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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in European History

Dynamics Of War: Culture, Society, Environment, And Pedagogy, Breanne Jacobsen Aug 2017

Dynamics Of War: Culture, Society, Environment, And Pedagogy, Breanne Jacobsen

All Graduate Plan B and other Reports

War is an ever-present feature of human civilization. Nearly all cultures and societies show accounts of human conflict. This portfolio seeks to provide both a multidimensional analysis of war and a means of instructing students to appreciate its significance as a driving force of history using three different components.

The syllabus project provides a long-term view of how the various wars and conflicts came to be and progressed in Western Civilization in the modern era.

The chapter-length paper shows the ravaging effects that war and conflict can have on a physical landscape and the environment in which the conflict takes ...


What In A Good Cause Men May Both Dare And Venture, Karen Schwarze May 2016

What In A Good Cause Men May Both Dare And Venture, Karen Schwarze

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

“What in a Good Cause Men May Both Dare and Venture” is a historical short story that features schoolteachers in Munich, Bavaria, during the revolutionary period of 1848. The principle character, Franz Schuler, must decide whether or not to join an illegal teachers union. Simultaneously, he must choose whether or not to stand up against his emotionally abusive father. King Ludwig I, Lola Montez, Karl von Abel, and the revolutionary fervor that bubbled up in several European regions, all function as part of the backdrop of this story. Paired with current struggles educators face in the United States and around ...


Religious Space In Transition: A Comparison Of Latter-Day Saint And Nonconformist Worship In Victorian England, Jaclyn Ann Beazer May 2011

Religious Space In Transition: A Comparison Of Latter-Day Saint And Nonconformist Worship In Victorian England, Jaclyn Ann Beazer

All Graduate Plan B and other Reports

July 19, 1837 was not a day to remember for the majority of the residents of Liverpool, England. For one small group of men, however, this was a day they had been anticipating for months. After a record breaking Atlantic crossing, the men hired a small boat to take them ashore rather than wait for the passenger steamer. Just before the boat reached the pier, several of the men jumped out and waded to shore, anxious to reach land and begin their work. These men were the first missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to arrive ...


Can The "Peasant" Speak? Forging Dialogues In A Nineteenth-Century Legend Collection, William Pooley Dec 2010

Can The "Peasant" Speak? Forging Dialogues In A Nineteenth-Century Legend Collection, William Pooley

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The folklore collections amassed by Jean-François Bladé in nineteenth-century southwestern France are problematic for modern readers. Bladé's legacy includes a confusing combination of poorly received historical works and unimportant short stories as well as the large collections of proverbs, songs, and narratives that he collected in his native Gascony. No writer has ever attempted to study any of Bladé's informants in detail, not even his most famous narrator, the illiterate and "defiant" Guillaume Cazaux.

Rather than dismissing Bladé as a poor ethnographer whose transcripts do not reflect what his informant Cazaux said, I propose taking Bladé's own ...


Smoldering Embers: Czech-German Cultural Competition, 1848-1948, C. Brandon Hone May 2010

Smoldering Embers: Czech-German Cultural Competition, 1848-1948, C. Brandon Hone

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

After World War II, state-sponsored deportations amounting to ethnic cleansing occurred and showed that the roots of the Czech-German cultural competition are important. In Bohemia, Czechs and Germans share a long history of contact, both mutually beneficial and antagonistic. Bohemia became one of the most important constituent realms of the Holy Roman Empire, bringing Czechs into close contact with Germans. During the reign of Václav IV, a theologian at the University of Prague named Jan Hus began to cause controversy. Hus began to preach the doctrines outlined by the Englishman John Wycliffe. At the Council of Constance church officials sought ...


Henry Viii: Supremacy, Religion, And The Anabaptists, Joel Martin Gillaspie Dec 2008

Henry Viii: Supremacy, Religion, And The Anabaptists, Joel Martin Gillaspie

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

In 1534, the English Parliament passed the Act of Supremacy. This effectively stripped all of the authority the Pope held in England and gave it to Henry VIII. Also because of the Act of Supremacy Henry VIII gained a new title: Supreme Head of the Church of England. However, there was a problem. The Act of Supremacy only vaguely defined the new powers that had been given to the King. Consequently, what exactly his new powers were and their limits had to be established. The other issue that had to be dealt with was the establishment of the canons of ...


The Glory Of Cambresis, Mark Anderson May 1992

The Glory Of Cambresis, Mark Anderson

Undergraduate Honors Capstone Projects

In the Sixteenth century, Paris dominated France as the economic, social, and political center of all that happened in the Western world. For a brief moment, at the close of the Habsburg-Valois War, a small and virtually insignificant town snatched away the center stage; the final negotiations for peace would take place in Cambresis. Each power involved in the treaty wanted to see a quick end to the war, but not at their own expense. France and Spain, the "superpowers" of the negotiations, struggled to come out on top, but while their differences appeared to take precedence over all else ...