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Other American Studies

1992

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

An Intermediate Report On The James Bayou Survey, Marion County, Texas: A Search For Caddo Village, Claude Mccrocklin Jan 1992

An Intermediate Report On The James Bayou Survey, Marion County, Texas: A Search For Caddo Village, Claude Mccrocklin

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This is a brief report on an archeological survey of James Bayou in East Texas that was organized to find the site of a large Historic Caddo Indian village that was reported to be in the area. Much is known about the village people. They were Kadohadacho Caddo from the Great Bend region of the Red River in Southwest Arkansas who had migrated to the area now known as James Bayou about 1800. The population of the village they established was reported to be near 500 people, and they stayed in the East Texas and Northwest Louisiana area into the ...


The Caddo Indian Village, Jacques Bagur Jan 1992

The Caddo Indian Village, Jacques Bagur

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Kadohadacho, or Great Chiefs, of the Caddo Nation left their home in the Great Bend of the Red River in Arkansas in 1790 because of disease and Osage depredations and moved south, joining a related tribe, the Petit Caddo, on the floodplain of the Red River above present-day Shreveport. In 1800, when the Great Raft began to affect the area, the Caddos moved to higher ground on Sodo Lake (a complex of five lakes that later came to be called Caddo, Clear, Cross, Shifttail, and Soda). They lived there until the early 1840s, when they sold their land to ...


Native American Integration In 19th Century Anglo-American Society: An Archaeological Perspective From Northeastern Texas, Frank Winchell, David H. Jurney Jan 1992

Native American Integration In 19th Century Anglo-American Society: An Archaeological Perspective From Northeastern Texas, Frank Winchell, David H. Jurney

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This paper will examine the phenomenon of Native American-Anglo-American integration on the frontier of Northeastern Texas during the 19th century. First, a brief overview of the historic setting will be presented on where and how this integration took place and who were the primary players. Second, we discuss the material cultural manifestations of this interaction, and what problems it presents for interpreting the archaeological record. Finally, we conclude that what have been previously described and defined as typical 19th century Anglo-American frontier homesteads of Northeastern Texas warrant a different interpretive perspective, and in fact, many of these "typical" first wave ...