Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Italy

Discipline
Institution
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type

Articles 1 - 21 of 21

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Marsilio Ficino's Astral Psychology: The Inner Cosmos Of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese On The Astronomical Ceiling Fresco Of Sala Del Mappamondo At Caprarola, Renata R. Nagy Jan 2018

Marsilio Ficino's Astral Psychology: The Inner Cosmos Of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese On The Astronomical Ceiling Fresco Of Sala Del Mappamondo At Caprarola, Renata R. Nagy

Honors Undergraduate Theses

This thesis intends to explore the relationship between the Neoplatonist doctrines of the Renaissance philosopher, Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499), and astrological images in the Renaissance. The astrological ceiling fresco located in the Room of Maps in the Villa Farnese at Caprarola is in the center of the argument, which I analyze based on the metaphysical works of Ficino, the Platonic Theology (1482) and the Three Books on Life (1492). Authors have examined the fresco decoration and Ficinian philosophy individually, but never together. This study is the first to recognize Ficino's influence on Renaissance astrological images in its entirety.The present ...


Gentile Da Fabriano's Adoration Of The Magi: Iconographic Influences Of Decorative Arts From The Islamic World, Ruby Brooke Jan 2018

Gentile Da Fabriano's Adoration Of The Magi: Iconographic Influences Of Decorative Arts From The Islamic World, Ruby Brooke

Senior Projects Spring 2018

This project is an exploration of Islamic influences on the Adoration of the Magi (1423) by Gentile da Fabriano. The use of pseudo-inscriptions and Eastern textiles in the painting are central to the investigation of the work. I discuss the contact between the Republic of Florence and Muslim regions and the role of trade, crusades, and political contact on the arts of Quattrocento Florence. I analyze the extent of patron's contributions to the iconography in the altarpiece and the social and political implications of the piece.


The Partimento Tradition In The Shadow Of Enlightenment Thought, Deborah Longenecker Apr 2017

The Partimento Tradition In The Shadow Of Enlightenment Thought, Deborah Longenecker

The Research and Scholarship Symposium

This presentation investigates the relationship between partimento pedagogy and Rameau’s music theories as influenced by Enlightenment thought. Current research on partimento has revealed its importance in Neapolitan music schools of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Along with counterpoint, partimento was a core subject in the study of composition in the Neapolitan schools; however, as pedagogy and theory began to be influenced by Enlightenment ideals such as the scientific method or a preference for clear systemization, the partimento tradition began to wane. In this presentation, I examine Rameau’s music theory as an example of Enlightenment thought in music, juxtaposing ...


The Search For An Identity: The Merging Of The Past And Present To Form A Future In Italian Culture, Olivia Witwer Jan 2017

The Search For An Identity: The Merging Of The Past And Present To Form A Future In Italian Culture, Olivia Witwer

Undergraduate Honors Theses

A country is often defined by its national identity and how it expresses the history of its cultural characteristics. For a majority of its history, the Italian peninsula was a land that was separated by multiple dukedoms and republics that were also marked by war and violence. When Italy became a unified nation in 1861 it struggled to bring its unique cities together under one government and culture. This type of unification had already been progressing throughout much of Europe, whereas Italy was just starting to forge a unified national identity. In order to form a true national identity that ...


Incremental Urbanism In Medieval Italy: The Example Of Todi, Samuel D. Gruber Dr. Dec 2016

Incremental Urbanism In Medieval Italy: The Example Of Todi, Samuel D. Gruber Dr.

Samuel D. Gruber, Ph.D.

The shape and texture of the medieval Italian city is examined in this study of the small decisions made to create the urban form of the medieval Umbrian town of Todi.


The Loggia: Renaissance Revival Of Ancient Roman Villa Ideology As Manifest In A Liminal Space, John Francisco Cherichello Jan 2016

The Loggia: Renaissance Revival Of Ancient Roman Villa Ideology As Manifest In A Liminal Space, John Francisco Cherichello

Senior Projects Spring 2016

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Arts of Bard College.


Book Review Of A. Victor Coonin, From Marble To Flesh: The Biography Of Michelangelo’S David, Sandra Cheng Oct 2015

Book Review Of A. Victor Coonin, From Marble To Flesh: The Biography Of Michelangelo’S David, Sandra Cheng

Publications and Research

Beginning of Book Review:
“What makes an icon?” is the underlying question of A. Victor Coonin’s book dedicated to Michelangelo’s statue of David. The larger-than-life-size David has a status akin to Leonardo’s Mona Lisa. Its image, whether whole or fragmented, is instantaneously recognizable, making it difficult to look at it afresh, but Coonin manages to reflect on well-trodden ground in a captivating manner. This study demonstrates how the David is more than an embodiment of masculinity but a statue imbued with multi-faceted symbolism that continues to resonate with viewers today.


Inspiring Piety: The Influence Of Caravaggio’S Paintings In Santa Maria Del Popolo, Cara Coleman Jan 2015

Inspiring Piety: The Influence Of Caravaggio’S Paintings In Santa Maria Del Popolo, Cara Coleman

Williams Honors College, Honors Research Projects

This article looks at the way Italian Baroque painter, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio broke from the artistic conventions of the Renaissance and Mannerist styles in his religious paintings to create an entirely new style that reflected the needs of the post-Tridentine Catholic Church. Caravaggio pushed painting throughout Europe in a new direction, away from the idealization of the Renaissance and the artistic extremes of Mannerism, by popularizing realism in art. Caravaggio’s unique style is examined through comparisons of his paintings, The Conversion of Paul, c.1601 and The Martyrdom of Saint Peter, c.1601 in the Roman basilica, Santa ...


"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff Dec 2014

"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff

History Faculty Publications

From the Intro: “Arms and the Man I sing…” So Vergil begins his epic tale of Aeneas, who overcomes tremendous obstacles to find and establish a new home for his wandering band of Trojan refugees. Were it metrically possible, Vergil could have begun with “Cities and the Man I sing,” for Aeneas’ quest for a new home involves encounters with cities of all types: ancient and new, great and small, real and unreal. These include Dido’s Carthaginian boomtown (1.419–494), Helenus’ humble neo-Troy (3.349–353) and Latinus’ lofty citadel (7.149–192). Of course, central to his ...


Spoliation In Medieval Rome, Dale Kinney Jan 2013

Spoliation In Medieval Rome, Dale Kinney

History of Art Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Romanità A Roma: Le Basiliche Del Xii Secolo Fra Tradizioni E Innovazioni, Dale Kinney Jan 2012

Romanità A Roma: Le Basiliche Del Xii Secolo Fra Tradizioni E Innovazioni, Dale Kinney

History of Art Faculty Research and Scholarship

The “Romanness” (romanitas) of the cathedral portico in Civita Castellana is obvious, but within Rome the criteria of “Romanness” are not so clear. This article takes the architecture of twelfth-century churches as a case in point. Scholars generally agree that romanitas is retrospective and evocative of local tradition, but many of the signature features of these churches – bell towers, marble cloisters, Ionic trabeated porches, marble altar ciboria, paschal candlestands, the “schola cantorum” – were eleventh- or twelfth-century innovations, some- times imported from elsewhere. It is proposed that these features were “invented traditions” as defined by Eric Hobsbawm, which create a “factitious ...


The Discourse Of Columns, Dale Kinney Jan 2011

The Discourse Of Columns, Dale Kinney

History of Art Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Masterpieces Of Italian Literature In Translation, Silvia Valisa Jan 2010

Masterpieces Of Italian Literature In Translation, Silvia Valisa

Silvia Valisa

No abstract provided.


Sex, Lies And Anecdotes: Gender Relations In The Life Stories Of Italian Women Artists, 1550-1800, Julia K. Dabbs Jan 2005

Sex, Lies And Anecdotes: Gender Relations In The Life Stories Of Italian Women Artists, 1550-1800, Julia K. Dabbs

Art History Publications

The writer discusses gender relations in life stories of Italian women artists between 1550 and 1800. In early modern life stories, a recurring emphasis on gender relations, typically deflecting or overshadowing discussion of artistic accomplishment, clearly marks the female artist as a breed apart from her male colleagues. In light of the fact that their biographers were frequently artists themselves, or at least were linked to artistic circles, the commonalities of these anecdotal narratives illuminate how these “miracles of nature” were viewed by the male artistic community, and, by association, the broader society of which they were a part. The ...


A Classical Stage For The Old Nobility: The Strada Nuova And Sixteenth-Century Genoa, George Gorse Jan 1997

A Classical Stage For The Old Nobility: The Strada Nuova And Sixteenth-Century Genoa, George Gorse

Pomona Faculty Publications and Research

Sixteenth-century Genoa produced a distinctively new type of urban space in the Strada Nuova (or, since 1882, the Via Garibaldi)—the residential palace street or linear piazza—designed to legitimize and enhance the authority of a ruling elite.¹ Laid out in 1550-51 and built between 1558 and 1591, the Strada Nuova (Fig. 1), when taken as a whole, represents two significant themes for the history of Genoa and the interpretation of Renaissance cities. First, this major example of Italian Renaissance architecture and urban planning was conceived, and indeed, functioned as a classical stagelike space for the old nobility, who ...


"Representations Of Domestic Space In Medieval Italian Painting" Paper Delivered At The Fordham Medieval Conference: The Family In The Middle Ages, Samuel D. Gruber Dr. Mar 1995

"Representations Of Domestic Space In Medieval Italian Painting" Paper Delivered At The Fordham Medieval Conference: The Family In The Middle Ages, Samuel D. Gruber Dr.

Samuel D. Gruber, Ph.D.

This paper, presented at a conference in 1995, presents impressions about the interior spaces of medieval Italian urban houses based on architecture, literature and painting. The paper in its present state refers to many works of art but is not illustrated or annotated.


Review: Naomi Miller, Renaissance Bologna: A Study In Architectural Form And Content, George Gorse Jan 1993

Review: Naomi Miller, Renaissance Bologna: A Study In Architectural Form And Content, George Gorse

Pomona Faculty Publications and Research

Bologna is a uniquely beautiful Italian city with broad, arcaded streets, richly textured brick and sandstone facades, majestic piazzas, public sculpture, high towers, and a cuisine to take time over. However, the previous historiographic emphasis upon Florence, Rome, and Venice has diverted attention from more fully preserved medieval and Renaissance cities such as Bologna, where urbanism—the urban fabric—takes precedence over individual buildings and architects, and where the urban context defines the architectural monument. Bologna is the work of art. And for this reason, one welcomes the fine book on this major, yet understudied, urban center by Naomi Miller ...


Urbanism, Western Medieval, Samuel D. Gruber Dr. Dec 1989

Urbanism, Western Medieval, Samuel D. Gruber Dr.

Samuel D. Gruber, Ph.D.

Survey of the architectural aspects of medieval urbanism in Western Europe.


Ordering The Urban Environment: City Statutes And City Planning In Medieval Todi, Italy, Samuel D. Gruber Dr. Dec 1989

Ordering The Urban Environment: City Statutes And City Planning In Medieval Todi, Italy, Samuel D. Gruber Dr.

Samuel D. Gruber, Ph.D.

Discusses the deliberate urban policies that of medieval Todi, Italy that helped create a functioning and beautiful medieval town through explicit laws and the careful micro-planning that utilized an incremental urbanism to create an inter-connected and integrated urban environment. Many of the medieval views visitors assume are part of an "organic" growth are actually careful projections of communal power and order.


An Unpublished Description Of The Villa Doria In Genoa During Charles V'S Entry, 1533, George Gorse Jan 1986

An Unpublished Description Of The Villa Doria In Genoa During Charles V'S Entry, 1533, George Gorse

Pomona Faculty Publications and Research

Recent scholarship on the Renaissance villa in Italy has emphasized its two major functions, as a pleasure retreat from the city and as a ceremonial entry into the city. This documentary note publishes a previously unknown Mantuan description of the Villa Doria in Genoa, addressed to Isabella d'Este, during the triumphal entry of Charles V into Genoa from March 28 to April 8, 1533. The document has interest for Renaissance scholars as the first description of the Villa Doria and of Perino del Vaga's decorations of 1529-33. It also shows the villa as part of a ceremonial sequence ...


The Villa Of Andrea Doria In Genoa: Architecture, Gardens, And Suburban Setting, George Gorse Jan 1985

The Villa Of Andrea Doria In Genoa: Architecture, Gardens, And Suburban Setting, George Gorse

Pomona Faculty Publications and Research

This paper reconsiders Andrea Doria's 16th-century villa in Genoa as an architectural and garden monument in relation to its original suburban setting.¹ The villa has thus far been discussed primarily as a decorative monument, with scholars focusing their attention upon the interior fresco and stucco decorations of Perino del Vaga and façade paintings by Perino, Beccafumi, and Pordenone.² However, these paintings have not been understood fully in terms of the architectural, garden, and suburban context of the villa, which serves as the focus of this study.