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Full-Text Articles in Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

Jienan Yuan (Chien Yuan) Interview, Lauren Smith Jun 2009

Jienan Yuan (Chien Yuan) Interview, Lauren Smith

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with record producer and composer Chien Yuan by Lauren Smith


Anita Chang Interview, Lauren Smith Jun 2009

Anita Chang Interview, Lauren Smith

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with filmmaker Anita Chang by Lauren Smith. For more information on the artist visit: http://anitachangworks.com/


Flo Oy Wong Interview, Angelika Piwowarczyk Jun 2009

Flo Oy Wong Interview, Angelika Piwowarczyk

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with Chinese American multimedia artist Flo Oy Wong by Angelika Piwowarczyk

http://www.flo-oy-wongartist.com/


Danny Pudi Interview, Shariq Jefferi Jun 2009

Danny Pudi Interview, Shariq Jefferi

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with comedian Danny Pudi by Shariq Jefferi


Cynthia Tom Interview, Lauren Swift May 2009

Cynthia Tom Interview, Lauren Swift

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with painter and president of the Asian American Women Artists Association Cynthia Tom by Lauren Swift


Chris Naka Interview, Cheryl Franzen May 2009

Chris Naka Interview, Cheryl Franzen

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with new media and video artist Chris Naka by Cheryl Franzen


Vincent Chung Interview, Pete Koszulinski May 2009

Vincent Chung Interview, Pete Koszulinski

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with the Foundation for Asian American Independent Media's graphic designer Vincent Chung by Pete Koszulinski


Larry Lee Interview, Ami Shah May 2009

Larry Lee Interview, Ami Shah

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with installation artist and curator Larry Lee by Ami Shah

Larry Lee website

View Larry's work in the AAOH project gallery


Vincent Pham Interview, Devin Meyer May 2009

Vincent Pham Interview, Devin Meyer

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with Vincent Pham a Doctoral Student at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and co-author of Asian Americans and the Media (Polity, 2008).


Gordon Cc Liao Interview, Elise Osenbaugh May 2009

Gordon Cc Liao Interview, Elise Osenbaugh

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with poet Gordon CC Liao


Yasufumi Nakamori Interview About Ysuhiro Ishimoto, Katherine Cloutier May 2009

Yasufumi Nakamori Interview About Ysuhiro Ishimoto, Katherine Cloutier

Asian American Art Oral History Project

2009 interview with Yasufumi Nakamori, friend of photographer Yasuhiro Ishimoto


The Archaeology Of The 16th And 17th Century Caddo In The Post Oak Savannah Of Northeast Texas: The Tuinier Farm (41hp237), R. A. Watkins (41hp238), And Anglin (41hp240) Sites In The Stoots Creek Basin, Hopkins County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Elsbeth Dowd, Lee Green, George Morgan, Bo Nelson, Leeanna Schniebs, Beau Schriever, Jesse Todd, Mark Walters Jan 2009

The Archaeology Of The 16th And 17th Century Caddo In The Post Oak Savannah Of Northeast Texas: The Tuinier Farm (41hp237), R. A. Watkins (41hp238), And Anglin (41hp240) Sites In The Stoots Creek Basin, Hopkins County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Elsbeth Dowd, Lee Green, George Morgan, Bo Nelson, Leeanna Schniebs, Beau Schriever, Jesse Todd, Mark Walters

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Tuinier Farm (41HP237), R. A. Watkins (41HP238), and Anglin (41HP240) sites are 16th to 17th century Caddo sites in the modern-day Post Oak Savannah of Northeast Texas. All three of the sites are located on Stouts Creek, in the eastern part of Hopkins County, Texas, a northward-flowing tributary to White Oak Creek in the Sulphur River basin; the modern channel of White Oak Creek lies ca. 15 km north of these sites. The Culpepper site (41HP1), a previously investigated mid-to late 17th century Caddo habitation and cemetery site, is about 2 km downstream. Small areas of tall-grass prairie lie ...


Prehistoric Artifact Assemblages From Sites Along Hickory Creek In The Davy Crockett National Forest, Houston County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson Jan 2009

Prehistoric Artifact Assemblages From Sites Along Hickory Creek In The Davy Crockett National Forest, Houston County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The National Forests and Grasslands (U.S.D.A. Forest Service) in Texas (NFGT) conducted Passports in Time (PIT) projects in 2006 and 2007 on Hickory Creek in the Davy Crockett National Forest, Houston County, Texas. The work—varying in extent—took place at four prehistoric archeological sites: 41HO13, HC-1, Hickory Creek #2 (HC-2), and HC-3, with the majority of the work occurring at HC-2.

We learned of the PIT projects at the sites in April 2007, when John Ippolitto, then Heritage Program Manager for the NFGT, mentioned the project to Perttula at the Annual Meeting of the Society for ...


Caddo Ceramics From An Early 18th Century Spanish Mission In East Texas: Mission San Jose De Los Nasonis (41rk200), Timothy K. Perttula, Bill Young, P. Shawn Marceaux Jan 2009

Caddo Ceramics From An Early 18th Century Spanish Mission In East Texas: Mission San Jose De Los Nasonis (41rk200), Timothy K. Perttula, Bill Young, P. Shawn Marceaux

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Mission San Jose de los Nasonis (4JRK200) and two contemporaneous Nasoni Caddo sites (41RK191 and 41RK197) were located by Mr. Bill Young more than 25 years ago in the southern part of Rusk County, Texas after the general area of the site had been cleared of timber. The mission site covers ca. 6.6 acres of an upland ridge along a small tributary to the Angelina River; the ridge projects into the Angelina River floodplain. The topographic setting of Mission San Jose conforms in all particulars to the settings of other known mission sites established among the Caddo: small hills ...


Documentation Of Caddo Funerary Objects In The Gilcrease Museum Collections, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson, Mark Walters, Robert Cast, Bobby Gonzalez Jan 2009

Documentation Of Caddo Funerary Objects In The Gilcrease Museum Collections, Timothy K. Perttula, Bo Nelson, Mark Walters, Robert Cast, Bobby Gonzalez

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This report is the latest in a series of reports produced and published by the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma, Historic Preservation Program, that concern the documentation of funerary objects in museum facilities that are subject to the provisions and regulations of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA). These documentation studies have been done either with grants from the National Park Service, or through funding provided by the museum facility. In the case of the present study of Caddo funerary objects in the collections at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, Oklahoma, the documentation effort was supported by a ...


Ceramic Comparisons Between Certain Historic Caddo Sites In Nacogdoches County, Texas: Henry M. (41na60), Spradley (41na206), And Deshazo (41na27), Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2009

Ceramic Comparisons Between Certain Historic Caddo Sites In Nacogdoches County, Texas: Henry M. (41na60), Spradley (41na206), And Deshazo (41na27), Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Henry M., Deshazo, and Spradley sites are three of the better and recently studied Historic Caddo ceramic assemblages in East Texas. All three are in Nacogdoches County, Henry M. and Deshazo on Bayou Loco, and Spradley on Lanana Creek.

How do these sites compare with respect to the decorative classes present in the utility wares and fine wares? All three sites are dominated by brushed utility wares. At Spradley, brushed pottery comprises 53.4% of the decorated sherds compared to 72.7-85.6% of the decorated sherds from Henry M. and Deshazo. Incised, punctated, and incised-punctated decorative classes, however ...


Caddo Origins, A Smith County Perspective, Mark Walters Jan 2009

Caddo Origins, A Smith County Perspective, Mark Walters

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Attempting to trace Caddo Origins in Smith County and surrounding counties depends a lot on what we end up defining as Caddo. Separating the Caddo culture from previous cultures in East Texas becomes tedious when trying to fit the available archaeological record to existing models of Woodland cultures. Krieger stated that there was no evidence in East Texas of a Woodland (or Hopewellian) culture, with Mississippian culture beginning as early as 500 B.C. I mention this partly for the sake of argument, but also to point out that in this area there is not such a clearcut difference between ...


Lake Naconiche Archaeology And Caddo Origins Issues, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2009

Lake Naconiche Archaeology And Caddo Origins Issues, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Sometime around ca. A.D. 800, Lake Naconiche sites were no longer occupied by Woodland period groups of the Mossy Grove culture solely making sandy paste pottery or living as mobile hunting-gathering foragers. At this time, from ca. A.D. 750-800 to around A.D. 900, colder and drier conditions began to dominate the local weather. After ca. A.D. 800, were the aboriginal groups Caddo peoples or acculturated Mossy Grove folks? Some findings from the Lake Naconiche archaeological investigations at the Boyette site (41NA285) are relevant to this issue of ethnic affiliations and local, but nevertheless regional momentous, cultural ...


Documentation Of Unassociated And Culturally Unidentifiable Funerary Objects In The U. S. Army Corps Of Engineers, Fort Worth District Collections Housed At The Texas Archeological Research Laboratory At The University Of Texas At Austin, Timothy K. Perttula, Robert Cast, Bobby Gonzalez, Bo Nelson Jan 2009

Documentation Of Unassociated And Culturally Unidentifiable Funerary Objects In The U. S. Army Corps Of Engineers, Fort Worth District Collections Housed At The Texas Archeological Research Laboratory At The University Of Texas At Austin, Timothy K. Perttula, Robert Cast, Bobby Gonzalez, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This report concerns the documentation of unassociated Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) funerary objects from prehistoric sites at several man-made reservoirs operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District (COE) in northeastern Texas: Lake Wright Patman, Lake O’ the Pines, and Lake Sam Rayburn in the Sulphur River, Big Cypress Creek, and Angelina River basins, respectively. These NAGPRA materials are presently held at the Texas Archeological Research Laboratory at The University of Texas at Austin (TARL).


Frankston Phase Ceramics From The Alcoa #1 (41an87) Site, Mound Prairie Creek, Anderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2009

Frankston Phase Ceramics From The Alcoa #1 (41an87) Site, Mound Prairie Creek, Anderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In 1990, Amick investigated a well-preserved Late Caddo Frankston phase midden deposit at the ALCOA #1 (41AN87) site on Mound Prairie Creek, about 7 km northeast of Palestine, Texas. During the course of that work, more than 900 Caddo ceramic vessel sherds and a few pipe sherds were recovered, but they were only cursorily described by Amick. That was unfortunate at the time because it appeared then, and is still evident now, that the ALCOA #I site was a single component 15th century A.D. Frankston phase settlement, and detailed study of the recovered ceramic assemblage would have provided unique ...


Documentation Of The Native American Ceramic Vessels From Northeastern Texas, Southern Arkansas, And Eastern Oklahoma In The Boyce Smith Museum In Troup, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Bo Nelson Jan 2009

Documentation Of The Native American Ceramic Vessels From Northeastern Texas, Southern Arkansas, And Eastern Oklahoma In The Boyce Smith Museum In Troup, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Boyce Smith Museum opened in 1968 with the purpose of displaying a large collection of Historic artifacts as well as Native American artifacts collected and/or purchased over the years by Mr. Boyce Smith of Troup, Texas, now deceased. After learning of the museum in 2002, and taking a short visit to the museum at that time, it was apparent that the Boyce Smith Museum contained an important collection of Native American ceramic vessels that warranted documentation. With the permission of Jo Beth Smith, the wife of Boyce Smith, and their son Rial Smith, we returned to the Boyce ...


Caddo Pottery Vessels And Pipes From Sites In The Middle And Upper Sabine And Upper Neches River Basins, Smith And Wood Counties, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Shawn Marceaux, Bo Nelson Jan 2009

Caddo Pottery Vessels And Pipes From Sites In The Middle And Upper Sabine And Upper Neches River Basins, Smith And Wood Counties, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Mark Walters, Shawn Marceaux, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This report documents two collections of Caddo ceramic vessels and pipes from sites of prehistoric to early historic age in Smith and Wood counties, Texas, in the upper Sabine and upper Neches river basins in East Texas. Most of these Caddo artifacts are from the J. A. Walters collection, with the remainder being from the Bernie Ward collection.


An Account Of The Birth And Growth Of Caddo Archeology, As Seen By Review Of 50 Caddo Conferences, 1946-2008, Hester A. Davis, E. Mott Davis Jan 2009

An Account Of The Birth And Growth Of Caddo Archeology, As Seen By Review Of 50 Caddo Conferences, 1946-2008, Hester A. Davis, E. Mott Davis

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Any 50th anniversary should be noticed as a milestone of some sort, whether of a person or a thing. In this case, any of you who can subtract will recognize that from 1946, when the first Caddo Conference occurred, to 2008 is more than 50 years. This is because between 1946 and 1965, there were only eight meetings, and we ran out of things to talk about (or people to agree to host the meetings) and did not meet in 1969. After the 12th meeting in 1970, we have managed to have a meeting every year, and we have maintained ...


The Caddo And The Caddo Conference, Pete Gregory Jan 2009

The Caddo And The Caddo Conference, Pete Gregory

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

There was one lone Caddo at the early Caddo Conference held at the University of Oklahoma campus—Mrs. Vynola Beaver Newkumet—then there was a long gap. In 1973, the Chairman of the Caddo Nation, Melford Williams, was the banquet speaker for the Conference, which was held in Natchitoches, Louisiana. A panel, consisting of Thompson Williams, Vynola Newkumet, Phil Newkumet, and Pete Gregory, was also part of that conference.


History Of The East Texas Caddoan/Caddo Research Group, 1996-2008, Timothy K. Perttula, Tom Middlebrook Jan 2009

History Of The East Texas Caddoan/Caddo Research Group, 1996-2008, Timothy K. Perttula, Tom Middlebrook

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Recently, the senior author of this article has been working with Hester Davis (Arkansas Archeological Survey) regarding the editing of her manuscript on the history of the Caddo Conference, which had its 50th meeting in March 2008. In her manuscript she laments the fact that there is very little time being spent by its participants in keeping track of its history: either in the form of transcripts of the meetings, notes on each conference, saving photographs and images, or actively maintaining an archive of materials resulting from each Conference. Davis pointed out that it was important to maintain a record ...


Ceramic Vessel Sherds From The Kah-Hah-Ko-Wha Site (41ce354), An Allen Phase Component In Northwestern Cherokee County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2009

Ceramic Vessel Sherds From The Kah-Hah-Ko-Wha Site (41ce354), An Allen Phase Component In Northwestern Cherokee County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Kah-hah-ko-wha site (41CE354) is an Historic Caddo Allen phase (ca. A.D. 1650-1800) habitation site situated in an upland saddle landform in the Flat Creek valley in the upper Neches River basin of East Texas. Flat Creek flows west a few kilometers to its confluence with the Neches River, not far downstream of Lake Palestine. The site was found and investigated as part of survey and test excavation investigations for a proposed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-permitted lake on Flat Creek in northwestem Cherokee County.

During those 2006 investigations, a large assemblage of Allen phase Caddo ceramics were ...


Late Caddo Ceramics From 41he337 In Henderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2009

Late Caddo Ceramics From 41he337 In Henderson County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Site 41HE337 is a Late Caddo settlement located on the north side of Caddo Creek, an eastward-flowing tributary to the Neches River, and just west of the city of Poynor, in Henderson County, Texas. Bill Young, an avocational archaeologist living in Corsicana, Texas, has a substantial collection of Caddo ceramic vessel sherds from the site. He gave his permission to study and document these materials as part of a broader study I am engaged in of post-A.D. 1300 Caddo ceramic traditions in the upper Neches River basin of East Texas.


The Ceramics From A Late Caddo Site On Mud Creek In Cherokee County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 2009

The Ceramics From A Late Caddo Site On Mud Creek In Cherokee County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This article discusses the character of a large assemblage of prehistoric Caddo vessel sherds from a Late Caddo site (41CE309) on Mud Creek in Cherokee County, Texas, not far from the creek's confluence with the Angelina River. The site was discovered by Bill Young, an avocational archaeologist and Texas Archeological Steward, on a terrace of Mud Creek, just west of the city of Reklaw, Texas.

During the course of a number of visits to the site in the 1980s, more than 2300 ceramic sherds were collected by Young, most of the sherds being found in the central part of ...


Prehistoric Caddo Ceramics From The Henry Lake Site (41ce324), Cherokee County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Tom Middlebrook Jan 2009

Prehistoric Caddo Ceramics From The Henry Lake Site (41ce324), Cherokee County, Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Tom Middlebrook

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This article discusses the character of the Caddo ceramics from a single component Frankston phase (ca. A.D. 1400-1650) occupation at the Henry Lake site (41CE324) in northwestern Cherokee County, Texas. This follows a brief discussion of the history of the site, and we conclude this article with a consideration of the temporal and cultural place of the site's Caddo ceramic assemblage within the upper Neches River basin.


Prehistoric Ceramics From The Browning Site (41sm195a), Mark Walters Jan 2009

Prehistoric Ceramics From The Browning Site (41sm195a), Mark Walters

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Archaeological work at the Browning site (4JSM195A) in eastern Smith County, Texas, has shown that it is a stratified site with two very distinct occupations: an early nineteenth century assemblage of artifacts in the upper zone overlying a buried prehistoric occupation. This occupation appears to be confined to the Woodland time period (ca. 500 B.C. to A.D. 800) with little evidence of any earlier or later prehistoric activity. The Woodland period in East Texas is a time of important cultural changes, "the most obvious (and most important?) of which is pottery-making and the bow and arrow."

The main ...