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Articles 61 - 90 of 151

Full-Text Articles in European History

Bouts Of Brain Fever: Female Rebellion And The Dubiety Of Illness In Victorian Fiction, Stephanie R. Mason May 2015

Bouts Of Brain Fever: Female Rebellion And The Dubiety Of Illness In Victorian Fiction, Stephanie R. Mason

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In several Victorian novels, a character becomes incapacitated—and bedridden—for a period of time due to an elusive ailment known as brain fever; these mental alterations usually occur in female characters after an unexpected event or a stress-ridden situation. However, the sources of and meanings behind these fits of brain fever are limited to generic descriptions (if the author provides any explanation at all). This apparently intentional absence of information suggests that the illnesses act as symbols, alluding to or attempting to understand relevant social issues of the time. Through an in-depth study of Elizabeth Gaskell’s Mary Barton ...


The Anti-Crusade Voice Of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Malek Jamal Zuraikat May 2015

The Anti-Crusade Voice Of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Malek Jamal Zuraikat

Theses and Dissertations

This study reads some Middle English poetry in terms of crusading, and it argues that the most prominent English poets, namely Geoffrey Chaucer, William Langland, and John Gower, were against the later crusades regardless of their target. However, since the anti-crusade voice of Gower and Langland has been discussed by many other scholars, this study focuses on Chaucer's poems and their implicit opposition of crusading. I argue that despite Chaucer's apparent neutrality to crusading as well as other sociopolitical and cultural matters of England, his poetry can hardly be read but as an indirect critique of war in ...


English National Identity In English Colonial And Imperial Literature And Undergraduate Publication Research, Megan A. Medeiros May 2015

English National Identity In English Colonial And Imperial Literature And Undergraduate Publication Research, Megan A. Medeiros

Senior Honors Projects

This project is divided into two parts. The purpose of the first part was to construct, research and write a substantial historical thesis paper on a topic relevant to nationalism and national identity in Modern European history. The purpose of the second part was to research and explore the process of publishing a historical paper in an academic journal.

In reference to the first part of the project, the thesis paper concerns English national identity as represented by several renowned and well-read English authors in their works of literature. In doing so, the paper considers the characteristics, norms, and structures ...


‘I Am Not Your Justification For Existence:’ Mourning, Fascism, Feminism And The Amputation Of Mothers And Daughters In Atwood, Ziervogel, And Ozick, Mitchell C. Hobza Apr 2015

‘I Am Not Your Justification For Existence:’ Mourning, Fascism, Feminism And The Amputation Of Mothers And Daughters In Atwood, Ziervogel, And Ozick, Mitchell C. Hobza

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

This thesis examines the complexities of mother-daughter relationships in twentieth-century women’s literature that includes themes about fascism and totalitarianism. Of central concern is how mothers and daughters are separated, both physically and psychically, in Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Meike Ziervogel’s Magda and Cynthia Ozick’s The Shawl. Adrienne Rich’s Of Woman Born provides the theoretical framework for considering maternity and the institution of motherhood. These separations occur through two modes: physical separation by political force; and psychical separation through ideological difference and what Rich terms as “Matrophobia.” The physical separation is analyzed through a ...


Coelum Britannicum: Inigo Jones And Symbolic Geometry, Rumiko Handa Jan 2015

Coelum Britannicum: Inigo Jones And Symbolic Geometry, Rumiko Handa

Architecture Program: Faculty Scholarly and Creative Activity

Inigo Jones’s interpretation that Stonehenge was a Roman temple of Coelum, the god of the heavens, was published in 1655, 3 years after his death, in The most notable Antiquity of Great Britain, vulgarly called Stone-Heng, on Salisbury Plain, Restored.1 King James I demanded an interpretation in 1620. The task most reasonably fell in the realm of Surveyor of the King’s Works, which Jones had been for the preceding 5 years. According to John Webb, Jones’s assistant since 1628 and executor of Jones’s will, it was Webb who wrote the book based on Jones’s ...


The Worldmakers: Global Imagining In Early Modern Europe, Ayesha Ramachandran Dec 2014

The Worldmakers: Global Imagining In Early Modern Europe, Ayesha Ramachandran

Ayesha Ramachandran

In this beautifully conceived book, Ayesha Ramachandran reconstructs the imaginative struggles of early modern artists, philosophers, and writers to make sense of something that we take for granted: the world, imagined as a whole. Once a new, exciting, and frightening concept, “the world” was transformed in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. But how could one envision something that no one had ever seen in its totality? The Worldmakers moves beyond histories of globalization to explore how “the world” itself—variously understood as an object of inquiry, a comprehensive category, and a system of order—was self-consciously shaped by human agents ...


Student-Centered, Interactive Teaching Of The Anglo-Saxon Cult Of The Cross, Christopher R. Fee Oct 2014

Student-Centered, Interactive Teaching Of The Anglo-Saxon Cult Of The Cross, Christopher R. Fee

English Faculty Publications

Although most Anglo-Saxonists deal with Old English texts and contexts as a matter of course in our research agendas, many of us teach relatively few specialized courses focused on our areas of expertise to highly-trained students; thus, many Old English texts and objects which are commonplace in our research lives can seem arcane and esoteric to a great many of our students. This article proposes to confront this gap, to suggest some ways of teaching a few potentially obscure texts and artifacts to undergrads, to offer some guidance about uses of technology in this endeavor, and to help fellow teachers ...


The Dutch Black Legend, Carmen Nocentelli Aug 2014

The Dutch Black Legend, Carmen Nocentelli

Carmen Nocentelli

English “Hollandophobia” is usually understood as a function or reflection of the rivalries that characterized Anglo-Dutch relations during the seventeenth century. Working against such a circumscribed understanding, this essay contends that Hollandophobia is best thought of as a “Dutch Black Legend”—that is, as a deliberate repetition of the Hispanophobic topoi known as the Spanish Black Legend. Only by acknowledging the intimate relationship between these two phenomena can we make sense of Hollandophobia’s peculiar features while discerning how this discourse helped construct what the English took to be proper Europeanness.


Animals And War: Studies Of Europe And North America Edited By Ryan Hediger, Rebecca Raglon Aug 2014

Animals And War: Studies Of Europe And North America Edited By Ryan Hediger, Rebecca Raglon

The Goose

Review of Animals and War: Studies of Europe and North America, edited by Ryan Hediger.


Scientism, Satire, And Sacrificial Ceremony In Dostoevsky's "Notes From Underground" And C.S. Lewis's "That Hideous Strength", Jonathan Smalt May 2014

Scientism, Satire, And Sacrificial Ceremony In Dostoevsky's "Notes From Underground" And C.S. Lewis's "That Hideous Strength", Jonathan Smalt

Masters Theses

Though the nineteenth-century Victorian belief that science alone could provide utopia for man weakened in the epistemological uncertainty of the postmodern era, this belief still continues today. In order to understand our current scientific milieu--and the dangers of propagating scientism--we must first trace the rise of scientism in the nineteenth-century. Though removed, Fyodor Dostoevsky, in Notes From Underground (1864), and C.S. Lewis, in That Hideous Strength (1965), are united in their critiques of scientism as a conceptual framework for human residency. For Dostoevsky, the Crystal Palace of London's Great Exhibition (1862) embodied the nineteenth-century goal to found utopia ...


A Love That Lasts: Jane Austen’S Argument For A Marriage Based On Love In Pride And Prejudice, Katlin A. Berry Apr 2014

A Love That Lasts: Jane Austen’S Argument For A Marriage Based On Love In Pride And Prejudice, Katlin A. Berry

Senior Honors Theses

During the period of Regency England, a woman’s life was planned for her before she was born, and her place in society was defined by her marital status. Before she was married, she was her father’s daughter with a slim possibility of inheriting property. After she was married, legally she did not exist; she was subsumed into her husband with absolutely no legal, political, or financial rights. She was someone’s wife; that is, if she was fortunate enough to marry because spinsters had very few opportunities to earn enough money to live on alone. Therefore, it was ...


Imperial Impulses: The Influence Of War And Death On The Writings Of Rudyard Kipling, Dylan J. Sirois Apr 2014

Imperial Impulses: The Influence Of War And Death On The Writings Of Rudyard Kipling, Dylan J. Sirois

Honors College

This historical inquiry will focus on Rudyard Kipling's life, his works, and their relationship to British Imperialism. More specifically it will demonstrate how Kipling's attitude changed after World War One through his works. To understand Kipling and his place in the British Empire it is essential to understand the framework of imperialism at the time. Once an understanding of imperialism is formed it is possible to get to know Kipling and the world he grew into. The circumstances of Kipling's upbringing were undoubtably what drove him into his passion for empire, while his later experiences were what ...


Victorian Domesticity And The Perpetuation Of Childhood: An Examination Of Gender Roles And The Family Unit In J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, Abigail Nusbaum Apr 2014

Victorian Domesticity And The Perpetuation Of Childhood: An Examination Of Gender Roles And The Family Unit In J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan, Abigail Nusbaum

Masters Theses

This work examines JM Barrie's Peter Pan in light of its cultural context. It works to show how the Victorian ideology of the separate spheres narrowed the scope of roles for men and women within the home, which ultimately led to an obsession with childhood that manifested itself strongly in the works of the children of the Victorians, the Edwardians. A study of the Victorian society in which Barrie grew up and first imagined Peter Pan, accompanied by a close reading of the text, reveals Barrie using the various characters' interactions with the title character as cultural artifacts that ...


Book Review: The Most Tenacious Of Minorities: The Jews Of Italy, David B. Levy Jan 2014

Book Review: The Most Tenacious Of Minorities: The Jews Of Italy, David B. Levy

Touro College Libraries Publications and Research

The author reviews the book The Most Tenacious of Minorities: The Jews of Italy.


The Call Of The Sidhe: Poetic And Mythological Influences In Ireland's Struggle For Freedom, Anna Wakeling Jan 2014

The Call Of The Sidhe: Poetic And Mythological Influences In Ireland's Struggle For Freedom, Anna Wakeling

Honors Theses

The mythology of Ireland is millennia old, birthing a poetic tradition that has endured with the nation. This presentation explores how important Ireland's mythological heritage has been to its people, sustaining their fighting spirit during foreign invasions, political instability, and conflicts with England. The work if William Butler Yeats, in particular, embodies the struggles between the Protestant Ascendancy and the native Irish; Christianity and paganism; the Gaelic poetic tradition and newer English literature; and the push for peaceful independence negotiation versus the radical revolutionary movements inspired by ancient heroes. His life and poetry serve as a lens that brings ...


A Foray Into Library Digital Publishing: The British Virginia Project At Virginia Commonwealth University, Kevin Farley Jan 2014

A Foray Into Library Digital Publishing: The British Virginia Project At Virginia Commonwealth University, Kevin Farley

VCU Libraries Faculty and Staff Publications

The British Virginia project involves a collaboration between Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Libraries and faculty members in the departments of English and History at VCU, with the project led by Dr. Joshua Eckhardt (English). As of April 25, 2013, the project has published its first title: an online edition of a sermon preached to the Virginia Company by William Symonds. To ensure the success of this project, a number of details required careful planning, including library outreach, IT involvement, and digital publishing protocols. Our example has deepened a move toward a dynamic and creative digital environment for researchers across campus ...


A Position Embedded In Identity: Subalternity In Neoliberal Globalization, Sonita Sarker Dec 2013

A Position Embedded In Identity: Subalternity In Neoliberal Globalization, Sonita Sarker

Sonita Sarker

No abstract provided.


F.F. Bruce: A Life, By Tim Grass, Craighton T. Hippenhammer Dec 2013

F.F. Bruce: A Life, By Tim Grass, Craighton T. Hippenhammer

Faculty Scholarship – Library Science

Frederick Fyvie Bruce (1910-1990) was one of the most influential evangelical biblical scholars of the last half of the Twentieth Century within the UK and the United States at a time when highly respected evangelical academics were rare and almost non-existent. Over his lifetime he wrote over two thousand articles and reviews plus four dozen books, mostly about the Bible, biblical commentary and interpretation, and classical language translation. His approach was nonsectarian and inclusive, from the standpoint of insightful biblical translation rather than systematized theology. This biography is a fully realized, in-depth treatment, covering both Bruce’s academic career and ...


The Politics Media Equation:Exposing Two Faces Of Old Nexus Through Study Of General Elections,Wikileaks And Radia Tapes, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr Oct 2013

The Politics Media Equation:Exposing Two Faces Of Old Nexus Through Study Of General Elections,Wikileaks And Radia Tapes, Ratnesh Dwivedi Mr

Ratnesh Dwivedi

The important identity of a responsible media is playing an unbiased role in reporting a matter without giving unnecessary hype to attract the attention of the gullible public with the object of making money and money only.After reporting properly the media can educate the public to form their own opinion in the matters of public interest. Throughout the centuries, the world has never existed without information and communication, hence the inexhaustible essence of mass media. The government has the power to either make or reject whatever that will exist within its environment. It also determines how free the mass ...


Review Of The Young Leonardo: Art And Life In Fifteenth-Century Florence By Larry J. Feinberg, Brian Maxson Jun 2013

Review Of The Young Leonardo: Art And Life In Fifteenth-Century Florence By Larry J. Feinberg, Brian Maxson

Brian J. Maxson

No abstract provided.


Who We Are: Incarcerated Students And The New Prison Literature, 1995-2010, Reilly Hannah N. Lorastein May 2013

Who We Are: Incarcerated Students And The New Prison Literature, 1995-2010, Reilly Hannah N. Lorastein

Honors Projects

This project focuses on American prison writings from the late 1990s to the 2000s. Much has been written about American prison intellectuals such as Malcolm X, George Jackson, Eldridge Cleaver, and Angela Davis, who wrote as active participants in black and brown freedom movements in the United States. However the new prison literature that has emerged over the past two decades through higher education programs within prisons has received little to no attention. This study provides a more nuanced view of the steadily growing silent population in the United States through close readings of Openline, an inter-disciplinary journal featuring poetry ...


Putting Down Roots: A Tolkienian Conception Of Place, Kayla Snow May 2013

Putting Down Roots: A Tolkienian Conception Of Place, Kayla Snow

Masters Theses

This thesis explores the way in which J.R.R. Tolkien's develops and expresses his nuanced sense of place through his major literary works--namely, The Silmarillion, The Hobbit, and The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Tolkien's sense of place, as expressed through his fiction, encompasses both metaphysical and geographical relational structures that are operative at both the local and global levels. As Tolkien develops his sense of place in his fiction, he draws from the Distributist principles--largely informed by Catholic social policy of the late nineteenth century and popularized by G.K. Chesterton--to build the economy in Middle-earth ...


Teaching The Northern Ireland Troubles Through History And Literature, Sarah Anne Jensen Apr 2013

Teaching The Northern Ireland Troubles Through History And Literature, Sarah Anne Jensen

Honors Program Projects

History and literature complement each other. The study of history can be beneficial to understanding literature, as literature can be beneficial to understanding history. Seamus Heaney’s poetry concerning the Troubles can be better understood with a background in the history of the conflict as well as some knowledge about Heaney’s own views. Through examining Heaney’s poetry with history and biography in mind, a greater understanding of the poetry can be achieved. Through the reading of Heaney’s poetry, a better insight into the personal side of the conflict can help the reader understand the conflict as well ...


Melville And The Trope Of The Starving American Artist In Rome, Erika Schneider Feb 2013

Melville And The Trope Of The Starving American Artist In Rome, Erika Schneider

Erika Schneider

No abstract provided.


Essex’S International Agenda In 1595 And His Device Of The Indian Prince, Linda Shenk Jan 2013

Essex’S International Agenda In 1595 And His Device Of The Indian Prince, Linda Shenk

English Publications

In the fall of 1595, Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, was poised to attain political greatness, and he knew it. The international political climate had become sufficiently precarious that a statesman with Essex‘s particular expertise in foreign intelligence and military matters possessed skills well-tailored to address England’s current crises. Spain was once again preparing to invade, this time with an armada greater than in 1588; relations with England’s key ally France were cooling; and the financial and military advantages of asserting a presence in the New World were becoming increasingly evident. Aware of this moment as opportune ...


Gambling On Empire: Colonial India And The Rhetoric Of “Speculation” In British Literature And Culture, C.1769-1830, John Curts Leffel Jan 2013

Gambling On Empire: Colonial India And The Rhetoric Of “Speculation” In British Literature And Culture, C.1769-1830, John Curts Leffel

English Graduate Theses & Dissertations

"Gambling on Empire" offers the first extended study of a central trope governing literary representations of British colonial expansion in India: "speculation." My study proceeds from a fundamental question: why do authors so frequently invoke this term in relation to the burgeoning Indian empire, relying upon it to characterize, in a negative fashion, the East India Company (EIC), its leaders and employees, and the men and women who emigrated to its stations? Through analyses of a wide range of works both from recognized authors such as Austen, Edgeworth, and Scott, and less well-known writers like Mariana Starke, Elizabeth Hamilton, and ...


The Unbought Grace Of Life: Chivalry In Western Literature, Richard N. Boggs May 2012

The Unbought Grace Of Life: Chivalry In Western Literature, Richard N. Boggs

Master of Liberal Studies Theses

The code of chivalry has a rich literary history. From the violence and misogyny of pre-chivalric ancient Greece and Rome, the chivalric code was constructed in a deliberate effort to curb and improve the most violent aspects of male behavior. The chivalric male ideal was built upon the tripartite foundation of the ancient archaic virtues, the gallantry of Germanic barbarians, and the Christian beatitudes. Chivalry sought a male ideal which brought raw strength and power under the concept of legitimate authority. By casting the literary male ideal – the knight – into the role of the defender of the weak and defenseless ...


A Dark Place Of The Earth: London And The Roots Of Urban Gothic, Terri Strong Jan 2012

A Dark Place Of The Earth: London And The Roots Of Urban Gothic, Terri Strong

Honors Theses

In the late Victorian era a new type of novel appeared. Dark and creepy, filled with supernatural creatures and twisted, sometimes violent plots, it resembled its Gothic predecessor of 200 years earlier. Building on the standard elements of the Gothic novel, this new fiction pierced the heart of the city. As the new genre brought the terror of Gothic fiction from isolated castles into the streets, it found its first home in the fog-shrouded city at the center of the Victorian age. Urban Gothic was rooted firmly in the soil of London.


Colonialism And Mandates, John C. Hawley Jan 2012

Colonialism And Mandates, John C. Hawley

English

Daily life in contemporary African countries must be understood as determined by their status as members of an interlocking network of postcolonies, striving to imagine themselves as related through Pan-Africanism but struggling first to realize themselves as fully functioning nations. Even though Ethiopia and Liberia are generally spoken of as the only countries in Africa that were not colonized, this actually suggests the level of subjugation the rest of the continent did experience. After all, if Italy failed in its attempt to take over Ethiopia in the 1880s, Mussolini succeeded in doing so in 1936; Liberia was, in fact, a ...


Rex Quondam, Rexque Futurus: Arthurian Legends As Indicators Of British National Identity Throughout History, Audrey Ellen Wimbiscus Jan 2012

Rex Quondam, Rexque Futurus: Arthurian Legends As Indicators Of British National Identity Throughout History, Audrey Ellen Wimbiscus

Senior Independent Study Theses

By looking at the texts of Arthurian legends such as Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, T.H. White's The Once & Future King, and Marion Zimmer Bradley's The Mists of Avalon, one can gain a historical perspective of the time in which each work was written. Through this historical perspective and by looking at each author's personal life, a picture of Great Britain's national identity at the time of writing can be seen. As such, the Arthurian Cycle can be used to exemplify British national identity throughout history.