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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in European History

Essex’S International Agenda In 1595 And His Device Of The Indian Prince, Linda Shenk Jan 2013

Essex’S International Agenda In 1595 And His Device Of The Indian Prince, Linda Shenk

English Publications

In the fall of 1595, Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, was poised to attain political greatness, and he knew it. The international political climate had become sufficiently precarious that a statesman with Essex‘s particular expertise in foreign intelligence and military matters possessed skills well-tailored to address England’s current crises. Spain was once again preparing to invade, this time with an armada greater than in 1588; relations with England’s key ally France were cooling; and the financial and military advantages of asserting a presence in the New World were becoming increasingly evident. Aware of this moment as opportune ...


"To Love And Be Wise": The Earl Of Essex, Humanist Court Culture, And England's Learned Queen, Linda Shenk Jan 2007

"To Love And Be Wise": The Earl Of Essex, Humanist Court Culture, And England's Learned Queen, Linda Shenk

English Publications

During two particular decades of her reign—the 1560s and the 1590s—Queen Elizabeth I strategically and publicly represented herself as a learned prince. In the 1590s alone, she staged several significant demonstrations of her erudition: she delivered a Latin oration at the University of Oxford (1592) while university officials, prominent nobles, and international dignitaries looked on; in the months after Henri IV converted to Catholicism in 1593, she translated Boethius; in 1597, she trounced the Spanish-allied Polish ambassador with a pert Latin speech; and in 1598, she translated excerpts from Horace Ars poetica and Plutarch's essay De curiositate ...


Mildred Cooke Cecil, Linda Shenk Jan 2007

Mildred Cooke Cecil, Linda Shenk

English Publications

Married to William Cecil, Queen Elizabeth's chief advisor, Mildred Cooke Cecil occupied a rare position in Elizabethan England. She traveled in the inmost circles of high politics and occasionally participated directly in political, typically international, situations. Born on 25 August 1526 to Sir Anthony Cooke and Lady Anne Fitzwilliam, Cooke Cecil became one of the most famous learned women in England during and even after her lifetime. Elizabethan educator Roger Ascham lauded Cooke Cecil for being able to read Greek as easily as English. She had proven this skill by translating Greek works by the early church fathers, St ...


Anne Cooke Bacon, Linda Shenk Jan 2007

Anne Cooke Bacon, Linda Shenk

English Publications

Motivated by religious piety and a remarkable education, Anne Cooke Bacon was one of the most prominent and prolific women writers in Renaissance England. Scholars have called attention in particular to the transformation her writing underwent after the death of her husband, Sir Nicholas Bacon, in 1579. While he lived, Cooke Bacon translated religious works, modestly keeping the focus on the ideas of others. When she became a widow, she assumed a new voice and tone-assertive and often domineering-in letters of advice not only to her adult sons but to prominent male political figures as well.


Turning Learned Authority Into Royal Supremacy: Elizabeth I'S Learned Persona And Her University Orations, Linda Shenk Jan 2003

Turning Learned Authority Into Royal Supremacy: Elizabeth I'S Learned Persona And Her University Orations, Linda Shenk

Linda Shenk

When the princess Elizabeth studied languages and rhetoric with William Grindal and Roger Ascham, she acquired more than practical skills. She earned the right to depict herself as a learned prince. Throughout the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, the image of the educated monarch had gained particular political currency when humanist thinkers marketed the schoolroom as the necessary training ground for both king and counselor. Learned status served as proof that one was sufficiently wise and virtuous to hold political office.


Images Of Women In Eighteenth Century English Chapbooks, From Banal Bickering To Fragile Females , Katherine Barber Fromm Jan 2000

Images Of Women In Eighteenth Century English Chapbooks, From Banal Bickering To Fragile Females , Katherine Barber Fromm

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Eighteenth-century English chapbooks, an under-examined historical source, provide a rich panoply of images presented for popular consumption in cheap, ephemeral books. As part of popular culture, this humble literature changed over the course of the century. Of interest here are the images presented to women during this most significant century of chapbooks. Those of earlier decades retold traditional fairy tales and legends and reprinted jest books. In addition, there is a recurring strand of bickering and humorous exchanges between men and women. Ballads that depicted conjugal and marital relationships often found their way into chapbooks, and other chapbooks borrowed from ...


Early Modern English Understanding Of Islam Through The 1649 Alcoran Of Mahomet, Lemiya M. Almas Jan 1999

Early Modern English Understanding Of Islam Through The 1649 Alcoran Of Mahomet, Lemiya M. Almas

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

In search of sources that dealt with Islam in the 16th and 17thc I came across Samuel Chew's The Crescent and the Rose. Chew's book is best likened to a catalog where he manages to list a great number of works written prior to and during Early Modern England that dealt primarily with Islam. Of the thousands of sources that Chew listed one was of particular interest to me, namely the first English translation of the Koran in 1649. With the help of my major professor and the staff in the microform room at Parks Library, I was ...


Jane Howell And Subverting Shakespeare: Where Do We Draw The Lines?, Linda Shenk Jan 1995

Jane Howell And Subverting Shakespeare: Where Do We Draw The Lines?, Linda Shenk

Linda Shenk

When Ralph Berry asks RSC director Bill Alexander to explain how a director chooses to do a Shakespearean play in a certain manner, Alexander replies: "For me, it all boils down to this: how best can I reveal this play, how best can I release my own perception of the play, my own feeling of what it's about, and what it says and why he wrote it" (Berry 178). To fulfill these goals, directors often choose to set a play in a different historical context, devise a thematic doubling scheme, and/or cut lines to emphasize a specific concept ...