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Full-Text Articles in European History

Seventeenth-Century Perceptions Of The Henrician Reformation In Print Culture, Clare W. Smith Apr 2013

Seventeenth-Century Perceptions Of The Henrician Reformation In Print Culture, Clare W. Smith

Student Honors Theses

In 1533, Henry VIII’s desire for a male heir led to a break with Rome, and the establishment of a Church of England. The changes in the 1630s, not merely replacing the pope with the English monarch as head of the Church, but also distributing the Bible in English of the Monasteries, became known as the Henrician Reformation. Henry calmed down the pace of reform during the last phase of his reign from 1539. Many of the evangelicals he had once supported were now being persecuted, and the Church of England was returning to many Catholic practices. Yet, Henry ...


Caracalla's Armenia, Lee Patterson Jan 2013

Caracalla's Armenia, Lee Patterson

Faculty Research & Creative Activity

We are hard pressed to understand the events of Caracalla's Parthian war, including the role Armenia played in the conflict, because of gross inadequacies in our sources. A careful analysis suggests that Caracalla intended to annex Armenia but never saw the project through. His intentions can be gauged by his treatment of Edessa, for whose annexation the evidence is more solid. Caracalla was trying to secure his rear, from Osrhoene to Armenia, in preparation for a full-scale Parthian war. Because the goal of stabilizing Armenia proved elusive, given local hostilities, Caracalla had to scale back his plans.


Caracalla's Armenia, Lee E. Patterson Jan 2013

Caracalla's Armenia, Lee E. Patterson

Faculty Research & Creative Activity

We are hard pressed to understand the events of Caracalla's Parthian war, including the role Armenia played in the conflict, because of gross inadequacies in our sources. A careful analysis suggests that Caracalla intended to annex Armenia but never saw the project through. His intentions can be gauged by his treatment of Edessa, for whose annexation the evidence is more solid. Caracalla was trying to secure his rear, from Osrhoene to Armenia, in preparation for a full-scale Parthian war. Because the goal of stabilizing Armenia proved elusive, given local hostilities, Caracalla had to scale back his plans.