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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Arts & Humanities In Ancient Greece, Robert Hillman, Marlene Slough, Todd Bruns Aug 2014

Arts & Humanities In Ancient Greece, Robert Hillman, Marlene Slough, Todd Bruns

Marlene Slough

As one of the founding pillars of western civilization, ancient Greece created cultural traditions that continue to influence many aspects of the modern world that we now take for granted. Focusing on the arts and humanities, this exhibit explores ancient Greek architecture, sculpture, poetry, theater, music, and handcrafts like pottery, clothing and jewelry. Included is biographical information on some of the major historical figures important to these fields of endeavor.


Micro-Architecture As A Spatial And Conceptual Frame In Byzantium: Canopies In The Monastery Of Hosios Loukas, Jelena Bogdanović Jan 2014

Micro-Architecture As A Spatial And Conceptual Frame In Byzantium: Canopies In The Monastery Of Hosios Loukas, Jelena Bogdanović

Jelena Bogdanović

The use of architecture as a visual and conceptual frame is well attested in medieval art. For example, in medieval illuminations, architectural frames are often used to separate images from the accompanying texts. Such architectural 140 frames signify potent transparent boundaries between the space of the beholder and the space of that which is seen and, therefore, define perceptible liminal spaces. Actual architectural frames and their role in defining sacred space, however, have been studied far less.


Stained Glass And Liturgy: The Uses And Limits Of An Analogy, Gerald B. Guest Dec 2013

Stained Glass And Liturgy: The Uses And Limits Of An Analogy, Gerald B. Guest

Gerald B. Guest

This article considers how we might productively juxtapose the study of medieval stained glass and the study of liturgy. Central to the argument is the notion that both narrative stained glass and medieval liturgical rites can be understood as spatial practices. In their concatenation of scenes, narrative windows of the 12th and 13th centuries create what might be termed maps of the medieval world. These maps are undergirded by ideologies of space that were in play during that period. At heart, these maps can be read as interventions, as attempts to remake the medieval world for the sacred. The article ...