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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

The Imperial Temple At Antiochia Ad Cragum: Aspects Of Architecture And Iconography, Geraldine S. Dobos Apr 2014

The Imperial Temple At Antiochia Ad Cragum: Aspects Of Architecture And Iconography, Geraldine S. Dobos

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

Along the northeastern Mediterranean shore lies Antiochia ad Cragum, an ancient city located in the western area of the Roman province of Rough Cilicia. It is now known as the village of Guney, in southern Turkey. The Northeast Temple is the first Imperial structure at Antiochia that has been revealed in its entirety and its reconstruction is anticipated. This excavation by the University of Nebraska (Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project, or ACARP), is directed by UNL Professor Michael Hoff.

The hypothetical reconstruction of the Northeast Temple’s geison course, which I present, emphasizes certain diagnostic features that may be ...


Society And Style: Prints From The Sheldon Museum Of Art, Alison G. Stewart, Paul Royster Jan 2014

Society And Style: Prints From The Sheldon Museum Of Art, Alison G. Stewart, Paul Royster

Zea E-Books

This collection of works explores how Societies and Styles changed over the course of Early Modern Europe (1500-1800) from the time of the advent of printing on paper to the Industrial Revolution and beyond through little-seen printed masterpieces from the Sheldon Museum of Art’s collection. Today, “print” continues to endure even as new forms of digital publications transform our world in previously unimaginable ways, just as printing did centuries ago.

This exhibition offers a view into the ways printed works of art on paper (mostly woodcuts, engravings, and etchings) showcase society and its various aspects, ranging from one Christian ...


Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart Jan 2014

Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart

Faculty Publications and Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

When Jacob Seisenegger and Titian painted individual portraits of Emperor Charles V around 1532, a dog replaced such traditional accouterments of imperial power as crown, scepter, and orb.3 Charles placed one hand on the dog’s collar, a gesture indicating his companion’s noble qualities including faithfulness.4 At the same time, another more down-to-earth meaning for the dog had become prominent in the decades before the imperial portraits: the interest in and ability to eat anything in sight. This pig-like ability resulted in dogs, alongside pigs, becoming emblems of indiscriminate and gluttonous eating and drinking during the early ...