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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Intertextuality And Iconography In Sergei Iukhimov's Illustrations For The Lord Of The Rings: Five Case Studies, Joel Merriner Apr 2019

Intertextuality And Iconography In Sergei Iukhimov's Illustrations For The Lord Of The Rings: Five Case Studies, Joel Merriner

Journal of Tolkien Research

Intertextuality and Iconography in Sergei Iukhimov’s Illustrations for The Lord of the Rings: Five Case Studies

Abstract

J.R.R. Tolkien once remarked in a letter to his publisher that his friends had been so impressed by Pauline Baynes’ illustrations for Farmer Giles of Ham that they labelled his text a “commentary on the drawings”. This apparently light-hearted anecdote conceals an interesting truth: the relationship between text and image can be problematic and the reading of an illustration depends largely on the culturally acquired discursive precedents which an individual viewer brings to the act of looking. This situation may ...


The Significance Of Cloth In The Narrative Of The Life Of Christ As Represented In Dieric Bouts' "Life Of Christ Altarpiece", Mary-Margaret Mcleod Pilling Apr 2018

The Significance Of Cloth In The Narrative Of The Life Of Christ As Represented In Dieric Bouts' "Life Of Christ Altarpiece", Mary-Margaret Mcleod Pilling

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis explores the materialistic importance of cloth in the life of Jesus Christ and relates it to the disassembled Life of Christ Altarpiece painted by the Renaissance artist Dieric Bouts. References to cloth in the scriptural accounts of Christ’s life support the claim that there is deep theological significance to fabric. The medium of each of the paintings that comprised the altarpiece is a flax linen canvas, which, combined with the references to cloth throughout the compositions, parallels these references to cloth in the scriptures. The entire artwork serves as a metaphor for the Eucharist resting on linen ...


The Presence Of The Church: Morgan Library Ms M. 287, Danielle A. Fallon May 2017

The Presence Of The Church: Morgan Library Ms M. 287, Danielle A. Fallon

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

A discussion of the interwoven presence of the church within the fifteenth century Book of Hours, MS M. 287. This manuscript is argued as a multi-layered object, as a result of the context of its production, unique imagery, and use within the private and public sectors of the patron.


Augustus’S Portrait Archetype: The Role Of The Visual Arts In The Transition From Republic To Empire, Max Santangelo Apr 2017

Augustus’S Portrait Archetype: The Role Of The Visual Arts In The Transition From Republic To Empire, Max Santangelo

Senior Capstone Theses

The assassination of Julius Caesar changed the course of Roman history. Augustus Octavian, Caesar’s adopted heir, inherited the unstable political and cultural situation following Caesar’s rule. As Caesar’s heir, Augustus was thrust into an autocratic position, but after Caesar’s abuse of power the Romans sought a return to a Republican government. Augustus understood that the people would reject a sovereign, but also knew that Rome’s instability did not allow the return to a Republic. He resolved to become the highest authority in Rome and have the Senate function as a political figurehead, thus maintaining the ...


Raising The Dead: Bernini, The Bel Composto, And Theatricality In Counter-Reformation Rome, Colleen Murdock Apr 2017

Raising The Dead: Bernini, The Bel Composto, And Theatricality In Counter-Reformation Rome, Colleen Murdock

Senior Theses and Projects

Skilled in a variety of arts, Gian Lorenzo Bernini incorporated his knowledge of theater to perfect the Baroque concept of the bel composto, meaning the beautiful whole or the effortless and harmonious synthesis of the arts of sculpture, architecture and painting. His connections with the Catholic Church and the efforts of several popes to promote the Counter-Reformation provided commissions and thus opportunities for Bernini to develop and perfect an elevated, theatrical application of the bel composto concept in the designs of Catholic chapels in Rome. However, the bel composto was a technique meant not only to portray spatial unity but ...


Introduction. Stars, Water Wings, And Hairs. Bernini’S Career In Metaphor, Claudia Lehmann, Karen J. Lloyd Jul 2015

Introduction. Stars, Water Wings, And Hairs. Bernini’S Career In Metaphor, Claudia Lehmann, Karen J. Lloyd

Art Faculty Books and Book Chapters

Examining Bernini's works from 1665 on, from Paris and Rome, this book demonstrates the wealth of material still to be drawn from close visual and material examination, archival research, and comparative textual analysis. On the whole, this collection deals with Bernini's position as the leading creator of portraits - in oils, marble, monumental architecture, and metaphor - of some of the most powerful political players of his day. These studies speak to the growing distance of Gallic absolutism from the fading dreams of papal hegemony over Europe, and to the complexities of Bernini's role as mouthpiece, obstacle, and flatterer ...


Visceral Space: Dissection And Michelangelo's Architecture, Chloe Costello May 2015

Visceral Space: Dissection And Michelangelo's Architecture, Chloe Costello

Architecture Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis focuses on the architectural work of Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti, who, perhaps, is better known for his painting and sculpture than for his architecture. Nevertheless, his buildings are revered by architectural historians, such as James Ackerman, for their mimicry of bodily motion and emotion. Under the influence of Renaissance humanism, it was not uncommon for architects to validate their designs by reference to the human body, for example, basing the dimensions of a basilica on ideal bodily proportions. But, Michelangelo's approach in his earliest architectural designs, such as the Medici Chapel (1521-1524) and the Laurentian Library (1523-1525 ...


Norton Simon: The Man With "Two Hats", Helen Ragen Jan 2015

Norton Simon: The Man With "Two Hats", Helen Ragen

Scripps Senior Theses

Norton Simon was a unique collector because he let passion guide his collecting interests, but he controlled his passion by making his purchases based on smart economic decisions bolstered by years of experience in successful business negotiations. The Norton Simon Museum, today in Pasadena, California, displays the eccentric collectors life work as he created one of the greatest and most recognized collections on the west coast. By examining the progression and establishment of Norton Simon Inc., alongside the creation of the Norton Simon Art Foundation, multiple parallels can be drawn between Simons’ unique approach to business and the application of ...


Reflections On Canvas: Caravaggio And The Development Of Optical Stype, Eleanor Rae Harper Aug 2014

Reflections On Canvas: Caravaggio And The Development Of Optical Stype, Eleanor Rae Harper

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

At the height of his career, Baroque painter Michaelangelo de Mersi Caravaggio was revered for his ability to foster a heightened sense of realism never before seen upon the canvas. However as recent scholarship and a renewed interest in the history of artistic methodology reveal, the artist may have utilized optical devices such as a single lens to project reflections of his subjects upon the canvas. Due to the limitations of such devices, spatial discontinuity and unnatural proportion are just two of the discrepancies which have affected the realism and overall unity of his artwork. Caravaggio worked with naturalism in ...


Visual Forms, Visceral Themes: Understanding Bodies, Pain, And Torture In Renaissance Art, Helena Guzik Fcrh '12 Jan 2014

Visual Forms, Visceral Themes: Understanding Bodies, Pain, And Torture In Renaissance Art, Helena Guzik Fcrh '12

The Fordham Undergraduate Research Journal

Despite its relevance to modern discussions, the scholarly treatment of torture in art is relatively infrequent. This project explores, through the visual evidence of artistic works, the implications of Renaissance philosophies surrounding the human body in the context of pain and particularly the physical suffering endured during torture. By examining varying techniques of representing the human form across an array of artistic media, this article strives to illuminate the struggle between the rise of scientific naturalism and prevailing currents of spiritual dualism when considering the question of the body in torment. In highlighting the artist as narrator of Renaissance society ...


Religious Iconography In "Twilight": Veneration And Fandom, Jacqueline E. Swaidan Nov 2013

Religious Iconography In "Twilight": Veneration And Fandom, Jacqueline E. Swaidan

LUX: A Journal of Transdisciplinary Writing and Research from Claremont Graduate University

The mysterious and dark atmosphere, the overwhelming focus on the main characters, and the constant contrast of dark and light in Twilight (2009) recall traditional Christian religious imagery. But more that that, this paper will argue that Twilight, the first of the romantic fantasy films adapted from the successful book series by Stephenie Meyer, draws explicitly on traditional Catholic religious imagery and ceremony to engender religious devotion in its fans. Images from the first Twilight film suggest that the creators of Twilight used religious imagery to captivate their audience. Christian constructs such as Eden’s eternity, Edward’s Christ-like abstinence ...


Power And Nostalgia In Eras Of Cultural Rebirth: The Timeless Allure Of The Farnese Antinous, Kathleen Lamanna Apr 2013

Power And Nostalgia In Eras Of Cultural Rebirth: The Timeless Allure Of The Farnese Antinous, Kathleen Lamanna

Scripps Senior Theses

Little did Hadrian know in 130 A.D. that when he deified his beloved departed Antinous, in order to provide a unifying symbol of worship for his diverse empire, that he was instead creating a lasting symbol of the antique world. This thesis examines the power of nostalgia and its successful use by two formidable men from different eras in Rome: The Emperor Hadrian and the extravagantly wealthy Renaissance merchant Agostino Chigi. Though separated by centuries, each man used the nostalgic allure of the beautiful youthful male figure of Antinous to gain power and influence in his own time and ...


Finding Christ In Giovanni Girolamo Savoldo's Magdalen Paintings, Katherine I. Leavens Jan 2013

Finding Christ In Giovanni Girolamo Savoldo's Magdalen Paintings, Katherine I. Leavens

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This paper examines the techniques Giovanni Girolamo Savoldo utilizes to engage the viewer in his four known variants on the subject of Mary Magdalene. This is achieved through developing the context of an extremely devout Renaissance audience, not only knowledgeable on the subject but also trained to engage with paintings and their subject matter. By examining Savoldo's paintings using John Shearman's concept of the transitive mode, it is possible to understand the way that Savoldo and his predecessors utilize a single figure composition yet through the manipulation of eye contact, body position, and light qualities they are able ...


The Cult Of The Monstrous: Caricature, Physiognomy, And Monsters In Early Modern Italy, Sandra Cheng Jan 2012

The Cult Of The Monstrous: Caricature, Physiognomy, And Monsters In Early Modern Italy, Sandra Cheng

Publications and Research

Caricature emerged as a pictorial genre in early modern Italy and became a potent form of social satire practiced by the period’s foremost draftsmen, including the Carracci and Guercino. The deformed and misshapen subjects of caricature drawings coincided with a fascination with monstrosity. Monsters, aberrations, and anomalies reflected a cultural appreciation for the curious. The monster that slowly took shape in scientific literature was first alluded to in comparative physiognomic texts that related man to beast, then made brief appearances in the discourse on medical conditions, and finally became the primary focus of specialty publications. The attention given to ...


A Focus On Images-Sense And Form: Inaugural Exhibition, Curtis Carter Oct 2010

A Focus On Images-Sense And Form: Inaugural Exhibition, Curtis Carter

Curtis Carter

"A Focus on Images - Sense and Form, an exhibition of selected works from the Permanent Collection with added selections from private collectors, is an occasion to explore a sampling from a variety of artists' images encompassing the 12th century to the present and to reflect upon their importance in human experience. From the mysterious and elegant masks of African tribal arts to the often provocative figurative and abstract wall markings of yesterday's graffitists, artists' images have enjoyed cultural significance quite beyond any apparent contribution to the necessities of day-to- day practical living."


Adorn The Halls: History Of The Art Collection At Thomas Jefferson University, Julie S. Berkowitz Jan 1999

Adorn The Halls: History Of The Art Collection At Thomas Jefferson University, Julie S. Berkowitz

Jefferson History Books

On March 11, 1871 Samuel D. Gross, M.D., the internationally celebrated surgeon and author, entreated fellow Jefferson alumni to "adorn the halls" with portraits of those who had "devoted their lives to the service of the school," and thus "inspire the pupil with ambition to excel in great and noble works." This clarion call to emulate European medical and scientific institutions by memorializing their great men was taken up almost immediately.

One hundred and twenty-five years later, Thomas Jefferson university is still securing portraits, accepting art donations and bequests, and exhibiting art works effectively. By manifesting an appreciation for ...