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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Chinese Porcelain And The Material Taxonomies Of Medieval Rabbinic Law: Encounters With Disruptive Substances In Twelfth-Century Yemen, Elizabeth Lambourn, Phillip I. Ackerman-Lieberman Dec 2016

Chinese Porcelain And The Material Taxonomies Of Medieval Rabbinic Law: Encounters With Disruptive Substances In Twelfth-Century Yemen, Elizabeth Lambourn, Phillip I. Ackerman-Lieberman

The Medieval Globe

This article focuses on a set of legal questions about ṣīnī vessels (literally, “Chinese” vessels) sent from the Jewish community in Aden to Fustat (Old Cairo) in the mid-1130s CE and now preserved among the Cairo Geniza holdings in Cambridge University Library. This is the earliest dated and localized query about the status of ṣīnī vessels with respect to the Jewish law of vessels used for food consumption. Our analysis of these queries suggests that their phrasing and timing can be linked to the contemporaneous appearance in the Yemen of a new type of Chinese ceramic ware, qingbai, which confounded ...


The Black Death In The Medieval World: How Art Reflected The Human Experience Through A Macabre Lens, Shirley M. Carrade Dec 2016

The Black Death In The Medieval World: How Art Reflected The Human Experience Through A Macabre Lens, Shirley M. Carrade

Senior Theses and Capstone Projects

In the fourteenth century a devastating pandemic disease known as the Black Death was responsible for the tragic death of millions of Europeans. The wide ranging consequences affected Europe’s culture, religion, and economic stability. These consequences can be seen most directly in the visual arts, notably with the prevalent motif of images of the dead interacting with humans. This interaction between the dead and the living can be found in the famous Triumph of Death, by Francisco Traini (ca. 1350) and the Dance of Death, by Bernt Notke (n.d.). These paintings are just a few of the many ...


Cats And Dogs: The Development Of The Household Pet Through Symbolic Interpretations And Social Practices In The Middle Ages And Renaissance, Lindsey Nicole Blair Jan 2016

Cats And Dogs: The Development Of The Household Pet Through Symbolic Interpretations And Social Practices In The Middle Ages And Renaissance, Lindsey Nicole Blair

Honors Theses at the University of Iowa

Cats and dogs are perhaps the most ubiquitous and consistently represented animals throughout documented human history. Forms of the respective species have roamed the earth for millions of years; however, cats and dogs have held different societal positions ranging from exalted deities to pests. The shifting attitudes and social practices between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Western Europe fostered the reexamination of the relationship between humans and animals. Dogs – and later cats – were the earliest animals to be allowed occupancy inside the medieval house solely to serve utilitarian needs. The development of the modern day concept of the ...