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Other American Studies

2011

Articles 1 - 22 of 22

Full-Text Articles in Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

Archaeological Sites Along King Creek In Western Nacogdoches County, In East Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson, Mark Walters Jan 2011

Archaeological Sites Along King Creek In Western Nacogdoches County, In East Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson, Mark Walters

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The King Creek area of western Nacogdoches County in East Texas is known to be a locality where Historic Caddo sites (of the Allen phase, ca. A.D. 1650-1800) are abundant, or at least abundant relative to many other parts of East Texas. In addition to there being at least two branches of the late 17th-early 19th century El Camino Real de los Tejas that bisect the area on their way to crossings on the nearby Angelina River, three important Historic Caddo sites have been identified not far apart in the valley: J. T. King (41NAI5), David King (41NA32l), and ...


A Prehistoric Caddo Site On Black Fork Creek, Upper Neches River Basin, Smith County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson Jan 2011

A Prehistoric Caddo Site On Black Fork Creek, Upper Neches River Basin, Smith County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

During the course of recent archaeological survey investigations for a proposed waterline, a previously unrecorded prehistoric Caddo site Lakewood Gardens (41SM425)-was found near, but outside the right-of-way and construction casement of, the proposed waterline. This article provides summary details about the site, hopefully adding information to the sparse archaeological record of prehistoric Caddo sites along Black Fork Creek.

The site is situated on a natural upland rise (440 feet amsl) overlooking the Black Fork Creek floodplain less than 200 m to the north. Black Fork Creek is in the upper Neches River basin; the creek flows west into Prairie ...


A Case For Dehahuit’S Village, Part Ii, Jim Tiller Jan 2011

A Case For Dehahuit’S Village, Part Ii, Jim Tiller

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In this, the second of a two part series on Dehahuit’s village, we will use period materials to further establish a circumstantial case for the location of the village of this historic figure on Paw Paw Bayou in eastern Harrison County, Texas. In our discussion we will make use of selected distances and directions noted in the archival record and present a time and distance problem based on the journals of the Freeman and Custis expedition. We conclude with an analysis of Father José Puelles’ 1807 map of Texas and William Darby’s 1816 map of Louisiana.


Foster Trailed-Incised: A Gis-Based Analysis Of Caddo Ceramic Distribution, Duncan P. Mckinnon Jan 2011

Foster Trailed-Incised: A Gis-Based Analysis Of Caddo Ceramic Distribution, Duncan P. Mckinnon

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) allows for dynamic visualizations in the analysis of spatial distributions and the modeling of data clusters and outliers. An on-going analysis of Foster Trailed- Incised vessels found within the Caddo Homeland seeks to construct a distributional framework that can be applied and compared to additional Caddo ceramic types and site location attributes using a GIS database. Preliminary results show high frequencies of Foster Trailed-Incised vessels along the Ouachita and Red River drainages as well as along the Saline, Arkansas, and Little Missouri rivers in Arkansas. Additional possible varieties of Foster Trailed-Incised have ...


A Radiocarbon Date From A Middle Caddo Period Habitation Site On Hickory Creek, Houston County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2011

A Radiocarbon Date From A Middle Caddo Period Habitation Site On Hickory Creek, Houston County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The National Forests and Grasslands (U.S.D.A. Forest Service) in Texas (NFGT) conducted Passports in Time (PIT) projects in 2006 and 2007 on Hickory Creek in the Davy Crockett National Forest, Houston County, Texas. The work took place at four prehistoric archeological sites: 41HO13, HC-1, Hickory Creek #2 (HC-2), and HC-3, with the majority of the work occurring at the Hickory Creek #2 site. Following discussions with the NFGT, the NFGT agreed to turn over the collections and available notes/records to me for the purposes of completing a volunteer analysis of these collections and preparing a report ...


A Cache Of Maud Arrow Points And Other Artifacts From The Jim Clark Site, Red River County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2011

A Cache Of Maud Arrow Points And Other Artifacts From The Jim Clark Site, Red River County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In the winter of 2010, I was contacted by Robert Perino, son of the late Greg Perino, a well-known archaeologist who had worked extensively since the late 1960s along the Red River in southwest Arkansas, southeastern Oklahoma, and northeast Texas in the Caddo archaeological area. According to Robert Perino, Greg Perino had found a cache of 30 Maud arrow points at the Jim Clark site in Red River County, Texas, in 1975, and recorded the discovery in a journal, along with a ground stone celt and a ceramic vessel. It is not known with certainty if this cache was associated ...


The Pipe Site, A Late Caddo Site At Lake Palestine In Anderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2011

The Pipe Site, A Late Caddo Site At Lake Palestine In Anderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Buddy Calvin Jones excavated a Late Caddo cemetery and midden site he called the Lake Palestine site, in Anderson County, Texas, in March 1968. His notes indicate that a total of 21 Caddo burials were excavated at the site, and the burials were situated primarily around a midden of unknown dimensions. Jones' notes do not specify how many of the burials he excavated at the Pipe site, but one photograph in the records suggests he excavated at least three, one burial of which is the focus of this article.


Luminescence Dates From The Tuinier Farm Site (41hp237), Hopkins County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, James K. Feathers Jan 2011

Luminescence Dates From The Tuinier Farm Site (41hp237), Hopkins County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, James K. Feathers

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The luminescence dating of ceramics has been applied with some considerable success in a variety of settings—and on different ceramic wares—in North America, but since the days of Alpha Analytic (a subsidiary of Beta Analytic) in the early to mid-1980s, there have been no luminescence dating of Caddo ceramic wares in Northeast or East Texas. Given the abundance of ceramics of several different kinds and styles at all Caddo sites, the luminescence dating of both plain and decorated sherds recovered in situ from these many sites should be explored since it is a method “that dates the manufacture ...


An Earspool From Near Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma?, Robert L. Brooks Jan 2011

An Earspool From Near Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma?, Robert L. Brooks

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Earspools are generally acknowledged as status markers for ranking elites in Caddoan populations occupying the Arkansas River basin as well as the Caddo homelands in the Red River basin. In the Arkansas River basin, Baerreis and more recently Brown have discussed the attributes of earspools found at Spiro. There is also documentation for earspools found at other Arkansas River basin sites such as Harlan and Huffaker. Earspools at sites reported for the Red River basin include Gahagan and George C. Davis among others. However, the appearance of earspools at sites outside of the core areas is not well documented. Two ...


Digital Preservation And Spatial Representation At The Washington Square Mound Site (41na49), Nacogdoches County, Texas, Robert Z. Selden Jr. Jan 2011

Digital Preservation And Spatial Representation At The Washington Square Mound Site (41na49), Nacogdoches County, Texas, Robert Z. Selden Jr.

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Thirty-one years of excavations at the Washington Square Mound site (41NA49) have produced a large number of artifacts, excavation records, field notes, photographs, slides, maps, excavation profiles, and plan view maps. This article is the product of an effort to synthesize the aforementioned information for the initial field school which occurred in the summer of 1979. Through the use of geographic information systems (GIS), a digital grid was constructed atop aerial photography to house the digitized information within a spatial representation of the provenience from which it was recovered. This allows a query of the artifact catalog to produce the ...


Mountain Fork Archaeology: A Preliminary Report On The Ramos Creek Site (34mc1030), Elsbeth L. Dowd Jan 2011

Mountain Fork Archaeology: A Preliminary Report On The Ramos Creek Site (34mc1030), Elsbeth L. Dowd

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In May-June of 2010, the University of Oklahoma and the Oklahoma Archeological Survey co-sponsored a field school at the Ramos Creek site (34MC1030) in southeastern Oklahoma. Ramos Creek is located in the Ouachita Mountains along the Mountain Fork, a tributary of the Little River. Recently identified by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), this site is the northernmost known site with a Caddo component along this stream (Figure 1). The best-known Caddo sites identified for this drainage were tested during the Oklahoma River Basin Survey project of the 1960s and today are covered by the man-made Broken Bow Lake. Archaeological ...


An Unique Shell Gorget From Wood County, Texas, Jesse Todd Jan 2011

An Unique Shell Gorget From Wood County, Texas, Jesse Todd

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

During the excavations preceding the construction of Lake Fork Reservoir, archaeologists from Southern Methodist University uncovered a child's burial at the Gilbreath site (41WD538) in Wood County, Texas. The child was from 2 to 3 years of age and burial furniture consisted of five ceramic vessels and an unique marine shell gorget from the chest area. The age of the site, which has a Titus phase component, ranges from ca. A.D. 1430-1680.


Analysis Of Artifacts From A 2010 Surface Collection At The Pace Mcdonald Site (41an51), A Probable Middle Caddo Mound Center In Anderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Bo Nelson Jan 2011

Analysis Of Artifacts From A 2010 Surface Collection At The Pace Mcdonald Site (41an51), A Probable Middle Caddo Mound Center In Anderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Pace McDonald site (41AN51) is a prehistoric Caddo mound center on Mound Prairie Creek in Anderson County, Texas, in the upper Neches River Basin. With the permission of one of the landowners, Mr. Johnny Sanford, the Friends of Northeast Texas Archaeology has initiated an archaeological research effort at the site in 2010, the first part of which was an April 2010 surface reconnaissance of the Sanford lands at the site, and the surface collection of artifacts exposed there following shallow disking of several tracts within the known boundaries of the site. This article discusses the character of the artifacts ...


Early To Mid-19th Century Occupation At The Dead Cow Site (41sm324), Smith County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2011

Early To Mid-19th Century Occupation At The Dead Cow Site (41sm324), Smith County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Dead Cow site is an early to mid-19th century archaeological site located within the northern part (Sabine River basin) of the proposed Republic of Texas 1836 Cherokee Indians land grant in East Texas, generally east of the downtown area of the modem city of Tyler. Cherokee Indians had moved into East Texas by the early 1820s, and "most of the Cherokees cleared land and carved out farms in the uninhabited region directly north of Nacogdoches, on the upper branches of the Neches, Angelina, and Sabine rivers. By 1822 their population had grown to nearly three hundred."

To date, historic ...


Analysis Of The 19th Century Historic Archaeological Material Culture Remains From The Browning Site In Smith County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters Jan 2011

Analysis Of The 19th Century Historic Archaeological Material Culture Remains From The Browning Site In Smith County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Browning site (41SM195A) is located on a 3800 m2 alluvial terrace that overlooks the Auburn Creek floodplain in eastern Smith County, Texas. This setting is near the headwaters of a stream system in the Harris Creek drainage; Harris Creek meets the Sabine River ca. 34 km to the north. In the vicinity of the Browning site, the valley, being narrow with steep valley walls, offers few locations suitable for either prehistoric or historic occupations. Soils here arc Entisols; they vary in depth from 30-70 em across the landform, terminating at a sandstone C-horizon. These arc soils that formed ...


The Marcus Kolb Site (41ce438), Cherokee County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2011

The Marcus Kolb Site (41ce438), Cherokee County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In 200 l, Claude McCrocklin conducted metal detecting and test excavations at an historic 19th century site in the upper Neches River basin of East Texas. Based on the findings from that work, unreported until now, McCrocklin believed that this site was occupied by the East Texas Cherokee. This site, the Marcus Kolb site (41CE438), "was confirmed by the artifacts identical with those found on Lost Prairie in Arkansas." The Lost Prairie sites referred to by McCrocklin are the early 19th century Lost Prairie Cherokee sites along the Red River in southwestern Arkansas investigated by McCrocklin. The Marcus Kolb site ...


Some Notes On Replicating Prehistoric Pottery, John Miller Jan 2011

Some Notes On Replicating Prehistoric Pottery, John Miller

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

My interest in pottery replication began about 30 years ago. As an archeologist, I was often required to analyze collections of prehistoric pottery. My analytical techniques were limited but standard for the day and usually involved classifying pottery according to previously defined pottery types and varieties. While this type of classification helps archeologists develop chronologies and determine cultural affiliation, it provides little understanding of how pottery was actually made. I felt that I might be able to enhance my analytical skills and possibly glean a little more from the archeological record if I could learn more about how pottery was ...


Sourcing Red River Jasper: An Archaeological And Geological Investigation Of A Gravel Chert In The Red River Drainage, Elsbeth L. Dowd Jan 2011

Sourcing Red River Jasper: An Archaeological And Geological Investigation Of A Gravel Chert In The Red River Drainage, Elsbeth L. Dowd

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Red River Jasper, a lithic material found in the Red River drainage, is an understudied chert that was widely used by prehistoric populations in this region from the Archaic to late prehistoric (Caddo) periods. Despite its common occurrence at sites along the Red River, this tabular chert has received little attention compared to other raw materials on the eastern margin of the Southern Plains. Although the material is macroscopically diverse, ranging in color from brown to yellow to red, microscopic analysis indicates that the material is relatively homogeneous and likely came from a limited set of sources. The archaeological distribution ...


Reconstructing Ancient Foodways At The Jones Mill Site (3hs28), Hot Spring County, Arkansas, Mary Beth D. Trubitt, Kathryn Parker, Lucretia Kelly Jan 2011

Reconstructing Ancient Foodways At The Jones Mill Site (3hs28), Hot Spring County, Arkansas, Mary Beth D. Trubitt, Kathryn Parker, Lucretia Kelly

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Analyses of botanical and faunal samples and a new radiocarbon date provide a detailed picture of Indian foodways at the Jones Mill site on the Ouachita River in Arkansas. Hunting, plant processing, and fishing with nets is seen from Middle Archaic artifacts and features. Burned hickory nutshell found among clusters of fire-cracked rock shows the importance of nut masts as food between 6000-4300 B.C. By 1450 A.D., a more substantial community of people lived at Jones Mill. Refuse associated with traces of a Caddo period house provided direct evidence for the cultivation of maize and native Eastern Complex ...


Another Look At The Grace Creek #1 Site In Gregg County, Texas, As Seen Through Ceramic Analysis, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2011

Another Look At The Grace Creek #1 Site In Gregg County, Texas, As Seen Through Ceramic Analysis, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The purpose of this article is to present archeological findings obtained from a re-examination of the ceramic sherds from the Grace Creek #1 site (41GG33). The Grace Creek site has been identified as having an early Caddo component by Jones, one that was contemporaneous with the Caddo occupation at the George C. Davis site. Story, in fact, identifies Grace Creek #1 as a "modest Alto-phase habitation site." This re-examination was occasioned by ongoing studies of the Early Caddo ceramics from the ca. A.D. 970-1260 Boxed Springs mound center, and the opportunity thus presented to compare the Boxed Springs ceramic ...


Notes On The Hudnall-Pirtle Site (41rk4) In The Buddy Calvin Jones Collection At The Gregg County Historical Museum, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2011

Notes On The Hudnall-Pirtle Site (41rk4) In The Buddy Calvin Jones Collection At The Gregg County Historical Museum, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Hudnall-Pirtle site (41RK4) is an important Early Caddo (ca. A.D. 900-1200) period multiple mound center and large village situated on an alluvial terrace of the Sabine River in East Texas. Although best known through the archaeological investigations conducted by the Texas Historical Commission (on behalf of the Archaeological Conservancy) at the site in 1989 and 1990, Buddy Calvin Jones, then of Longview, completed his own investigations at the site in the 1950s and early 1960s, although he never published any of the archaeological findings from his work, and is has not been clear from the available records and ...


Analysis Of The Prehistoric Artifacts From The Pace Mcdonald Site (41an51), Anderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2011

Analysis Of The Prehistoric Artifacts From The Pace Mcdonald Site (41an51), Anderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Pace McDonald site (41AN51) is a poorly known prehistoric Caddo mound center on Mound Prairie Creek in Anderson County, Texas, in the upper Neches River Basin. With the permission of one of the landowners, Mr. Johnny Sanford, the Friends of Northeast Texas Archaeology are planning on initiating an archaeological research effort at the site in 2010. The ultimate purpose of this work is to learn more about the native history of this mound center-when it was occupied and used, and by which prehistoric Caddo group--its intra-site spatial organization, and ultimately obtain site-specific archaeological information that can help understand the ...