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Undergraduate Honors Theses

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Full-Text Articles in European History

Reassessing The Neustadt As A Site Of Outstanding Cultural Value, Sophie Higgerson Apr 2019

Reassessing The Neustadt As A Site Of Outstanding Cultural Value, Sophie Higgerson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis explores the logic of preservation behind the extension of Strasbourg's World Heritage Site to include the Neustadt, a development built by the German administration between 1870 and 1916. Divided into three sections focusing on the Neustadt master plan, the Orangerie/Conseil des XV neighborhood, and the Grande Percée, the paper reframes the interchange of French and German planning practices in the late 19th and early 20th century.


"The Celebrated Madame Campan": Educating Republican Mothers À La Française In Nineteenth-Century America, Lydia Heaton Apr 2019

"The Celebrated Madame Campan": Educating Republican Mothers À La Française In Nineteenth-Century America, Lydia Heaton

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Marie Antoinette’s former lady-in-waiting and founder of an internationally acclaimed boarding school for girls, Madame Campan (1752-1822) taught both Napoleon Bonaparte’s stepdaughter and President James Monroe’s eldest daughter. She also published a popular memoir of Marie Antoinette’s life and several educational tracts. While Campan has been largely forgotten today, she is more closely connected to the development of American ideas about female education and republican motherhood than has yet been represented in the historiographical record. The French headmistress carefully crafted an educational system that proved to be influential on the development of American institutional education for ...


A Return To Camelot?: British Identity, The Masculine Ideal, And The Romanticization Of The Royal Flying Corps Image, Abby S. Whitlock Apr 2019

A Return To Camelot?: British Identity, The Masculine Ideal, And The Romanticization Of The Royal Flying Corps Image, Abby S. Whitlock

Undergraduate Honors Theses

My research focuses on the intersection between gender, social identity, and memory in the British military during the First World War. Focusing on the Royal Flying Corps, I explore how the image of the Royal Flying Corps stemmed from three primary avenues: Britain’s pre-war infatuation with aviation, the anonymous nature of industrial warfare in the trenches impacting public morale, and targeted recruitment tactics and medical examination criteria. These three avenues directly correlated with the British upper class perception of the ideal “masculine man”, whose characteristics of chivalry, obedience, courage, and emotional strength were directly projected onto RFC servicemen. Through ...


Jumping Through Hoops: The Rise And Demise Of The Hoop Petticoat In The Eighteenth Century, Charlotte Engel Apr 2019

Jumping Through Hoops: The Rise And Demise Of The Hoop Petticoat In The Eighteenth Century, Charlotte Engel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis looks at eighteenth-century hooped petticoats and society's attitudes towards them in the hope of learning more about what made these garments so popular. It examines their change over time, satirical commentary on these garments, and who was wearing them throughout society.


Integration In The European Union: Does Widening Make Deepening?, Angelica Smyrnios Jan 2019

Integration In The European Union: Does Widening Make Deepening?, Angelica Smyrnios

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Integration of the European Union over the years has continued to be debated, with many theories attempting to explain how the Union has consistently become ever closer. While many theories focus on the role of the individual member states or, on the other hand, the role of the Union’s institutions in driving forward integration, fewer consider the impact of widening, which entails adding more countries to the EU through enlargements. Since the first enlargement in 1973, the EU has grown from six members to its current twenty-eight. Meanwhile, it has transformed from a small community with specific economic purposes ...


Over Her Dead Body: The Subversion Of Feminine Beauty In La Scapigliatura, Serafina Paladino Jan 2019

Over Her Dead Body: The Subversion Of Feminine Beauty In La Scapigliatura, Serafina Paladino

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Within the canon of Italian literature, there is but a small pool of research on the archetypical avant-garde movement of La Scapigliatura, especially in how this circle of unique circle of artists especially their authors and poets, depicted female characters within their works. In fact, there is a dominating view that the portrayal of women presented by the Scapigliati in their works is incredibly misogynistic in nature and was inspired by the “fear of women” that was commonly felt by male artists in the mid 1800’s. However, this undergraduate thesis attempts to uncover the true nature of the women ...


The American Gluten Craze: Its Origins, Persistence, And Impacts On The Safety Of Gluten-Free Boulder Restaurant Foods, Isabel Trede Jan 2019

The American Gluten Craze: Its Origins, Persistence, And Impacts On The Safety Of Gluten-Free Boulder Restaurant Foods, Isabel Trede

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Gluten, a complex mixture of hundreds of related but distinct proteins found in wheat, barley, rye, and triticale, can be dangerous if consumed by individuals with gluten-related disorders. I define the Gluten Craze as the widespread public fascination with the gluten-free diet as it is advertised in the media and in technology-based sources of information. The purpose of this research is to examine the origins, persistence, and impacts of the Gluten Craze in the U.S. and to understand the impacts of the craze in Boulder, Colorado through the tested safety of gluten-free restaurant foods.

The research included in this ...


Buried Before, Devan Herbert Jan 2019

Buried Before, Devan Herbert

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Buried Before is a twelve-minute concert dance work which was performed February 7-10, 2019, in the Charlotte York Irey Theatre by Sasha Alcott, Sara Varra, Olivia Hodnett, and Adia Banks. This essay is a roadmap to understanding the piece as well as the research process that accompanied it. The piece challenges the way war stories are told, particularly the themes of glorification, masculinity, and heroism. It centralizes the body in the telling of women’s war stories which provides a level of complexity and abstraction which are not present in linear, traditional war narratives. Throughout both the essay and the ...


From Fallen Women To Founding Mothers: How Petty Criminals Became Pioneers On The Australian Frontier 1788-1828, Katherine Spencer May 2018

From Fallen Women To Founding Mothers: How Petty Criminals Became Pioneers On The Australian Frontier 1788-1828, Katherine Spencer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Historians have often portrayed female convicts transported to the Australian colonies as victims of circumstance, exploited by Britain's outdated legal system, colonial authorities, and even their male counterparts. This research paper will seek to move away from the victimhood narrative that plagues the historical record of convict women and instead analyze female convict agency. Contrary to the current research on the subject, convict women in the Australian penal colonies had agency to improve their lives given their unique circumstances. Despite poor conditions, discrimination, and their image as unredeemable “fallen women” among English society, convict women were resourceful, resilient, and ...


Maritime Governance: How State Capacity Impacts Piracy And Sea Lane Security, Yuito Ishikawa Apr 2018

Maritime Governance: How State Capacity Impacts Piracy And Sea Lane Security, Yuito Ishikawa

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Maritime piracy varies from place to place and from age to age. This thesis aims to explain the variation of piracy across time and space by exploring the capability of establishing maritime governance against piracy. The spatial variation in the number of piratical attacks is explained by calculating the state capacity for governing the surrounding seas called Sea Power Index. The thesis argues that pirates particularly target waters near a state with “medium” levels of sea power because such states are not capable of enforcing strict regulations on piracy but can provide enough infrastructure and economy for pirates to have ...


Linguistic Feminism & The Body In 20th-Century French Feminist Texts, Lauren Hammett Apr 2018

Linguistic Feminism & The Body In 20th-Century French Feminist Texts, Lauren Hammett

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines the use of linguistic feminism and references to the body in 20th-century French feminist texts, and particularly in the work of Luce Irigaray. This involves an investigation into the nature of French feminism and the validity of the accusations of essentialism that have been leveled against it by many critics. The thesis argues for French feminists' place in feminist scholarship and for an anti-essentialist, more figurative reading of their discussions of the body, in addition to examining their discussions of language, including écriture féminine. Finally, the implications of French feminist ideology for feminism today, as well as ...


“Beauty Fled, And Empire Now No More” Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’S Transimperial Femininity In The Turkish Embassy Letters (1716-1718), Rachael Gessert Jan 2018

“Beauty Fled, And Empire Now No More” Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’S Transimperial Femininity In The Turkish Embassy Letters (1716-1718), Rachael Gessert

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Mary Wortley Montagu’s Turkish Embassy Letters contain commentary on feminine beauty within an orientalist context, which reflects transimperial networks of contact and communication during the early modern period. Lady Mary was uniquely situated at the nexus of empire, with privileged access to both the public political and privately feminine spaces of the British, Austro-Hungarian, and Ottoman empires. Her literary accounts of feminine beauty and the broader theme of Orientalism reflect the European geopolitical situation and the bigger question of transimperial systems of exchange that shaped modern Europe. In narrating the women of the Ottoman court, Montagu’s literary account ...


To A Millennial Kingdom: The Nazi Aryanization Of Christianity, Daniel Lucca Jan 2018

To A Millennial Kingdom: The Nazi Aryanization Of Christianity, Daniel Lucca

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper argues during the Third Reich, an Aryanization of Christianity took place, one that emerged into a distinct Nazi theology which emphasized the implementation of “Germanic customs” in place of the perceived Jewish aspects into religion and religious holidays, most notably in Christmas. This replacement of perceived Jewish aspects of Christianity was part of a larger millennial attempt to create the Nazis' ideal thousand-year empire. In examining how the Nazis did so, this paper will begin with an analysis of the relationship between the DC religious movement and the Nazis in the first years of the Third Reich. I ...


Impossible Parties: An Exploration Of The Convergence Of Life And Art As A Romantic Theory Of The Party, Amina Otto Jan 2018

Impossible Parties: An Exploration Of The Convergence Of Life And Art As A Romantic Theory Of The Party, Amina Otto

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The nature of the interaction between life and art has been a point of dispute in the field of Humanities for centuries, and we have failed to reach a consensus on which one imitates or informs the other. During the Romantic era, it was particularly difficult to separate the two, especially when considering some of the parties, balls, and fêtes that took place in that time. Romantic novelist Georges Sand provides a Romantic theory of the party as a work of art in her novel Lélia, and provides criteria that the ideal ball must meet in order to be successful ...


Herat: The Key To India, The Individual Fears And Plans That Shaped The Defense Of India During The Great Game, Trevor L. Borasio Jan 2018

Herat: The Key To India, The Individual Fears And Plans That Shaped The Defense Of India During The Great Game, Trevor L. Borasio

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Herat was exalted as the key to India’s defense during the nineteenth century. This small city in the Khorasan region of contemporary Afghanistan was obsessed over by British politicians, explorers, agents, and authors, yet no secondary source has sought to explain why British advocates attributed importance to the city. This thesis argues that Herat was important to British men on the ground in Central Asia who feared that oncoming Russian and Persian expansionism would threaten India. Initially, British interest in the northwest frontier of India grew out a need to protect what they perceived to be the only vulnerable ...


From The Rhineland To Czechoslovakia: How The Policies Of Appeasement In The British Government Led To The Second World War, Tyler Berger Jan 2018

From The Rhineland To Czechoslovakia: How The Policies Of Appeasement In The British Government Led To The Second World War, Tyler Berger

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis's goal is to better explain how the appeasement policies of the British government between 1936 and 1939 brought about the Second World War. This thesis looks at the British government's response to the remilitarization of the Rhineland by Germany in 1936, the Anschluss, the Munich Conference, and the German invasion of Czechoslovakia.


Elizabeth's Silver Age, Ryan Smith Jan 2018

Elizabeth's Silver Age, Ryan Smith

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper asks if privateering and piracy were the source of the silver bullion coined at the English mint between 1558-1601. Production at the English mint boomed after the accession of Elizabeth I and continued throughout her reign. This expansion in the Elizabethan money supply had far-reaching consequences for the Elizabethan economy as well as the regime. Many contemporaries and many historians since have credited the Elizabethan privateers for supplying the English mint with Spanish plunder. In fact, the true picture seems more complicated, as production boomed for twenty years before a plausible case can be made for privateering driving ...


Scattered Prizes: Colonial Fantasies And The Material Body In The English Renaissance Blazon, Aidan J. Selmer May 2017

Scattered Prizes: Colonial Fantasies And The Material Body In The English Renaissance Blazon, Aidan J. Selmer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper attempts to draw connections between instances when English Renaissance poets use descriptive language tinged by colonial imaginings within a popular contemporary poetic device, the Petrarchan blazon. In the process, Aidan Selmer explores new ways to read selections from Edmund Spenser, Sir Philip Sidney, William Shakespeare, Sir Walter Ralegh, Sir John Davies, and John Donne, within the context of each poet's real and fictional roles in the early imperial and colonial projects of Early Modern England. What emerges is a thoughtful, complex conversation between several influential writers who recognize the materialistic (and misogynistic) politics inherent within the blazon ...


Defining Ambiguous: Lesbianism And The Vampire In “Christabel” And Carmilla, Holly E. Reynolds May 2017

Defining Ambiguous: Lesbianism And The Vampire In “Christabel” And Carmilla, Holly E. Reynolds

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Within vampire fiction, there exists a common narrative of a wide-eyed, innocent victim being pursued and then corrupted by a mysterious figure. At first glance, Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem "Christabel" (1816) and Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's novella Carmilla (1872) seem to adhere to this narrative. Both works feature young women, Christabel in "Christabel" and Laura in Carmilla, being pursued by vampires: specifically, female vampires. However, it can be argued that the young women in Coleridge's and Le Fanu's works are not victims; rather, they are liberated agents acting independently in their sexual lives. An analysis of ...


Anne Boleyn: Living A Thousand Lives Forever, Amanda S. Nicholson May 2017

Anne Boleyn: Living A Thousand Lives Forever, Amanda S. Nicholson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Writers and historians from earlier centuries imagined Anne Boleyn as a villain; a forward and evil woman intent on destroying Henry VII and his image. Modern accounts have been more accommodating, offering that she was misunderstood due to the constraints of the times. In an attempt to discover the historical Anne, I will be comparing and contrasting how she has been perceived in fiction and non-fiction literature, and will examine how the perception of Anne has shifted through time.


Settling The Wandering Kingdom: The Establishment Of The Visigothic Kingship Under Ataulf, Drakeford Kennon Jan 2017

Settling The Wandering Kingdom: The Establishment Of The Visigothic Kingship Under Ataulf, Drakeford Kennon

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this thesis, I argue that Alaric was not the first king of the Visigoths, at least not in the way in which scholars traditionally have envisaged him as being. This title of first king, I argue, belongs instead to Ataulf who was the one to settle the Visigoths in Hispania and pass on a style of rule that was not based on purely military might. Alaric certainly had a decisive role to play in the formation of the incipient Visigothic kingdom but his role had more to do with laying the groundwork for the development within Visigothic society for ...


"Ce Jour Immortel": The Storming Of The Bastille And The Formation Of Cultural Memory, 1789–1794, Joanna Hope Toohey Jan 2017

"Ce Jour Immortel": The Storming Of The Bastille And The Formation Of Cultural Memory, 1789–1794, Joanna Hope Toohey

Undergraduate Honors Theses

On 14 July 1789, a Parisian crowd stormed the Bastille prison in an act of popular violence that is now remembered as one of the most significant events of the French Revolution. During the ensuing five years, the French national memory of the storming of the Bastille was interpreted, guided, and contested by each dominating faction of the Revolution, and gradually came to manifest the central ideals and ironies of the Revolution itself. However, in the historiography of the French Revolution, the formation of this cultural memory has been strangely overlooked. This thesis seeks to fill the gap in the ...


Overstating And Misjudging The Prospects Of Civil War: The Ulster Volunteer Force And The Irish Volunteers In The Home Rule Crisis, 1912-1914, Julia Birgen Jan 2017

Overstating And Misjudging The Prospects Of Civil War: The Ulster Volunteer Force And The Irish Volunteers In The Home Rule Crisis, 1912-1914, Julia Birgen

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In 1914, as Europe marched towards war, the British government focused on internal issues in Ireland. The Government of Ireland Act 1914 passed the House of Commons and would have allowed for a limited power parliament in Dublin to control Irish issues. Militia’s formed in Ireland in reaction to the bill. The Irish Volunteers, in favor of the bill, swore to uphold the law, while the Ulster Volunteer Force vowed to stop the law at any cost. The British government feared both of these paramilitaries. This thesis explores the threat posed by these militias and their effects on Britain ...


A National Flag?: King James I And The British Flag, James Stokes Jan 2017

A National Flag?: King James I And The British Flag, James Stokes

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper asserts that the Union Flag was not a national flag but a heraldic device of James I. The Union Flag represented James I and his experiment in union, and not a British nation. The Union Flag was not a national flag in 1606, but a new version of the royal arms. At this time, Britain was simply the creation of heritage and the politics that surrounded it. King James I was for all intents and purposes Britain.


Demographic Engineering: Post-War Canadian Immigration Advertising And Scottish Migration, 1919-1929, Kira Johnson Jan 2017

Demographic Engineering: Post-War Canadian Immigration Advertising And Scottish Migration, 1919-1929, Kira Johnson

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In 1924 Norman MacKenzie, a Scottish World War I naval veteran, decided with his wife Annie MacKenzie to move their young family to Saskatchewan farmland in Canada. They boarded the famous Metagma ship sailing from Stornoway, on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland, for a new life in the Canadian prairies. My great-grandparents’ and grandmother’s story is not uncommon. This was a familiar movement for many Scottish Highlanders and Islanders in the 20th century. Additionally, this post-war emigration from Scotland was certainly not an isolated incident. Scotland has experienced mass emigration, particularly from the ...


The Ecocritical Carnivalesque Of Mason & Dixon: Thomas Pynchon's Environmental Vision, Theodor Jack Hamstra Jan 2017

The Ecocritical Carnivalesque Of Mason & Dixon: Thomas Pynchon's Environmental Vision, Theodor Jack Hamstra

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Among American novelists since 1945, Thomas Pynchon ranks as one of the most accomplished, with arguably the most fully realized and profound visions of Postmodernity. Therefore, his absence from the field of Ecocriticism is alarming. The aim of my thesis is to demonstrate that Pynchon’s 1997 novel Mason & Dixon ought to be considered as an essential text of American environmental writing. My thesis triangulates the environmental vision of Mason & Dixon by highlighting its affinity with environmental literature on three overlapping levels: the specter of the ancient, the spectacle of the new during the Enlightenment setting of the novel, and ...


Recreating Richard Iii: The Power Of Tudor Propaganda, Heather Alexander May 2016

Recreating Richard Iii: The Power Of Tudor Propaganda, Heather Alexander

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Because it signified the violent transition from the Plantagenet to Tudor dynasty, the death of King Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth’s Field was a monumental event. After five centuries, his skeleton was rediscovered by an archaeological team at a site, formerly the location of the Greyfriars Priory Church. The presentation uses the forensic evidence to examine the extent to which the perceived image of Richard III is the result of Tudor propaganda.


Theobald Wolfe Tone As A Politician And Diplomat, Abigail Clancy Trevor May 2016

Theobald Wolfe Tone As A Politician And Diplomat, Abigail Clancy Trevor

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Theobald Wolfe Tone was one of the leaders of the Irish Rebellion of 1798. He and his allies worked initially for moderate reform and later to establish Ireland as an independent republic free from English rule. Tone devoted the latter part of his career to negotiations with the French government to acquire a military force to assist in Ireland’s liberation. While the French did eventually agree, the rebellion was unsuccessful. Tone documented his life in a series of personal and public writings, which have been studied by historians since the nineteenth century. For much of this time, scholars have ...


Thinking Through The Monarchy In Sixth-Century Visigothic Spain, Cade Meinel Apr 2016

Thinking Through The Monarchy In Sixth-Century Visigothic Spain, Cade Meinel

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper uses a comparison of the laws of the Visigothic Code to the events of the sixth century to investigate the continuity that the concepts surrounding the Visigothic monarchy, such as negotiated sovereignty and religious and ethnic identities, provided within the Visigothic kingdom in Spain. It first establishes the theoretical framework for the monarchy found in the law before exploring how these ideas influenced and were in turn affected by the events of the sixth century. It moves through the century starting with King Theodoric the Great and the Ostrogoth influence and ends with the kings Liuvigild and Recarred ...


Molded From Clay: The Portrayal Of Jews Through The Golem In Yudel Rosenberg’S The Golem And The Wondrous Deeds Of The Maharal Of Prague And Gustav Meyrink’S Der Golem, Reynolds Nelson Hahamovitch Apr 2016

Molded From Clay: The Portrayal Of Jews Through The Golem In Yudel Rosenberg’S The Golem And The Wondrous Deeds Of The Maharal Of Prague And Gustav Meyrink’S Der Golem, Reynolds Nelson Hahamovitch

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines and compares Yudel Rosenberg’s The Golem and the Wondrous Deeds of the Maharal (1909) and Gustav Meyrink’s Der Golem (1915). These texts brought monumental changes to the Golem legend and brought the creature for the first time into popular modern literature. This thesis pays particular attention to how Rosenberg and Meyrink bind the Golem legend to the portrayal of the Jew in contemporary Jewish and non-Jewish discourses. I conclude my discussion of these two novels by examining them in light of the Finis Ghetto program, an urban renewal program which almost completely destroyed Prague’s ...