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Other American Studies

1996

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

Of Hearths And Houses, Tom Middlebrook, Ryan Middlebrook Jan 1996

Of Hearths And Houses, Tom Middlebrook, Ryan Middlebrook

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

During the 1993 East Texas Archeological Field School conducted at the Tyson site (41SY92) in western Shelby County, the junior author had an opportunity to participate in the excavation of a Caddoan hearth. The work was directed by Linda Lindsay, a graduate student in Anthropology at Southern Methodist University. This paper describes our findings and a few features of hearths and houses.

One goal of the 1993 Field School was to explore the area around Feature 3 looking for evidence of a house. This was accomplished by opening a 6 meter by 6 meter unit referred to as Block 1 ...


Caddo Ceramics On The Red River In North Central Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Earnest R. Martin, Bo Nelson Jan 1996

Caddo Ceramics On The Red River In North Central Texas, Timothy K. Perttula, Earnest R. Martin, Bo Nelson

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Caddo ceramics manufactured after A.D. 900 were widely traded in Texas, being found in some quantity on North Central, East Central, Central, and inland Southeast Texas archeological sites. They were also traded with prehistoric peoples in the Midwest (as far north as Iowa and Illinois) and the Southeastern U.S. While archeologists have known this for some time, much of the ceramic evidence for prehistoric Caddoan trade and exchange with other Native Americans has not been systematically compiled and studied, as became apparent during a recent review of the prehistoric and historic aboriginal pottery in Texas. Consequently, Caddoan archeologists ...


Book Review: Archeology In The Eastern Planning Region, Texas: A Planning Document, Robert L. Brooks Jan 1996

Book Review: Archeology In The Eastern Planning Region, Texas: A Planning Document, Robert L. Brooks

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

With the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act in 1966 and ensuing regulatory guidelines, a mandate for the development of "The State Historic Preservation Plan" was clearly established. During the late 1960s and the 1970s, because of limited funding and the absence of information on the structure of these plans, few states had formulated plans or if they had state plans, they were of an extremely general nature. In the 1980s, principally through funding initiatives on the part of the National Park Service and through the efforts of NPS preservation planners such as John Knoerl, many states began their ...


The Caddoan Oak Hill Village Site, J. Brett Cruse, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 1996

The Caddoan Oak Hill Village Site, J. Brett Cruse, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Rarely do prehistoric archeologists in North America have the opportunity to completely excavate and study an entire Native American community or village. To be able to expose a Native American village in its entirety provides a unique, and unprecedented, view of the past community and social arrangements that existed among Native American societies before contact with Europeans.

Recently, in northeast Texas, the Oak Hill Village site (41RK214), a large village occupied by prehistoric horticultural-agricultural Caddo peoples between about A.O. 1050 and 1450, was fully uncovered under the direction of J. Brett Cruse (then of Espey, Huston & Associates, Inc., Austin ...


The Arkansas River Valley: A New Paradigm, Revisionist Perspectives And The Archaeological Record, Robert L. Brooks Jan 1996

The Arkansas River Valley: A New Paradigm, Revisionist Perspectives And The Archaeological Record, Robert L. Brooks

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Recent articles by Schambach have proposed a new paradigm for the late prehistoric period in the Arkansas River Valley. These arguments challenge traditional and long held views on the subsistence economy, architecture, material culture, biological character, and trade relationships of the prehistoric populations of the Arkansas River Valley, and the middle portion of the Red River (the Sanders phase area). My intention in this paper is to examine Schambach's arguments based on a comprehensive review of the archaeological record and by also drawing upon explanatory models of cultural and economic behavior. For the most part, my comments pertain to ...


Continuing The Discussion Of The Spiroans And Their Entrepots: A Reply To Brooks's Critique Of My New Paradigm/Or The Archeology Of The Arkansas Valley, Frank Schambach Jan 1996

Continuing The Discussion Of The Spiroans And Their Entrepots: A Reply To Brooks's Critique Of My New Paradigm/Or The Archeology Of The Arkansas Valley, Frank Schambach

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Although Brooks seems to agree with me that the archeology of the Arkansas Valley requires a new paradigm, he clearly believes that mine -- which he apparently considers a poorly founded Binfordian screed written primarily for its shock value -- is not the one. Where, according to Brooks, have I gone wrong in my work on the archeology of the Arkansas Valley? Which of my generalizations does he consider so poorly grounded empirically as to suggest, as he insinuates, professionally and perhaps even ethically questionable work, and in what ways does he consider them deficient?


"Historical Processes And The Political Organization Of The Hasinai Caddo Indians": A Reply, Nancy Adele, Timothy K. Perttula Jan 1996

"Historical Processes And The Political Organization Of The Hasinai Caddo Indians": A Reply, Nancy Adele, Timothy K. Perttula

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In a recent volume of the Caddoan Archeology Newsletter, Daniel Hickerson argues that Apache aggression across the Southern Plains, Apache trade in horses and other European goods, and European-introduced diseases dramatically affected Caddo an populations by encouraging their migration south to the upper Neches/Angelina river basins area traditionally occupied by one segment of the Caddo, the Hasinai groups. In his opinion, the Hasinai confederacy was a nascent chiefdom that developed as a direct result of this mid to late-seventeenth century southern migration. As has been pointed out by Caddoan ethnographers, ethnohistorians, and archeologists for 50 years or more, the ...


The Womack, Gilbert, And Pearson Sites: Early Eighteenth Century Tunican Entrepots In Northeast Texas, Frank Schambach Jan 1996

The Womack, Gilbert, And Pearson Sites: Early Eighteenth Century Tunican Entrepots In Northeast Texas, Frank Schambach

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

For the past few months, I have been working on a detailed response to a paper by James Bruseth, Diane Wilson, and Timothy Perttula published in the fall issue of Plains Anthropologist. There, these authors challenge my Sanders entrepot hypothesis and my new paradigm for the Mississippi period archeology of the Arkansas Valley, claiming that the Sanders focus, as propounded by Alex D. Krieger, is alive and well, so much so that they have renamed it the Sanders phase to ready it for service in the 1990s and beyond.


Archaeological Investigation At The Marshall Powder Mill (41hs17), Confederate States Of America 1863-1865, Harrison County, Texas: 1994 Season, Thomas E. Speir, David H. Jurney Jan 1996

Archaeological Investigation At The Marshall Powder Mill (41hs17), Confederate States Of America 1863-1865, Harrison County, Texas: 1994 Season, Thomas E. Speir, David H. Jurney

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Northeast Texas Archeological Society, in conjunction with the East Texas, Dallas, and Tarrant County archeological societies, reinstated archaeological investigations at the Marshall Powder Mill (41HS17) in 1994 following several years of delicate negotiations with the landowner about the value of preserving this archaeological site. The Marshall Powder Mill manufactured gunpowder, small arms and cannon, and refurbished weaponry, and was one of several arsenals that served the Trans-Mississippi Department of the Confederate States of America from 1863 to 1865. None have been thoroughly investigated archaeologically, however, thereby ignoring a major aspect of the Confederacy's war effort, and an important ...