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Full-Text Articles in Theory and Criticism

An Incongruous Present: Identifying The Absurd Aesthetic In William Faulkner’S "Requiem For A Nun" (1951), Blake Hani Apr 2019

An Incongruous Present: Identifying The Absurd Aesthetic In William Faulkner’S "Requiem For A Nun" (1951), Blake Hani

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines the absurd aesthetic present in William Faulkner’s Requiem for a Nun (1951), in order to both re-open an otherwise disregarded text for more fruitful interpretations, as well as consider what constitutes a “successful” or “failed” text. By applying Albert Camus’s theories of the absurd developed in The Myth of Sisyphus (1942) and The Rebel (1951), a sense of logic or intention is revealed in Requiem for a Nun’s abrasive structural disjointedness and narrative incoherence. This absurd logic presents a subversion of the standards of successful narratives, as the text appears to self-reflectively meditate on ...


(Re-) Staging Translation: Meaningful Interaction With Hindu Devotional Objects In The Western Museum, Emma Efkeman Apr 2019

(Re-) Staging Translation: Meaningful Interaction With Hindu Devotional Objects In The Western Museum, Emma Efkeman

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this thesis, the Hindu devotional object will be tracked through many contexts and its role will change based on its geographic and cultural location. First, the original ritual context will be established, paying specific attention to ceremonial processes and actions that activate the objects. Next, I will sketch the approaches to interpretation used in the two museum spaces. In this movement between spaces, the Hindu object is de- and then re-contextualized. Museums can discover from this narrative the many ways that meaning is constructed, within and outside of a Western framework. It is this pivotal period of re-contextualization that ...


The Commodity Club: Commodity Fetishism In Modern Art And Tattoos, Shelby Maiden May 2018

The Commodity Club: Commodity Fetishism In Modern Art And Tattoos, Shelby Maiden

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The current culture of commodity fetishism that surrounds both modern art and tattoos are disproportionately a part of the perpetuation of an artificial sense of society and community. It promotes the notion that by simply by inking the deeper layers of their skin or by spending millions on a painting that somehow one becomes elevated and enters an elite space, or club, of people like them.


Virginia Woolf And The 'Objective' Camera: The Relationship Between Text And Image In Three Guineas And Orlando, Meilan Solly May 2018

Virginia Woolf And The 'Objective' Camera: The Relationship Between Text And Image In Three Guineas And Orlando, Meilan Solly

Undergraduate Honors Theses

Though photography offers a claim to objectivity that writing and painting cannot ostensibly equal, Virginia Woolf’s Three Guineas and Orlando: A Biography argue that the camera is not an unmediated form of documentation.Three Guineas’ images of a patriarchal society and Orlando’s more personal portraits reflect their photographers’ inherent subjectivity, and the photographs’ placement in and relationship with the texts further question the veracity of representation. Whereas Three Guineas derives its power from the contrast between reproduced and described photographs, Orlando uses images to present a counter-narrative contradicting the purported reliability of biographical accounts.


Impossible Parties: An Exploration Of The Convergence Of Life And Art As A Romantic Theory Of The Party, Amina Otto Jan 2018

Impossible Parties: An Exploration Of The Convergence Of Life And Art As A Romantic Theory Of The Party, Amina Otto

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The nature of the interaction between life and art has been a point of dispute in the field of Humanities for centuries, and we have failed to reach a consensus on which one imitates or informs the other. During the Romantic era, it was particularly difficult to separate the two, especially when considering some of the parties, balls, and fêtes that took place in that time. Romantic novelist Georges Sand provides a Romantic theory of the party as a work of art in her novel Lélia, and provides criteria that the ideal ball must meet in order to be successful ...


Transcultural Perspectives In Art History: Jan Van Eyck's Arnolfini Wedding Portrait, Mallory Evans Jan 2017

Transcultural Perspectives In Art History: Jan Van Eyck's Arnolfini Wedding Portrait, Mallory Evans

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis investigates the origins of objects and the meaning of gestures in Jan van Eyck’s Arnolfini Wedding Portrait (1434) from a transcultural perspective. Drawing upon the older scholarship, which it seeks to redirect by using reception theory and a de-colonial approach, I conclude that writing history is always strategic, never neutral, and that the historical record itself is laden with unresolvable ambiguities in the present case. For centuries, scholars have examined the painting and its details without reaching a consensus. My thesis examines the various interpretations of the painting through reception theory, taking into account who its intended ...


The Search For An Identity: The Merging Of The Past And Present To Form A Future In Italian Culture, Olivia Witwer Jan 2017

The Search For An Identity: The Merging Of The Past And Present To Form A Future In Italian Culture, Olivia Witwer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

A country is often defined by its national identity and how it expresses the history of its cultural characteristics. For a majority of its history, the Italian peninsula was a land that was separated by multiple dukedoms and republics that were also marked by war and violence. When Italy became a unified nation in 1861 it struggled to bring its unique cities together under one government and culture. This type of unification had already been progressing throughout much of Europe, whereas Italy was just starting to forge a unified national identity. In order to form a true national identity that ...


History Influencing History: Changing Perceptions Of The Starving Time At Jamestown, Kelsey Fenske May 2016

History Influencing History: Changing Perceptions Of The Starving Time At Jamestown, Kelsey Fenske

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The Starving Time is a fascinating period in American history, and the subject of substantial research for over a century. This paper closely examines twenty-four scholarly works that attempt to understand this period and place it in its proper context. The widespread fascination with the Starving Time stems from Jamestown’s importance in the history of the United States as the first permanent English settlement in America. Upon first glance, famine is not something that is usually associated with success, though. So it is intriguing that many Americans accept that the early years of what would become the United States ...


Salvador Dalí, Surrealism, And The Luxury Fashion Industry, Chantal Houglan May 2016

Salvador Dalí, Surrealism, And The Luxury Fashion Industry, Chantal Houglan

Undergraduate Honors Theses

My research offers a unique look at why as a surrealist artist Dalí felt the need explore the luxury fashion industry, given the fact that he achieved much of his recognition and success as a Surrealist painter. Salvador Dalí’s contributions to fashion may be entirely underrated, but I argue that they are his most truly Surrealist works of art.


Dust & Blood: Famine And Fertility In The Age Of Akhenaten, Alyssa Grace James Jan 2016

Dust & Blood: Famine And Fertility In The Age Of Akhenaten, Alyssa Grace James

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis expands on the ongoing inquiry into the unusual life of the pharaoh Akhenaten. Amongst the incongruities of his reign, the central deity known as the Aten has been one of the most elusive and heavily debated. The relationship between the pharaoh and the Aten was clearly central to much of the oddity of his reign, affecting the visual depiction of the pharaoh and the many alterations to the notion of kingship Akhenaten implemented. However, no clear understanding of Akhenaten or the Aten exists. Recent excavations at Amarna have allowed for a clearer view into these unanswered questions. It ...


Bathing In Modernity: Undressing The Influences Behind Edgar Degas And Mary Cassatt's Baigneuses, Maiji Castro Jan 2016

Bathing In Modernity: Undressing The Influences Behind Edgar Degas And Mary Cassatt's Baigneuses, Maiji Castro

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines how the motifs used in bathing genre paintings from Greek and Roman myths to eighteenth-century eroticism are evident in the bathing series of Edgar Degas and Mary Cassatt. The close professional relationship of Edgar Degas and Mary Cassatt is evident in the shared themes and techniques in their work and in personal accounts from letters by each other and their contemporaries. Both Degas and Cassatt desired to move away from historical genre painting, and instead to portray the changing emotions and social constraints of modern life. However, the extensive tradition from the Aphrodite of Knidos to Ingres ...


Men Cry: Embodiments Of Masculinity In Western Cinema Circa 1999, Forrest Hamrick Lotterhos Jan 2015

Men Cry: Embodiments Of Masculinity In Western Cinema Circa 1999, Forrest Hamrick Lotterhos

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines two films released in 1999, Fight Club (Fincher 1999) and Boys Don’t Cry (Pierce 1999), through the theoretical framework of queer theory, gender theory, and feminist theory to analyze systemic structures and cultural notions of masculinity. Mainstream cinema depicts gender identity and gender roles to promote bigenderism and maintain patriarchal hierarchy. Rarely films and the characters within them break out of this ideological norm. By depicting masculine identified characters who cry, Fight Club and Boys Don’t Cry expose the characters’ vulnerabilities and flaws and challenge the “perfect masculine ideal.” These films question what it means ...


Blurred Lines: Exploring Poetic And Musical Subjectivity In Verlaine And Debussy's "Romances Sans Paroles", Emily Eyestone Apr 2014

Blurred Lines: Exploring Poetic And Musical Subjectivity In Verlaine And Debussy's "Romances Sans Paroles", Emily Eyestone

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines the expression of subjectivity in poetry and music, through a comparison of nineteenth century French poet Paul Verlaine's poems in his collection Romances sans paroles with the musical settings of these poems by the composer, Claude Debussy. Using artistic subjectivity as the point of departure, I attempt to account for the ways in which these art forms may approximate or suggest similar ideas, despite their materially-different modes of expression. Each of the four chapters in this analysis focus on a comparison between one of Verlaine's and its accompanying musical transcription by Debussy. I engage in ...