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Other American Studies

1991

Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

A Perspective On Arkansas Basin And Ozark Highland Prehistory, J. Daniel Rogers Jan 1991

A Perspective On Arkansas Basin And Ozark Highland Prehistory, J. Daniel Rogers

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

It is, from time to time, valuable to reassess and perhaps shed new light on long-held perspectives. In "The 'Northern Caddoan Area' was not Caddoan," Frank Schambach provides a provocative reinterpretation of the archaeology of the Arkansas Basin and Ozark Highland regions of Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Missouri. While certain comments in this paper have merit and deserve deeper consideration, the central theme and supporting arguments are severely flawed, both from conceptual and data points of view.

Schambach's central argument is that there were no Caddoans in the Arkansas Basin and Ozark Highlands north of Spiro. To make this point ...


Notes From The Northwest Louisiana Regional Archaeology Program, Jeff Girard Jan 1991

Notes From The Northwest Louisiana Regional Archaeology Program, Jeff Girard

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

During the spring of 1990 a project was started by the Northwest Louisiana Regional Archaeology Program to re-locate and update information on sites in northwestern Louisiana initially investigated by Dr. Clarence Webb of Shreveport. A summary of information from several sites likely to be of interest to Caddo archaeologists is presented here.

The Regional Archaeology Program i.a jointly sponsored by Northwestern State University and the Louisiana Division of Archaeology. The primary purpose of the program is to record and update information about archaeological sites in the region located on private and state lands. The program also will compile and ...


The Cheatwood Place (41rr181), A Midden Mound Along Little Mustang Creek, Red River County, Texas, Steve Gaither, Timothy K. Perttula, Gary Cheatwood Jan 1991

The Cheatwood Place (41rr181), A Midden Mound Along Little Mustang Creek, Red River County, Texas, Steve Gaither, Timothy K. Perttula, Gary Cheatwood

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Cheatwood Place is a multi-component midden mound located on an upland projection at the confluence of Christopher Branch and Little Mustang Creek, about 1.5 kilometers north of the Sulphur River. The site has thick midden deposits with excellent fauna! and shell preservation, and promises to contribute important information on several periods of Sulphur River prehistory. The archaeological record in this part of the Sulphur River basin is not well known at present.

Investigations at the Cheatwood Place site have been limited to surface collections, and the excavation by Cheatwood of a single 1 x 1 meter test unit ...


Alcoa #1 (41an87): A Frankston Phase Settlement Along Mound Prairie Creek, Anderson County, Texas, Clyde Amick, Ed Furman, Timothy K. Perttula, James E. Bruseth, Bonnie C. Yates Jan 1991

Alcoa #1 (41an87): A Frankston Phase Settlement Along Mound Prairie Creek, Anderson County, Texas, Clyde Amick, Ed Furman, Timothy K. Perttula, James E. Bruseth, Bonnie C. Yates

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The ALCOA #1 (41AN87) site is a Frankston Phase (ca. A.D. 1400-1650) site located on a high alluvial terrace of Mound Prairie Creek, about seven kilometers northeast of Palestine, Texas. Mound Prairie Creek, a perennial stream, flows southeast to east across the county and drains into the Neches River. The site is approximately 10 meters above the Mound Prairie Creek floodplain, and the creek channel is 300 meters to the south.

Although the investigations at the site have been rather limited to date, it appears that the ALCOA #1 site is a single component Frankston Phase homestead, or possibly ...


Preliminary Report On An Archeological Survey Of Stormy Point, Jim Hardey, Claude Mccrocklin Jan 1991

Preliminary Report On An Archeological Survey Of Stormy Point, Jim Hardey, Claude Mccrocklin

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This is a report on an archaeological survey of the point of land that extends south into Caddo Lake opposite Mooringsport, Louisiana. The nineteenth century name for this area was Stormy Point, and the area into which Stormy Point extends was called Ferry Lake in 1839. The primary purpose of the survey was to find eighteenth century and early nineteenth century Caddo Indian sites, with the focal point of the survey being the thirty acre southwest tip of the point; other areas were looked at but not thoroughly investigated. Prehistoric Indian and early Anglo-American sites found while surveying for the ...


Hudnall-Pirtle Site: An Early Caddoan Mound Complex In Northeast Texas, James E. Burseth Jan 1991

Hudnall-Pirtle Site: An Early Caddoan Mound Complex In Northeast Texas, James E. Burseth

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Hudnall-Pirtle (41RK4) site is situated on a large T-1 alluvial terrace of the Sabine River in northern Rusk County of Texas. This part of Texas, comm.only referred to as Northeast Texas, is part of the Southern Gulf Coastal Plain, a relatively level, sloping plain formed by pre-Pleistocene embayments of the Gulf of Mexico. From a biogeographical perspective, the site is located in the Oak-Hickory-Pine Forest. This area represents the western extension of the Southern coniferous forests, and is dominated by shortleaf, longleaf, slash, and loblolly pine trees. In the floodplains of rivers and major creeks of Northeast Texas ...


Coles Creek Culture And The Trans-Mississippi South, Frank F. Schambach Jan 1991

Coles Creek Culture And The Trans-Mississippi South, Frank F. Schambach

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

Certain Lower Mississippi Valley (LMV) traits, mostly Coles Creek ceramic traits, but also traits such as temple mounds and certain mortuary patterns, appear at Late Fourche Maline and Early Caddo sites in the Trans-Mississippi South, particularly at sites in the Red River Valley in northwest Louisiana and southwest Arkansas. Explaining how these traits got there and understanding their role in the development of Caddo culture is one of the basic problems in the archaeology of this area. The conventional explanation has long been that they represent a full scale intrusion of Coles Creek culture into the Trans-Mississippi South. Thus Michael ...