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2014

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Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff Dec 2014

"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff

History Faculty Publications

From the Intro: “Arms and the Man I sing…” So Vergil begins his epic tale of Aeneas, who overcomes tremendous obstacles to find and establish a new home for his wandering band of Trojan refugees. Were it metrically possible, Vergil could have begun with “Cities and the Man I sing,” for Aeneas’ quest for a new home involves encounters with cities of all types: ancient and new, great and small, real and unreal. These include Dido’s Carthaginian boomtown (1.419–494), Helenus’ humble neo-Troy (3.349–353) and Latinus’ lofty citadel (7.149–192). Of course, central to his ...


Cosimo De’ Medici: Patron, Banker, And Pater Patriae, Jessie E. Martin Oct 2014

Cosimo De’ Medici: Patron, Banker, And Pater Patriae, Jessie E. Martin

Student Publications

This paper investigates the connection between art, money, and power in the life of Cosimo de' Medici. It discusses several important art works commissioned by Cosimo, including the Medici Palace and Donatello's bronze David. It also examines Cosimo's life as a businessman and a political figure.


Negotiating Julio-Claudian Memory: The Vespasianic Building Program And The Representation Of Imperial Power In Ancient Rome, Joseph V. Frankl May 2014

Negotiating Julio-Claudian Memory: The Vespasianic Building Program And The Representation Of Imperial Power In Ancient Rome, Joseph V. Frankl

Classics Honors Projects

In 70 C.E., the general Vespasian became the emperor of the Roman world. His accession marked the end of a year-long civil war and the beginning of the second imperial dynasty. The legitimacy of his rule depended on addressing the memory of his predecessors, the Julio-Claudian dynasty. This paper examines expressions of Vespasian’s relationship with the Julio-Claudians as evident in the emperor’s public buildings in Rome. The form, location, and symbolism of five structures that constituted Vespasian’s building program will be considered. These buildings utilized several modes for interacting with the past including: condemning some Julio-Claudian ...


“All Are Punished”: Violent [Self-]Destruction In Pieter Bruegel’S Triumph Of Death, Samuel Schnittman May 2014

“All Are Punished”: Violent [Self-]Destruction In Pieter Bruegel’S Triumph Of Death, Samuel Schnittman

Undergraduate Humanities Forum 2013-2014: Violence

Pieter Bruegel the Elder's Triumph of Death (Prado, Madrid) has received relatively little scholarly attention for obvious reasons: its rampant annihilation of humanity and dour pessimism bear little resemblance to his more typical representations of peasants and folly with humanist, satirical undertones. Perhaps even more puzzling than this disjuncture is its eerie combination of eschatology within a fully earthly apocalypse. To reconcile these paradoxes, we must analyze Bruegel's formal and iconographic links with Hieronymus Bosch and earlier Netherlandish visual traditions amidst contemporary, religious, and political struggles during the nascent Dutch Revolt. This enigmatic Bruegel picture suggests the complex ...


The Imperial Temple At Antiochia Ad Cragum: Aspects Of Architecture And Iconography, Geraldine S. Dobos Apr 2014

The Imperial Temple At Antiochia Ad Cragum: Aspects Of Architecture And Iconography, Geraldine S. Dobos

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

Along the northeastern Mediterranean shore lies Antiochia ad Cragum, an ancient city located in the western area of the Roman province of Rough Cilicia. It is now known as the village of Guney, in southern Turkey. The Northeast Temple is the first Imperial structure at Antiochia that has been revealed in its entirety and its reconstruction is anticipated. This excavation by the University of Nebraska (Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project, or ACARP), is directed by UNL Professor Michael Hoff.

The hypothetical reconstruction of the Northeast Temple’s geison course, which I present, emphasizes certain diagnostic features that may be ...


Review Of "Vessels And Variety: New Aspects Of Ancient Pottery", Justin St. P. Walsh Apr 2014

Review Of "Vessels And Variety: New Aspects Of Ancient Pottery", Justin St. P. Walsh

Art Faculty Articles and Research

Book Review of Vessels and Variety: New Aspects of Ancient Pottery, edited by Hanne Thomasen, Annette Rathje, and Kristen Bøggild Johannsen


Letters & Lines: Text And Image In Northern Renaissance & Baroque Prints, Dana Sue Angotta, Victoria Côté, Chloe Cunningham, Taylor Evertsberg, Diamond Mcclintock, Victoria Schonfeld, Benjamin Slyngstad, Lauren Wyman, Phillip Earenfight, Trout Gallery Feb 2014

Letters & Lines: Text And Image In Northern Renaissance & Baroque Prints, Dana Sue Angotta, Victoria Côté, Chloe Cunningham, Taylor Evertsberg, Diamond Mcclintock, Victoria Schonfeld, Benjamin Slyngstad, Lauren Wyman, Phillip Earenfight, Trout Gallery

Student Scholarship & Creative Works By Year

Catalogue of an exhibition at the Trout Gallery, February 21 - April 12, 2014.

Senior Exhibit, Art and Art History Department, Prof. Phillip Earenfight, Dickinson College.

In Letters & Lines, the exhibition co-curators examine a number of questions posed by the integration of text and image in Renaissance and Baroque prints. [from introduction by Phillip Earenfight]

Table of Contents

Letters & Lines: An Introduction to Text and Image in the Pictorial Arts / by Phillip Earenfight.

Jan Lutma the Younger: Posteritati / by Dana Angotta.

The Seven Vices: Sinful Symbolism of Animals / by Victoria Côté.

“Who Withholds Corn, the People Curse, but Blessings Upon He ...


Preliminary Report On The 2013 Field Season Of The American Excavations At Morgantina: Contrada Agnese Project (Cap), Alex Walthall, Randall Souza, Jared Benton, James F. Huemoeller Jan 2014

Preliminary Report On The 2013 Field Season Of The American Excavations At Morgantina: Contrada Agnese Project (Cap), Alex Walthall, Randall Souza, Jared Benton, James F. Huemoeller

Art Faculty Publications

This article provides a preliminary report on the 2013 excavations carried out by the American Excavations at Morgantina (Sicily): Contrada Agnese Project (CAP). The 2013 season marked the start of this multiyear research and excavation project aimed at investigating both the urban planning of the city and the lives of its residents, with a specific focus on the periods of occupation and cultural transformation from the third to first century BCE. During the first season, three trenches were excavated in two parts of the ancient city. Their locations were chosen, in part, based on the results of a geophysical survey ...


The Western Façade Of Santiago De Compostela: Christian Dominion And Ecclesiastical Rivalry From The Medieval To The Baroque Period, Louisa M. Raitt Jan 2014

The Western Façade Of Santiago De Compostela: Christian Dominion And Ecclesiastical Rivalry From The Medieval To The Baroque Period, Louisa M. Raitt

Summer Research

As a prominent world power through much of western history, Spain was a fundamental player in creating several western cultural establishments especially regarding the realm of Christianity. As the culminating shrine of the Pilgrimage Road to Santiago de Compostela, the shrine to Saint James in the northwest corner of Spain boasts a rich history of religious, political and cultural significance. Through a visual and contextual analysis, this paper asserts that the two primary renovations of the western façade at Santiago de Compostela (the Portico of Glory in the 12th-13th century and the Façade of Obradoiro in the ...


The Rock-Cut Room On The Acropolis At Golemo Gradište, Konjuh: Date And Purpose, Carolyn S. Snively Jan 2014

The Rock-Cut Room On The Acropolis At Golemo Gradište, Konjuh: Date And Purpose, Carolyn S. Snively

Classics Faculty Publications

The anonymous city at the site of Golemo Gradište at the village of Konjuh, R. Macedonia, belongs to the period of Late Antiquity; the evidence indicates that it was founded in the 5th century. The lower town on the northern terrace was reconstructed, probably during the second quarter of the 6th century, but the inhabitants abandoned it, for the most part, later in that century and fled for refuge to the acropolis, where a settlement continued to exist into the early 7th century. Earlier material, beginning with the Late Neolithic and continuing sporadically through Bronze Age to Hellenistic, has been ...


Embodiment Of The Halaf: Sixth Millennium Figurines From Northern Mesopotamia, Ellen H. Belcher Jan 2014

Embodiment Of The Halaf: Sixth Millennium Figurines From Northern Mesopotamia, Ellen H. Belcher

Publications and Research

This dissertation answers the question, "What are Halaf figurines?" In response to that question, this study examines a corpus of anthropomorphic figurines from archaeological sites dating to the Halaf period (Sixth Millennium cal BCE) known from excavations in Turkey and Syria. Included in this dissertation is a detailed catalog of 197 figurine examples, both whole and fragmented, and analysis of their excavated contexts from seven Halaf sites in Turkey and nine sites in Syria. The study also reviews and discusses existing literature on Halaf and figurine studies and examines and critiques modern biases, assumptions, and influences, especially as related to ...


Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart Jan 2014

Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart

Faculty Publications and Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

When Jacob Seisenegger and Titian painted individual portraits of Emperor Charles V around 1532, a dog replaced such traditional accouterments of imperial power as crown, scepter, and orb.3 Charles placed one hand on the dog’s collar, a gesture indicating his companion’s noble qualities including faithfulness.4 At the same time, another more down-to-earth meaning for the dog had become prominent in the decades before the imperial portraits: the interest in and ability to eat anything in sight. This pig-like ability resulted in dogs, alongside pigs, becoming emblems of indiscriminate and gluttonous eating and drinking during the early ...


The Authenticity Of The James Ossuary, Amnon Rosenfeld, Howard R. Feldman, Wolfgang E. Krumbein Jan 2014

The Authenticity Of The James Ossuary, Amnon Rosenfeld, Howard R. Feldman, Wolfgang E. Krumbein

Lander College for Women - The Anna Ruth and Mark Hasten School Publications and Research

An archaeometric analysis of the James Ossuary inscription “James Son of Joseph Brother of Jesus” strengthens the contention that the ossuary and its engravings are authentic. The beige patina can be observed on the surface of the ossuary, continuing gradationally into the engraved inscription. Fine long striations made by the friction of falling roof rocks continuously crosscut the letters. Many dissolution pits are superimposed on several of the letters of the inscription. In addition to calcite and quartz, the patina contains the following minerals: apatite, whewellite and weddelite (calcium oxalate). These minerals result from the biogenic activity of microorganisms that ...


Review: Paolo De Matteis: Neapolitan Painting And Cultural History In Baroque Europe By Livio Pestilli, David Cast Jan 2014

Review: Paolo De Matteis: Neapolitan Painting And Cultural History In Baroque Europe By Livio Pestilli, David Cast

History of Art Faculty Research and Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Stained Glass And Liturgy: The Uses And Limits Of An Analogy, Gerry Guest Jan 2014

Stained Glass And Liturgy: The Uses And Limits Of An Analogy, Gerry Guest

Art History

This article considers how we might productively juxtapose the study of medieval stained glass and the study of liturgy. Central to the argument is the notion that both narrative stained glass and medieval liturgical rites can be understood as spatial practices. In their concatenation of scenes, narrative windows of the 12th and 13th centuries create what might be termed maps of the medieval world. These maps are undergirded by ideologies of space that were in play during that period. At heart, these maps can be read as interventions, as attempts to remake the medieval world for the sacred. The article ...


Review Of The Imagery Of The Athenian Symposium, Justin St. P. Walsh Jan 2014

Review Of The Imagery Of The Athenian Symposium, Justin St. P. Walsh

Art Faculty Articles and Research

A review of Kathryn Topper's The Imagery of the Athenian Symposium.


Athenian Black Glass Pottery: A View From The West, Justin St. P. Walsh, Carla Antonaccio Jan 2014

Athenian Black Glass Pottery: A View From The West, Justin St. P. Walsh, Carla Antonaccio

Art Faculty Articles and Research

Excavation of archaic Morgantina (c.700–450 BC), Sicily, has brought to light a significant pattern in the distribution of imported Greek pottery. This pattern, which shows a preference for imports with features that referred to metal vessels, is echoed at sites around the western Mediterranean. We argue that the preference for certain types was communicated back to Greek producers, and that it also reflects the particular local interests of non-Greeks, who associated metallic features not only with wealth, but also with their own ancestral traditions.


Technology And Wonder In Thirteenth-Century Iberia And Beyond, Christopher B. Swift Jan 2014

Technology And Wonder In Thirteenth-Century Iberia And Beyond, Christopher B. Swift

Publications and Research

As the desire for affective experiences of the sacred increased in communities across Europe in the late Middle Ages, the Christian faithful crafted lifelike, mechanized figures of Christ, the Virgin Mary, and saints for use in religious festivals. Although each devotional culture evidences unique body/object relationships and meanings, in general animated ritual objects encouraged lay participation in the celebration of saints and the Passion by engaging the senses, and, consequently, an emotional sense of God. In this essay I investigate the ritual alliances between moveable, prop-like saints and their Iberian devotees, in particular the performative meanings that arose from ...