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Full-Text Articles in European History

Anna Larpent And Shakespeare, Fiona Ritchie May 2018

Anna Larpent And Shakespeare, Fiona Ritchie

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

Anna Larpent (1758-1832) is a crucial figure in theater history and the reception of Shakespeare since drama was a central part of her life. Larpent was a meticulous diarist: the Huntington Library holds seventeen volumes of her journal covering the period 1773-1830. These diaries shed significant light on the part Shakespeare played in her life and contain her detailed opinions of his works as she experienced them both on the page and on the stage in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century London. Larpent experienced Shakespeare’s works in a variety of forms: she sees Shakespeare’s plays performed, both professionally ...


"To Conceive With Child Is The Earnest Desire If Not Of All, Yet Of Most Women": The Advancement Of Prenatal Care And Childbirth In Early Modern England: 1500-1770, Victoria E.C. Glover Jan 2018

"To Conceive With Child Is The Earnest Desire If Not Of All, Yet Of Most Women": The Advancement Of Prenatal Care And Childbirth In Early Modern England: 1500-1770, Victoria E.C. Glover

Theses and Dissertations

This thesis analyzes medical manuals published in England between 1500 and 1770 to trace developing medical understandings and prescriptive approaches to conception, pregnancy, and childbirth. While there have been plenty of books written regarding social and religious changes in the reproductive process during the early modern era, there is a dearth of scholarly work focusing on the medical changes which took place in obstetrics over this period. Early modern England was a time of great change in the field of obstetrics as physicians incorporated newly-discovered knowledge about the male and female body, new fields and tools, and new or revived ...


Piracy, Slavery, And Assimilation: Women In Early Modern Captivity Literature, David C. Moberly Apr 2011

Piracy, Slavery, And Assimilation: Women In Early Modern Captivity Literature, David C. Moberly

Dissertations, Theses, and Student Research: Department of English

This thesis examines a hitherto neglected body of works featuring female characters enslaved in Islamicate lands. During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, many Englishmen and women were taken captive by pirates and enslaved in what is now the Middle East and North Africa. Several writers of the time created narratives and dramas about the experiences of such captives. Recent scholarship has brought to light many of these works and pointed out their importance in establishing what was still a young, unsure, and developing English identity in this early period. Most of this scholarship, however, has dealt with narratives of the ...


Women In Eighteenth Century London: Female Coming Of Age In Frances Burney’S Evelina, Cecilia, And The Witlings, Kate Hamilton May 2009

Women In Eighteenth Century London: Female Coming Of Age In Frances Burney’S Evelina, Cecilia, And The Witlings, Kate Hamilton

Honors Scholar Theses

The late eighteenth-century author Frances Burney is best known for popularizing the “comedy of manners,” a literary style later adopted by Jane Austen. Burney’s novels, journals, and plays offer an intriguing commentary on contemporary social customs and etiquette. In particular, she voices the concerns and desires of women, leading scholars to focus on the feminist overtones of her writing. Although she carefully examined female roles in the household and family structure, Burney also provided an insider’s perspective into London high life. As an acclaimed author and member of the royal court, Burney offers a rare insight into the ...


To Be A Woman: Shakespeare's Patriarchal Viewpoint, Conley Greer Jan 2003

To Be A Woman: Shakespeare's Patriarchal Viewpoint, Conley Greer

The Corinthian

Shakespeare's characterization of women necessitates further study and discussion to fully appreciate his genius for interpreting human nature. Two plays in particular, Othello, The Moor of Venice and Measure for Measure, provide excellent female characters for scholarly analysis.