. Mason May 2015

Bouts Of Brain Fever: Female Rebellion And The Dubiety Of Illness In Victorian Fiction, Stephanie R. Mason

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In several Victorian novels, a character becomes incapacitated—and bedridden—for a period of time due to an elusive ailment known as brain fever; these mental alterations usually occur in female characters after an unexpected event or a stress-ridden situation. However, the sources of and meanings behind these fits of brain fever are limited to generic descriptions (if the author provides any explanation at all). This apparently intentional absence of information suggests that the illnesses act as symbols, alluding to or attempting to understand relevant social issues of the time. Through an in-depth study of Elizabeth Gaskell’s Mary Barton ...


Disaster And Discourse: Reactions To The 1906 Courrières Colliery Mine Disaster, Jacob Abrams May 2015

Disaster And Discourse: Reactions To The 1906 Courrières Colliery Mine Disaster, Jacob Abrams

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The 1906 Courrières Colliery Mine Disaster is the worst industrial catastrophe ever to have occurred in Europe. Yet, there is little scholarship available on the subject. This thesis examines reactions to the disaster from French coalminers, the French government, and international groups, states, and organizations. What is revealed is the importance of the event to understanding the historical relationships between work and protest, the French state and the labor movement, and the construction of international disaster relief and motivations for charity and giving.


Taming Of Monsters: The Postdramatic Case For Copenhagen, Shaan Y. Sharma May 2015

Taming Of Monsters: The Postdramatic Case For Copenhagen, Shaan Y. Sharma

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Analysis of Michael Frayn's manipulation of perspective in his works, the implications of a postdramatic interpretation of Copenhagen, the production process of the show, and reflections on the performance.


Narrativity In French Depictions Of The Crusades, Sydney Morgan Weaver May 2015

Narrativity In French Depictions Of The Crusades, Sydney Morgan Weaver

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis studies the use of narrative, as exemplified by the theories of Hayden White, in the histories of the Crusades that have been written by French authors. It looks at three primary authors: William of Tyre, Louis Maimbourg, and J.J. Lemoine, as products of their time and authors of a history.


Of Myth And Memory: Collective Memory In The French World War Ii Museum, Elisabeth S. Bloxam May 2015

Of Myth And Memory: Collective Memory In The French World War Ii Museum, Elisabeth S. Bloxam

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines the complex mechanics of collective memory in France through a study of museums dedicated to World War II. Through a chronological analysis of museums that have emerged over the past seventy years, I endeavor to connect the evolution of the French war museum to the creation, propagation and ultimate disintegration of the ‘Resistance Myth,’ a national wartime narrative propagated by the French government in the postwar period. This study concludes with an analysis of the current status of the WWII museum as an educative and commemorative institution that presents the Resistance in a restructured though not entirely ...


Frederick's Chessboard: Domestic Institutions And The Origins Of The Seven Years' War, Caitlin Hartnett Apr 2015

Frederick's Chessboard: Domestic Institutions And The Origins Of The Seven Years' War, Caitlin Hartnett

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis explores why the states involved in the Seven Years’ War chose to go to war in 1756 by analyzing the relationship between the individual leader, domestic institutions and state action. Through a structured-focus comparison of Frederick the Great’s Prussia and Newcastle’s Britain, this thesis argues that the domestic institutional structure determines the level of influence held over state action by the individual leader and their preferences.


Historical Precedents And Early Modern Interpretations: English Histories Of America, 1500-1700, Madeline H. Grimm Apr 2015

Historical Precedents And Early Modern Interpretations: English Histories Of America, 1500-1700, Madeline H. Grimm

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, English scholars and travelers created the first English studies of the environment and inhabitants of the New World. This thesis suggests that historical interpretation formed the intellectual foundations for English colonization in America. Writers applied their knowledge of the past to questions of why to colonize America, how to know the New World, and how to understand the Native Americans. These writers struggled to construct a biblical or classical genealogy to explain how the Native Americans had arrived in the New World and the identity of their ancestors. Debates over various historical narratives for ...


Bard In The Gondola, Barred In The Ghetto: Operatic Adaptations Of Shakespearean Text And Italian Identity In The Late Nineteenth Century, Anne M. Kehrli May 2014

Bard In The Gondola, Barred In The Ghetto: Operatic Adaptations Of Shakespearean Text And Italian Identity In The Late Nineteenth Century, Anne M. Kehrli

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis, Bard in the Gondola, Barred in the Ghetto: Operatic Adaptations of Shakespearean Text and Italian Identity in the Late Nineteenth Century, is based on the comparison between two texts. The first is William Shakespeare’s first quarto edition of The Merchant of Venice. The second is the 1873 vocal score and libretto of Ciro Pinsuti and G.T. Cimino’s opera, Il Mercante di Venezia: un melodramma in quattro atti. The contrast between the two works is made within the context of Italian unification, nationalism and identity juxtaposed with the literary and philosophical trends of the nineteenth century ...


Keep Calm And Carry On?: Examining Wwii Great Britain Through The Lens Of Overseas Evacuation, Amy Schaffman Apr 2014

Keep Calm And Carry On?: Examining Wwii Great Britain Through The Lens Of Overseas Evacuation, Amy Schaffman

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In response to the threat that Hitler would try to invade Britain, British parents sought a course of action to send their children out of harm’s way either to the United States or the Commonwealth Countries. Initially, only the rich could afford to do so. This angered the lower class, engendering a government initiative known as the Children Overseas Reception Board or CORB. CORB arranged for 2,664 children to find temporary refuge in such Commonwealth countries as Canada, Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand, as well as in the United States. This program came to an abrupt halt ...


Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory Apr 2014

Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The three bronze doors of the Baptistery of San Giovanni stand as public expressions of Florence’s imperial history, economic stability, and artistic advances. These commissions can only be understood in their physical context within the Baptistery, the city’s most revered monument. The Baptistery testifies to Florence’s imperial Roman and early Christian history, and it serves vital religious and civic functions within the commune. Each bronze door guards the liminal space between the city’s public sphere and the sacred interior where the baptismal ritual is performed. The bronze medium and the narrative style of the doors further ...


Discordia In Concordia: The Two-Step Development Of The Post-Gratian Gloss And The Emergence Of A New Era In Canon Law, Zachary A. Woodward Apr 2014

Discordia In Concordia: The Two-Step Development Of The Post-Gratian Gloss And The Emergence Of A New Era In Canon Law, Zachary A. Woodward

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Around 1140, a canon lawyer named Gratian published a legal collection titled Concordia Discordantium Canonum (“A Harmony of Discordant Canons”), which attempted to compile and reconcile the Church’s often contradictory laws. Because of its cohesiveness, comprehensiveness, and directness, canonists began using the Decretum (as it became called) as a textbook and legal reference; some canonists composed glosses to aid readers of this masterpiece. I argue that the glosses on Gratian’s Decretum developed over the course of two distinct subgenres—early glosses and late glosses. While early glosses were written to provide understanding of Gratian’s original legal arguments ...


The Revolutionary Career Of Louis Philippe De SéGur: Caught Between Tradition And Reform, Lauren Wallace Jan 2013

The Revolutionary Career Of Louis Philippe De SéGur: Caught Between Tradition And Reform, Lauren Wallace

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Clockmaking Clerics And Ropemaking Lawyers: Mixing Occupational Roles In Early Modern Spain, Aaron Joshua Gregory Jan 2012

Clockmaking Clerics And Ropemaking Lawyers: Mixing Occupational Roles In Early Modern Spain, Aaron Joshua Gregory

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


For Their Maintenance And Education: An Analysis Of Children Entering Christ's Hospital, London, 1763-1803, Kaitlyn Elizabeth Gardy Jan 2011

For Their Maintenance And Education: An Analysis Of Children Entering Christ's Hospital, London, 1763-1803, Kaitlyn Elizabeth Gardy

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Comparing Terrors: State Terrorism In Revolutionary France And Russia, Anne Cabriã© Forsythe Jan 2011

Comparing Terrors: State Terrorism In Revolutionary France And Russia, Anne Cabriã© Forsythe

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


The "Extraordinary" Case Of James Allen: A Study Of Gender And Sexuality In Early Nineteenth-Century Britain, Maria Dale Booth Jan 2011

The "Extraordinary" Case Of James Allen: A Study Of Gender And Sexuality In Early Nineteenth-Century Britain, Maria Dale Booth

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.


Towns In Mind: Urban Plans, Political Culture, And Empire In The Colonial Chesapeake, 1607--1722, Paul Philip Musselwhite Jan 2011

Towns In Mind: Urban Plans, Political Culture, And Empire In The Colonial Chesapeake, 1607--1722, Paul Philip Musselwhite

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

This dissertation charts the contested political and cultural meaning of urbanization in the emerging plantation societies of Virginia and Maryland. Scholars have long asserted that Chesapeake planters' desire for lucre led them to patent huge tracts of land, disperse across the landscape, and completely dismiss urban development. However, through 17 pieces of legislation, colonists, governors, and London administrators actually encouraged towns in the Chesapeake through the seventeenth century. Despite the environmental and agricultural constraints of tidewater tobacco, both colonies wrestled with a perceived need for towns, which consistently appeared to represent the best means to engineer the region's political ...


"I Would Cut My Bones For Him": Concepts Of Loyalty, Social Change, And Culture In The Scottish Highlands, From The Clans To The American Revolution, Alana Speth Jan 2011

"I Would Cut My Bones For Him": Concepts Of Loyalty, Social Change, And Culture In The Scottish Highlands, From The Clans To The American Revolution, Alana Speth

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

No abstract provided.