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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Artemisia Gentileschi's Female Subjects: Susanna, Judith, And Danaë In Baroque Painting, Sarah Bartolotta Apr 2018

Artemisia Gentileschi's Female Subjects: Susanna, Judith, And Danaë In Baroque Painting, Sarah Bartolotta

Senior Capstone Theses

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1654) grew up in Rome during the late sixteenth, early seventeenth century. She was unable to study art at the academy because she was a woman. Her father, Orazio Gentileschi, was an accomplished artist who taught his daughter to paint. In 1610, Orazio hired Agostino Tassi, another successful artist who had worked with Orazio before on various commissions, to teach Artemisia the rules of perspective. In 1612, Tassi was charged by Orazio with the destruction of property. It was discovered that a year prior, in 1611, Tassi forcibly deflowered Artemisia before beginning a regular sexual relationship with her ...


Being Seen: An Art Historical And Statistical Analysis Of Feminized Worship In Early Modern Rome, Olivia J. Belote Apr 2011

Being Seen: An Art Historical And Statistical Analysis Of Feminized Worship In Early Modern Rome, Olivia J. Belote

History Honors Projects

Female saints in early Christianity found their place in public veneration often through violent means, martyrdom. These saints, while publicly suffering in the imitation of Christ, were the original agents to navigate the gendered hierarchy within the religion. Female saints created an avenue for later female worshippers to understand Christianity on a strictly feminine level. Through the frescoed depictions of these female saints in 18 churches throughout Rome, this paper historically and statistically analyzes how the artistic representations of female saints added to or created a space for feminized worship.