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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff Dec 2014

"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff

History Faculty Publications

From the Intro: “Arms and the Man I sing…” So Vergil begins his epic tale of Aeneas, who overcomes tremendous obstacles to find and establish a new home for his wandering band of Trojan refugees. Were it metrically possible, Vergil could have begun with “Cities and the Man I sing,” for Aeneas’ quest for a new home involves encounters with cities of all types: ancient and new, great and small, real and unreal. These include Dido’s Carthaginian boomtown (1.419–494), Helenus’ humble neo-Troy (3.349–353) and Latinus’ lofty citadel (7.149–192). Of course, central to his ...


Mapping Jews: Cartography And Topography In Rome's Ghetto, Samuel D. Gruber Dr. Dec 2012

Mapping Jews: Cartography And Topography In Rome's Ghetto, Samuel D. Gruber Dr.

Samuel D. Gruber, Ph.D.

This paper examines how the Ghetto of Rome was represented in the many view-plans and maps of Rome from the 16th through 18th centuries, and how this mapping both tells us much about the physical appearance of the Ghetto and also how it was perceived by others in particular and presented to others more generally.


The Discourse Of Columns, Dale Kinney Jan 2011

The Discourse Of Columns, Dale Kinney

History of Art Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


The Column And Coinage Of C. Duilius: Innovations In Iconography In Large And Small Media In The Middle Republic, Eric Kondratieff Jan 2004

The Column And Coinage Of C. Duilius: Innovations In Iconography In Large And Small Media In The Middle Republic, Eric Kondratieff

History Faculty Publications

"[From the conclusion]: This discussion presents a linked series of hypotheses, each one suggested in its turn by evidence relating directly to C. Duilius (cos. 260), and contextualized by near-contemporary precedents wherever possible, or relevant-seeming analogues from slightly later periods. Taken together, these hypotheses support a plausible scenario in which the elogium on Duilius’ rostral column may be read not only as an account of a cunning and audacious commander whose pioneering efforts in naval warfare destroyed the myth of Carthaginian supremacy at sea, but also as an encomium on a generous benefactor to Rome’s citizenry. The inscription’s ...