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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Myth, Power, And The Other: The Shared Rhetoric Of Empire Between The Classical Mediterranean And Victorian Britain, Cara Redalen Jan 2019

Myth, Power, And The Other: The Shared Rhetoric Of Empire Between The Classical Mediterranean And Victorian Britain, Cara Redalen

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis traces the continuity of rhetoric concerning empire from ancient Greece, to Rome, and to Victorian Britain. Through examining theory, literature, and visual arts, this thesis will unpack both ancient and Victorian forms of representation and rhetoric. It charts the development of these forms of representation across centuries, exposing a persistence of thought and ultimately arguing for the force of this rhetorical tradition for defining societal status and bolstering imperial power. The thesis is divided into two main areas of focus: The Creation of the Other and Myth. The Creation of the Other section examines literature to demonstrate how ...


The Column And Coinage Of C. Duilius: Innovations In Iconography In Large And Small Media In The Middle Republic, Eric Kondratieff Jan 2004

The Column And Coinage Of C. Duilius: Innovations In Iconography In Large And Small Media In The Middle Republic, Eric Kondratieff

History Faculty Publications

"[From the conclusion]: This discussion presents a linked series of hypotheses, each one suggested in its turn by evidence relating directly to C. Duilius (cos. 260), and contextualized by near-contemporary precedents wherever possible, or relevant-seeming analogues from slightly later periods. Taken together, these hypotheses support a plausible scenario in which the elogium on Duilius’ rostral column may be read not only as an account of a cunning and audacious commander whose pioneering efforts in naval warfare destroyed the myth of Carthaginian supremacy at sea, but also as an encomium on a generous benefactor to Rome’s citizenry. The inscription’s ...