Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Artemisia Gentileschi's Female Subjects: Susanna, Judith, And Danaë In Baroque Painting, Sarah Bartolotta Apr 2018

Artemisia Gentileschi's Female Subjects: Susanna, Judith, And Danaë In Baroque Painting, Sarah Bartolotta

Senior Capstone Theses

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1654) grew up in Rome during the late sixteenth, early seventeenth century. She was unable to study art at the academy because she was a woman. Her father, Orazio Gentileschi, was an accomplished artist who taught his daughter to paint. In 1610, Orazio hired Agostino Tassi, another successful artist who had worked with Orazio before on various commissions, to teach Artemisia the rules of perspective. In 1612, Tassi was charged by Orazio with the destruction of property. It was discovered that a year prior, in 1611, Tassi forcibly deflowered Artemisia before beginning a regular sexual relationship with her ...


Veduta Del Tempio Di Antonino E Faustino In Campo Vaccino, Emma J. Conant-Hiley Oct 2017

Veduta Del Tempio Di Antonino E Faustino In Campo Vaccino, Emma J. Conant-Hiley

Wonders of Nature and Artifice

Giovanni Battista Piranesi is one of history’s best etchers and architects. His two main series of copper etchings, I Carceri (The Prisons) and Vedute (The Views) spread out across the European continent and beyond both during his life and after his death. The “Wonders of Nature and Artifice” exhibition at Schmucker Art Gallery is lucky to have one of his original prints from the Vedute series generously on loan, from the Collection of Professor Charles F. Emmons, Professor of Sociology here at Gettysburg College. The print sizes in at 35 inches by 25 and a half inches, depicting a ...


"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff Dec 2014

"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff

History Faculty Publications

From the Intro: “Arms and the Man I sing…” So Vergil begins his epic tale of Aeneas, who overcomes tremendous obstacles to find and establish a new home for his wandering band of Trojan refugees. Were it metrically possible, Vergil could have begun with “Cities and the Man I sing,” for Aeneas’ quest for a new home involves encounters with cities of all types: ancient and new, great and small, real and unreal. These include Dido’s Carthaginian boomtown (1.419–494), Helenus’ humble neo-Troy (3.349–353) and Latinus’ lofty citadel (7.149–192). Of course, central to his ...


Mapping Jews: Cartography And Topography In Rome's Ghetto, Samuel D. Gruber Dr. Dec 2012

Mapping Jews: Cartography And Topography In Rome's Ghetto, Samuel D. Gruber Dr.

Samuel D. Gruber, Ph.D.

This paper examines how the Ghetto of Rome was represented in the many view-plans and maps of Rome from the 16th through 18th centuries, and how this mapping both tells us much about the physical appearance of the Ghetto and also how it was perceived by others in particular and presented to others more generally.


Being Seen: An Art Historical And Statistical Analysis Of Feminized Worship In Early Modern Rome, Olivia J. Belote Apr 2011

Being Seen: An Art Historical And Statistical Analysis Of Feminized Worship In Early Modern Rome, Olivia J. Belote

History Honors Projects

Female saints in early Christianity found their place in public veneration often through violent means, martyrdom. These saints, while publicly suffering in the imitation of Christ, were the original agents to navigate the gendered hierarchy within the religion. Female saints created an avenue for later female worshippers to understand Christianity on a strictly feminine level. Through the frescoed depictions of these female saints in 18 churches throughout Rome, this paper historically and statistically analyzes how the artistic representations of female saints added to or created a space for feminized worship.


The Column And Coinage Of C. Duilius: Innovations In Iconography In Large And Small Media In The Middle Republic, Eric Kondratieff Jan 2004

The Column And Coinage Of C. Duilius: Innovations In Iconography In Large And Small Media In The Middle Republic, Eric Kondratieff

History Faculty Publications

"[From the conclusion]: This discussion presents a linked series of hypotheses, each one suggested in its turn by evidence relating directly to C. Duilius (cos. 260), and contextualized by near-contemporary precedents wherever possible, or relevant-seeming analogues from slightly later periods. Taken together, these hypotheses support a plausible scenario in which the elogium on Duilius’ rostral column may be read not only as an account of a cunning and audacious commander whose pioneering efforts in naval warfare destroyed the myth of Carthaginian supremacy at sea, but also as an encomium on a generous benefactor to Rome’s citizenry. The inscription’s ...