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Other American Studies

1990

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Other History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

Was The Cypress Cluster One Of The (Many) Victims Of The 1539 - 1543 De Soto Expedition?, J. Peter Thurmond Jan 1990

Was The Cypress Cluster One Of The (Many) Victims Of The 1539 - 1543 De Soto Expedition?, J. Peter Thurmond

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In my master's thesis on the archeology of the Cypress creek basin (Thurmond 1981) and a subsequent article in the Bulletin of the Texas Archeological Society, I proposed the identification of a third late prehistoric-protohistoric confederacy for the Caddoan area of northeast Texas, in addition to those of the Hasinai and Kadohadacho. I named the archeological manifestation of this hypothesized sociopolitical entity the Cypress cluster, following a model of late Caddoan sociopolitical organization formulated by Dee Ann Story. The Cypress cluster is centered geographically on the upper Cypress Creek, White Oak Bayou and Lake Fork Creek basins. Two sequential ...


The Archaeological Conservancy: Ten Years Of Preservation Success And The New Landowner's Preservation Partnership Program, Bonnie C. Mckee Jan 1990

The Archaeological Conservancy: Ten Years Of Preservation Success And The New Landowner's Preservation Partnership Program, Bonnie C. Mckee

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

The Archaeological Conservancy, the only national nonprofit organization dedicated solely to the acquisition of cultural resource sites for preservation and future re search, celebrated ten years of operation in January 1990. Since its founding, the Conservancy has acquired 57 sites in eleven states. In the Caddoan Cultural Area, the Conservancy currently owns four sites (Grobin Davis in Oklahoma [34MC253], and Hale [41TT12], Fasken (41RR14], and Hudnall-Pirtle [41 RK4] in Texas} and holds a conservation easement for Cabe Mounds (41BW14), near Texarkana, Texas.

While the Conservancy's major focus for permanent preservation is the acquisition of sites to hold as archeological ...


An Assessment Of The Fourche Maline Culture And Its Place In The Prehistory Of Northeast Texas, Frank Winchell Jan 1990

An Assessment Of The Fourche Maline Culture And Its Place In The Prehistory Of Northeast Texas, Frank Winchell

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

This paper is based on the works of many authors who have investigated and written upon archaeological materials involving pre-Caddo cultures that existed in the Caddo Area, west of the Mississippi River. I will be concentrating on one particular archaeological manifestation known as the Fourche Maline Culture, which existed perhaps as early as 500 B.C. and ended sometime during the 2nd millenium A.D.

The origins of the Fourche Maline Culture are still not well understood, however, it can be stated with some assurance that it was an in-place development occurring somewhere within the Caddo Area. How far widespread ...


The "Northern Caddoan Area" Was Not Caddoan, Frank F. Schambach Jan 1990

The "Northern Caddoan Area" Was Not Caddoan, Frank F. Schambach

Index of Texas Archaeology: Open Access Gray Literature from the Lone Star State

In this paper I will challenge one of the major unexamined assumptions in the archeology of Eastern North America, the assumption that the Arkansas River Valley and Ozark Highland regions of eastern Oklahoma and western Arkansas, the so-called northern Caddoan Area, was the home of Caddo people who were closely related culturally and linguistically to the Caddo people of southwest Arkansas, northwest Louisiana, east Texas, and southeast Oklahoma. I will propose, instead, that the archeology of this locality is much more complex and interesting than the conventional wisdom would have it. What is involved here, I suggest, is not one ...