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Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

From Lace To Chains. The Making Of A Print, Alison G. Stewart Apr 2019

From Lace To Chains. The Making Of A Print, Alison G. Stewart

Zea E-Books

How have printed works of art changed over time? Do printmakers today work with the same materials and techniques that printmakers used centuries ago? And does printmaking involve the same motivations, concerns, or methods of distribution today as it did in the past?

These were questions asked by University of Nebraska–Lincoln students in a history of prints class in the School of Art, Art History & Design taught by Hixson-Lied Professor of Art History Alison Stewart during fall semester 2018. For this curatorial project, students selected one set of old master prints (pre-1850) and one modern (post-1850) print from Sheldon ...


Soaring Without Safety, David Keck, Elyse M. Miata Jan 2018

Soaring Without Safety, David Keck, Elyse M. Miata

Publications

When pilots and avi­ation enthusiasts find themselves in Washington, D.C., they often plan a trip to the Mall to visit the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. But those who love the skies might also want to walk directly across the Mall and visit the Nation­al Gallery of Art, where we recommend taking a look at one of our favorite paintings: Peter Paul Rubens's The Fall of Phaeton. This piece of Ba­roque art speaks powerfully to aviators, as it shows what happens if the rules of the sky are disregarded.


Dinner, Daniel Reuben Baskin May 2017

Dinner, Daniel Reuben Baskin

Theses and Dissertations

Dinner is an interactive exhibition which presents appropriated works of art collected and hung in a clustered salon style, as well as a fully realized recreation based on a 16th century Dutch banquet still-life, which presents guests with meats, cheeses, fruits, vegetables, breads, and wine to share and imbibe. Dining ware is provided for guests at the entrance to the exhibit, as are suggested topics of conversation, which are presented on slips of paper for guests to carry with them throughout their time in the space. Within the collection of wall-mounted works are references to ancient Greek and Roman marble ...


Windows To The Divine: The Development Of Byzantine Art, Sam Klein Jan 2017

Windows To The Divine: The Development Of Byzantine Art, Sam Klein

Tenor of Our Times

Byzantine art took significant inspiration form its Greco-Roman heritage but then distinguished itself through a shift in focus away from Hellenic realism and towards formal abstractions of Christian motifs. These conventions developed alongside political and theological turbulence to eventually influence a vast area of Asia Minor and Eastern Europe.


Body, Blood, And Flood: The Ripple Of Kinesics Through Nature In Leonardo Da Vinci's Art, Rachael Herrera Jan 2017

Body, Blood, And Flood: The Ripple Of Kinesics Through Nature In Leonardo Da Vinci's Art, Rachael Herrera

Scripps Senior Theses

Leonardo da Vinci's art and science have a dynamic relationship that can be used to better understand the role of the individual and the human body within his art. Leonardo believed that movements of the body were expressions of the soul. He also thought that the body was as a microcosm of the physical world. The theories, based in ancient tradition, would be challenged by his work with the human anatomy. By studying his notebooks it becomes evident that Leonardo held nature to be the highest creator of the world but as he worked to understand the human body ...


The Black Death In The Medieval World: How Art Reflected The Human Experience Through A Macabre Lens, Shirley M. Carrade Dec 2016

The Black Death In The Medieval World: How Art Reflected The Human Experience Through A Macabre Lens, Shirley M. Carrade

Senior Theses and Capstone Projects

In the fourteenth century a devastating pandemic disease known as the Black Death was responsible for the tragic death of millions of Europeans. The wide ranging consequences affected Europe’s culture, religion, and economic stability. These consequences can be seen most directly in the visual arts, notably with the prevalent motif of images of the dead interacting with humans. This interaction between the dead and the living can be found in the famous Triumph of Death, by Francisco Traini (ca. 1350) and the Dance of Death, by Bernt Notke (n.d.). These paintings are just a few of the many ...


French Women In Art: Reclaiming The Body Through Creation/Les Femmes Artistes Françaises : La Réclamation Du Corps À Travers La Création, Liatris Hethcoat Dec 2016

French Women In Art: Reclaiming The Body Through Creation/Les Femmes Artistes Françaises : La Réclamation Du Corps À Travers La Création, Liatris Hethcoat

Student Scholar Symposium Abstracts and Posters

The research I have conducted for my French Major Senior Thesis is a culmination of my passion for and studies of both French language and culture and the history and practice of Visual Arts. I have examined, across the history of art, the representation of women, and concluded that until the 20th century, these representations have been tools employed by the makers of history and those at the top of the patriarchal system, used to control women’s images and thus women themselves. I survey these representations, which are largely created by men—until the 20th century. I ...


Roman Archaism In Depictions Of Apollo In The Augustan Period, Alisha Sanders May 2016

Roman Archaism In Depictions Of Apollo In The Augustan Period, Alisha Sanders

Honors Projects

At the end of the first century BCE, in order to spread the values and concepts that he wanted to perpetuate in his new political order, Augustus Caesar revived an archaistic art style based on that of the archaic period of ancient Greece. It was in this time that the Roman Empire was being established, and Augustus was taking sole power of the Roman world. This study is focused on works that include depictions of Apollo because one of the first and most studied examples of Augustus’s use of Roman archaism was the decorative program of the Temple of ...


Abbot Suger’S St. Denis And The Cult Of Relics, Kathryn Funderburg Jan 2016

Abbot Suger’S St. Denis And The Cult Of Relics, Kathryn Funderburg

The Expositor: A Journal of Undergraduate Research in the Humanities

No abstract provided.


Crescendo, Jeffery A. Pabotoy Jan 2016

Crescendo, Jeffery A. Pabotoy

Theses and Dissertations

Artist Statement

I have always found comfort and warmth in my family. When I am not with them, I find myself clinging to the objects they leave behind as a substitute in their absence. As I began to re-create these objects through paintings and ceramics, I realized that I was creating symbolic portraits of my family. These portraits are tangible family moments preserved in pigment and clay.

In recent years, my siblings were deployed to war and I began to represent them as various instruments. These instruments, both musical and tools of war, chronicle who they were and who they ...


Performing Conquest And Resistance In The Streets Of Eighteenth Century Potosí: Identity And Artifice In The Cityscapes Of Gaspar Miguel De Berrío And Melchor Pérez De Holguín, Agnieszka A. Ficek Dec 2015

Performing Conquest And Resistance In The Streets Of Eighteenth Century Potosí: Identity And Artifice In The Cityscapes Of Gaspar Miguel De Berrío And Melchor Pérez De Holguín, Agnieszka A. Ficek

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

This thesis examines the ways in which Potosí's two most influential colonial artists represented the urban dynamics of race, class and labor in their depictions of the Andean 'City of Silver' during the eighteenth century, when silver production, profits and population were dramatically declining.


Book Review Of A. Victor Coonin, From Marble To Flesh: The Biography Of Michelangelo’S David, Sandra Cheng Oct 2015

Book Review Of A. Victor Coonin, From Marble To Flesh: The Biography Of Michelangelo’S David, Sandra Cheng

Publications and Research

Beginning of Book Review:
“What makes an icon?” is the underlying question of A. Victor Coonin’s book dedicated to Michelangelo’s statue of David. The larger-than-life-size David has a status akin to Leonardo’s Mona Lisa. Its image, whether whole or fragmented, is instantaneously recognizable, making it difficult to look at it afresh, but Coonin manages to reflect on well-trodden ground in a captivating manner. This study demonstrates how the David is more than an embodiment of masculinity but a statue imbued with multi-faceted symbolism that continues to resonate with viewers today.


The Multi-Cultural Identity Of Medieval Sicily: William Ii’S Complex At Monreale, Lindsay K. Henry May 2015

The Multi-Cultural Identity Of Medieval Sicily: William Ii’S Complex At Monreale, Lindsay K. Henry

Honors Projects and Presentations: Undergraduate

During the eleventh and twelfth centuries, the Norman kingdom of Sicily sustained a variety of distinct cultures. Remnants of these cultures can be seen, both subtly and overtly, in the art and architecture of its capital city of Palermo, and the nearby city of Monreale. Through an analysis of the architectural and artistic features of the cathedral and cloister of Santa Maria la Nuova in Monreale, this paper discusses the cultural dynamic of Monreale. Particular consideration will be given to the elements of the Norman, Latin, Greek, and Islamic cultures incorporated in the construction of the complex.


Inspiring Piety: The Influence Of Caravaggio’S Paintings In Santa Maria Del Popolo, Cara Coleman Jan 2015

Inspiring Piety: The Influence Of Caravaggio’S Paintings In Santa Maria Del Popolo, Cara Coleman

Williams Honors College, Honors Research Projects

This article looks at the way Italian Baroque painter, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio broke from the artistic conventions of the Renaissance and Mannerist styles in his religious paintings to create an entirely new style that reflected the needs of the post-Tridentine Catholic Church. Caravaggio pushed painting throughout Europe in a new direction, away from the idealization of the Renaissance and the artistic extremes of Mannerism, by popularizing realism in art. Caravaggio’s unique style is examined through comparisons of his paintings, The Conversion of Paul, c.1601 and The Martyrdom of Saint Peter, c.1601 in the Roman basilica, Santa ...


Reflections On Canvas: Caravaggio And The Development Of Optical Stype, Eleanor Rae Harper Aug 2014

Reflections On Canvas: Caravaggio And The Development Of Optical Stype, Eleanor Rae Harper

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

At the height of his career, Baroque painter Michaelangelo de Mersi Caravaggio was revered for his ability to foster a heightened sense of realism never before seen upon the canvas. However as recent scholarship and a renewed interest in the history of artistic methodology reveal, the artist may have utilized optical devices such as a single lens to project reflections of his subjects upon the canvas. Due to the limitations of such devices, spatial discontinuity and unnatural proportion are just two of the discrepancies which have affected the realism and overall unity of his artwork. Caravaggio worked with naturalism in ...


The Hierarchy Of Rococo Women Seen Through Fashion Paintings, Sanda Brighidin Aug 2014

The Hierarchy Of Rococo Women Seen Through Fashion Paintings, Sanda Brighidin

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

The style of Rococo evokes a variety of feminine attributions; women were usually depicted in works of art in a decorative manner. Many of the interpretations of these paintings focus on the luxurious clothes and lavish backgrounds. Artists like Jean-Antoine Watteau and Francois Boucher were responsible for elevating a very elegant view of Rococo women of Rococo within the public’s eyes. But there were also depictions of non-aristocratic women that were geared more to the middle class (bourgeois). After reading a number of articles and book chapters on Jean-Baptiste- Simeon Chardin, and visiting the Louvre museum in Paris, I ...


Economic Underpinning Of Renaissance Italian Art, Katherine Jacobson Apr 2014

Economic Underpinning Of Renaissance Italian Art, Katherine Jacobson

Undergraduate Research Symposium 2014

In 1902, art historian, Aby Warburg, asserted that in Renaissance Italy, "works of art owed their making to the mutual understanding between patrons and artists. The works were, from the outset, the results of a negotiation between client and executant". This research seeks to examine patronage relationships in the context of politically fragmented Renaissance Italy to further our understanding of art's ability to promote political, ideological, or religious agendas. By referencing renowned works of art from the Italian Renaissance, I attempt to identify the significance of using culture and art as a rhetorical tool, rather than other more direct ...


The Efficacy Of Mathematics Education, Eric Geimer Feb 2014

The Efficacy Of Mathematics Education, Eric Geimer

The STEAM Journal

Evidence supports the notion that mathematics education in the United States is inadequate. There is also evidence that mathematics education deficiencies extend internationally. The worldwide mathematics education deficit appears large enough that improving student performance in this educational problem area could yield great economic benefit. To improve the efficacy of mathematics education, education’s root problems must first be understood. Often supposed educational root problems are considered and contrasted against potential deficiencies of mathematics methodologies and curricula that are based on mainstream educational philosophies. The educational philosophies utilized to form early-grade mathematics methodologies and related curricula are judged to be ...


Memory In Paintings Of Quattrocentro Renaissance Florence: Religious Paintings And Secular Portraits, Ashley Matcheck Sep 2011

Memory In Paintings Of Quattrocentro Renaissance Florence: Religious Paintings And Secular Portraits, Ashley Matcheck

Psi Sigma Siren

Collective memory studies as a field has always been the interdisciplinary study of how and why memories have been created. The difference between collective or cultural memory studies and that of a strictly historical study is often discussed and debated as people question whether memory or history is more valuable regarding past events. Jan Assmann explains that “in the context of cultural memory, the distinction between myth and history vanishes. Not the past as such, as it is investigated and reconstructed by archaeologists and historians, counts for the cultural memory, but only the past as it is remembered.” Assmann has ...


“Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?”: Freud And The Unconscious Of Paul Gauguin, Lauren Cavalli Oct 2010

“Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?”: Freud And The Unconscious Of Paul Gauguin, Lauren Cavalli

Art & Art History Student Papers

No abstract provided.


Metallurgy In The Roman Forts Of Scotland: An Archaeological Analysis, Scott S. Stetkiewicz Aug 2010

Metallurgy In The Roman Forts Of Scotland: An Archaeological Analysis, Scott S. Stetkiewicz

Honors Projects Overview

Investigates the presence of metalworking in thirty-seven Roman forts in Scotland during the Flavian, Antonine, and Severan occupations largely through analysis of published documentation concerning relevant archaeological excavations.


Meaningful Mingling: Classicizing Imagery And Islamicizing Script In A Byzantine Bowl, Alicia Walker Jan 2008

Meaningful Mingling: Classicizing Imagery And Islamicizing Script In A Byzantine Bowl, Alicia Walker

History of Art Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


San Francesco D'Assisi E Santa Caterina Da Siena. La Loro Influenza Sulla Letteratura, La Cultura, La Religione E L'Arte Italiana Dei Primordi, Ann-Frances Hamill Dec 2006

San Francesco D'Assisi E Santa Caterina Da Siena. La Loro Influenza Sulla Letteratura, La Cultura, La Religione E L'Arte Italiana Dei Primordi, Ann-Frances Hamill

Master's Theses, Dissertations, Graduate Research and Major Papers Overview

Examines the works and thoughts of two Italian saints: Saint Francis of Assisi (1181-1226) and Saint Catherine of Siena (1347-1380). Explores the common ideological denominator in the works of these major figures and analyzes their impact on Italian society and culture.


Adorn The Halls: History Of The Art Collection At Thomas Jefferson University, Julie S. Berkowitz Jan 1999

Adorn The Halls: History Of The Art Collection At Thomas Jefferson University, Julie S. Berkowitz

Jefferson History Books

On March 11, 1871 Samuel D. Gross, M.D., the internationally celebrated surgeon and author, entreated fellow Jefferson alumni to "adorn the halls" with portraits of those who had "devoted their lives to the service of the school," and thus "inspire the pupil with ambition to excel in great and noble works." This clarion call to emulate European medical and scientific institutions by memorializing their great men was taken up almost immediately.

One hundred and twenty-five years later, Thomas Jefferson university is still securing portraits, accepting art donations and bequests, and exhibiting art works effectively. By manifesting an appreciation for ...


James, Liz. Light And Color In Byzantine Art, Kathleen Maxwell Sep 1998

James, Liz. Light And Color In Byzantine Art, Kathleen Maxwell

Art and Art History

James' title coupled with the generous number of color illustrations in her text led me to assume that she would survey Byzantine art in more traditional terms of light and color. Instead, the book pursues the perceptual repercussions of color in Byzantine art and is based on James' dissertation, "Colour Perception in Byzantium" (University of London, 1989).


Michelangelo's Sistine Ceiling : A Portrait Of The Renaissance, Anne A. Ferris Jan 1985

Michelangelo's Sistine Ceiling : A Portrait Of The Renaissance, Anne A. Ferris

Honors Theses

Because a single theological interpretation of the Sistine Ceiling cannot be made, the ceiling is a portrait of Renaissance concepts. Besides the personal struggles of the Pope and Michelangelo between 1508 and 1512, the ceiling is representative of the whole century before its creation. Michelangelo has mingled both civic and religious sentiments into the ceiling. Michelangelo has combined his experiences in the Medici circle with his personal beliefs. The ceiling with its most basic depiction of the fundamental concept of man's aspiration of redemption becomes almost a chaotic representation of the history of man, but which contrasts with the ...